Yearbooks

Programme: BPolSci Political Studies

Code NQF level Faculty Duration Credits
01130039 NQF level:  07 Faculty of Humanities Minimum duration of study: 3 years Total credits: 370
Contact:
Dr FG Wolmarans
[email protected]
+27 (0)124202689

Programme information

This programme is aimed at the development of knowledge and skills to understand political developments and events and the impact thereof. This will enable the student, once employed in the public or private sector, to respond in an innovative and proactive manner to the problems and challenges of the political environment.

Admission requirements

  • Candidates are advised to apply early. Space is limited in all programmes. As soon as a programme reaches its full capacity, applications for the specific programme will be closed, even if it is before the official closing date.
  • The following candidates will be considered for admission:
  1. A candidate who is in possession of a certificate that is deemed by the University to be equivalent to the required National Senior Certificate (NSC) with university endorsement; a candidate who is a graduate from another recognised tertiary institution or has been granted the status of a graduate of such an institution; and a candidate who is a graduate of another faculty at the University of Pretoria
  2. Candidates who have completed the National Senior Certificate with admission to degree studies or a certificate of conditional exemption on the basis of a candidate’s international ("foreign") qualifications, the so-called “Immigrant” or “Foreign Conditional Exemption”. The only condition for the “Foreign Conditional Exemption” that is accepted is: ‘completion of the degree course’. The exemption certificate is obtainable from Universities South Africa (USAf). Detailed information is available on the website at mb.usaf.ac.za.
  • Candidates who comply with the minimum subject requirements and achievement levels as well as the APS requirements of these programmes will be granted placement in the programmes, subject to the availability of space. The above-mentioned is not applicable to selection programmes.
  • To retain admission, learners will be expected to obtain an APS of at least 28 in the NSC. Prospective students who have already been granted conditional admission in these programmes, but obtained at least an APS of 26 or 27 in Grade 12, will be considered by the Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Humanities, subject to the availability of space and the results of the National Benchmark Test (NBT).
  • Applicants who meet the minimum APS requirement, but who do not comply with the subject requirements must write the NBT.
  • Life Orientation is excluded when calculating the APS.

Minimum requirements

Achievement level

English Home Language or English First Additional Language

 

APS

NSC/IEB

AS Level

 

5

 

C

 

30

To retain admission candidates are required to obtain an APS of at least 28 and must meet the minimum language requirements. Candidates who obtained an APS of 30 but do not comply with the subject requirement, must write the NBT as soon as possible to secure a place timeously.

*  Cambridge A level candidates who obtained at least a D in the required subjects, will be considered for admission. International Baccalaureate (IB) HL candidates who obtained at least a 4 in the required subjects, will be considered for admission.

 

Other programme-specific information

Note: First year of study - FUNDAMENTAL MODULES
Students who are deemed to be at risk of their level of academic literacy are compelled to take ALL 110 and ALL 125.

Students who are deemed NOT to be at risk of their level of academic literacy are compelled to take language modules to the value of 12 credits from the list of language modules under Academic literacy.

Elective modules
Outline of credits for ELECTIVE MODULES (total = 188):
First year: 88/96 
Second year: 40
Third year: 60    

Elective modules Year level 1
Select four disciplines and do two semester modules (or the credit value thereof) from each of these disclipines.

Elective modules Year level 2
Select two semester modules (or the credit value thereof) from the same subject as for level 1; or select two Economics semester modules at yr level 2 (on condition that EKN 120 was taken and that the prerequisites are complied with) together with one additional module at yr level 2 if the Economics modules' credit value is not 40; or select two Public Administration semester modules at yr level 2 together with one additional module at yr level 2 if the Public Administration modules' credit value is not 40.

Elective modules Year level 3
Select two semester modules (or the credit value thereof) either from the same subject as for yr level 2; or from International Relations; or from Economics together with one additional module at yr level 3 if the Economics modules' credit value is not 60; or from Public Administration together with one additional module at yr level 3 if the Public Administration modules' credit value is not 60.

Note: Language modules leading to mastery of any language/languages may be taken up to third-year level. See the Language groups.

In collaboration with the coordinator, students can select any other appropriate modules as electives from the Faculty of Humanities.
 

Academic literacy
The academic literacy of all students who enrol at the University of Pretoria for the first time and all new students enrolling with the Faculty of Humanities for the first time will be assessed at the start of the academic year by means of their NSC marks.

Students following a degree programme: The NSC Grade 12 English mark will be used to determine whether students in the Faculty of Humanities should register for the academic literacy modules (ALL 110 and ALL 125 ):

  • Home Language: Students with a 4 or lower register for ALL 110 and ALL 125.
  • First Additional Language: Students with a 5 or lower register for ALL 110 and ALL 125.

All students in the Faculty of Humanities who are identified as being at risk in terms of their level of academic literacy, are compelled to obtain at least 12 credits in the academic literacy modules ALL 110 and ALL 125.
All students in the Faculty of Humanities who are not at risk in terms of their level of academic literacy, are compelled to obtain at least 12 credits in language modules:

Department of English
ENG 110 Introduction to literature in English (I) 
ENG 120 Introduction to literature in English (II) 
ENG 118 English for specific purposes 

Departement Afrikaans
AFR 110 Afrikaanse taalkunde en letterkunde 
AFR 120 Afrikaanse taalkunde en letterkunde 
AFR 114 Afrikaans vir sprekers van ander tale (I) 

Department of African Languages
NDE 110 Introduction to isiNdebele grammar – Capita selecta 
* Students who want to take isiNdebele in the second semester, should also register for AFT 121 (African languages literature: Capita selecta)
ZUL 110 IsiZulu for beginners 
ZUL 111 Introduction to isiZulu grammar – Capita selecta 
* Students want to take isiZulu in the second semester, should also register for AFT 121 (African languages literature: Capita selecta)
SEP 110 Sepedi for beginners 
SEP 111 Introduction to Sepedi Grammar – Capita selecta
* Students who want to take Sepedi in the second semester, should also register for AFT 121 (African languages literature: Capita selecta)
STW 110 Setswana for beginners
STW 111 Introduction to Setswana Grammar  – Capita selecta
*Students who want to take Setswana in the second semester, should also register for AFT 121 (African languages literature: Capita selecta)

Department of Modern European Languages
DTS 104 German for beginners 
DTS 113 German: Cultural-professional (1) *Prerequisite: Grade 12 German
FRN 104 French for beginners 
FRN 113 French: Cultural-professional (1) *Prerequisite: Grade 12 French
SPN 101 Spanish for beginners 
SPN 102 Spanish for beginners 
PTG 101 Portuguese for beginners

Department of Ancient Languages and Cultures
HEB 110 Hebrew 
LAT 110 Latin 
GRK 110 Greek

LANGUAGE GROUPS FOR SELECTION IN PROGRAMMES

Note: Consult the yearbook for module-specific requirements/prerequisites by searching for the relevant language module.

Module group 1 – Afrikaans
Year level 1
• As a first language: AFR 110, 120
• For speakers of other languages (also for speakers of other languages who are registered for qualifications in education and law) AFR 114
• For law students (first language): AFR 110 Note: AFR 120 may be taken additionally.
• For students following a programme in education: AFR 110, 120; (first language); AFR 114 (speakers of other languages)

Year level 2
• As a first language: AFR 214, AFR 210 ,220
• For students following a programme in education: AFR 214, AFR 220

Year level 3
• As a first language: AFR 311, 321
• For students following a programme in education: Any modules with alpha codes AFR offered at year level 3.

Module group 2 – English
Year level 1
• For special purposes: ENG 118
• For academic purposes: ENG 110, 120

Year level 2
ENG 210, 220

Year level 3
• ENG 310, 320
• ENG 311, 322

Module group 3 – French
Year level 1
• For beginners: FRN 104, 181 (LLM students)
• Cultural-professional (for students who have passed French in Grade 12): FRN 113, 123

Year level 2
FRN 211, 221

Year level 3
Cultural-professional: FRN 361, 362, 363, 364

Module group 4 – German
Year level 1
• For beginners: DTS 104
• Cultural-professional (for students who have passed German in Grade 12): DTS 113, 123

Year level 2
DTS 211, 221

Year level 3
Cultural-professional: DTS 361, 362, 363, 364

Module group 5 – Greek
Year level 1
GRK 110, 120

Year level 2
GRK 210, 220

Module group 6 – Hebrew
Year level 1
HEB 110, 120

Year level 2
HEB 210, 220

Module group 7 – Latin
Year level 1
LAT 110, 120 (students who passed Latin in Grade 12 may start immediately with Latin at year level 2)

Year level 2
LAT 210, 220

Year level 3
LAT 310, 320

Module group 8 – IsiNdebele
Year level 1
For speakers of isiNdebele as home language or first or second additional language
NDE 110, AFT 121

Year level 2
NDE 210, AFT 220

Year level 3
NDE 310, AFT 320

Module group 9 – IsiZulu
Year level 1
• For beginners: ZUL 110, 120
• For speakers of isiZulu as home language or first or second additional language: ZUL 111, AFT 121

Year level 2
• For students who did ZUL 110, 120 at year level 1: ZUL 210, 220
• For students who did AFT 121: ZUL 111 at year level 1: AFT 220, ZUL 211

Year level 3
ZUL 310, AFT 320

Module group 10 – Sepedi
Year level 1
• For beginners: SEP 110,120
• For speakers of Sepedi as home language or first or second additional language: SEP 111, AFT 121

Year level 2
• For students who did SEP 110, 120 at year level 1: SEP 210, 220
• For students who did AFT 121, SEP 111 at year level 1: AFT 220, SEP 211

Year level 3
SEP 310, AFT 320

Module group 11 – Setswana
Year level 1
• For beginners: STW 110, 120
• For speakers of Setswana as home language or first or second additional language: STW 111, AFT 121

Year level 2
• For students who did STW 110, 120 at year level 1: STW 210, 220
• For students who did AFT 121, STW 111 at year level 1: AFT 220, STW 211

Year level 3
STW 310, AFT 320

Module group 12 – Spanish
Year level 1
For beginners: SPN 101, 102

Year level 2
SPN 211, 221

Year level 3
SPN 311, 321

Module group 13 – Portuguese
Year level 1
• For beginners: PTG 101
• Portuguese language and culture (for students who have passed Portuguese in Gr 12): PTG 113, 123

Year level 2
PTG 211, 221

Year level 3
PTG 311, 321

Minimum credits: 130

Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    An introduction to the study of organised political society at national and international levels with specific reference to political concepts, approaches and methods. The emphasis is on state and governance as frameworks for analysis in light of the salient changes brought about at national and international levels by globalisation. Attention is paid to the corresponding dynamics of regime development, performance and change at national and international levels considering increasing challenges to national sovereignty from within and without states in a context of a growing global agenda dealing with transnational issues and challenges, such as the environment, human rights, development and humanitarian intervention.

     

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Taalkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse sintaksis, fonetiek en taalgeskiedenis. Letterkundekomponent:Inleiding tot die Romankuns Inleiding tot die Drama

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  • Module content:

    *Optional Field school usually in April
    Introduction to Archaeology
    An introduction as to how archaeologists study the past via the artefacts left behind by our ancestors. Basic introduction to archaeological theory and how it has contributed to interpretation of the past is discussed. Topics range from the origins of the human family in Africa over three million years ago to the study of more recent times.  

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  • Module content:

    African and world archaeology
    Africa is the home of humanity in both a biological and cultural sense and we have the artefacts and sites to prove it. Topics range from the famous 3 million year-old Australopithecine ‘Lucy’ ancestor found in Ethiopia to the ‘Out of Africa’ dispersal of modern humans, and the emergence of human symbolism, rock art and the emergence of complex societies at society at Lake Chad (Daima) and southern Africa (Mapungubwe and Great Zimbabwe). The main aim is to situate events in Africa in global perspective. 

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  • Module content:

    An introduction to the ancient world I: the ancient Near East
    Various facets of the ancient Mesopotamian, Syria-Palestinian and Egyptian cultures are dealt with in broad outline. Examples that are dealt with can include the following, namely geography, worldviews, history, literature, daily life, customs, values, religion and mythology. Examples of ancient cultures whose characteristics can be investigated range from the Sumerians, the Assyrians, the Babylonians, the Persians, the Canaanites, the Israelites and the Egyptians from their origin Before the Common Era to the beginning of the Common Era.

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  • Module content:

    An introduction to the ancient world II: the Greek and Roman worlds
    Various facets of the ancient Greek and Roman cultures are dealt with in broad outline. Examples that are dealt with can include the following, namely geography, worldview, history, literature, daily life, customs, values, religion and mythology. These classical societies are investigated from their origin Before the Common Era into the Common Era.

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  • Module content:

    This introduction to social anthropology introduces basic themes of the discipline including ritual, religion, marriage and sex. It combines classic studies with recent scholarship, and asks the ‘big question’ about human society and human cultures that offer challenging perspectives on the world we live in.

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  • Module content:

    This module builds on the ethnographic and theoretical themes introduced in APL 110, asking particular questions about how we may think about the relationship between the local and the global; indigenous and universal; public and private; the real and the possible.The module continues in the vein of APL 110, in that it explicitly encourages students to understand the society in which they live through a series of critical anthropological perspectives.

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  • Module content:

    This module deals with the core principles of economics. A distinction between macroeconomics and microeconomics is made. A discussion of the market system and circular flow of goods, services and money is followed by a section dealing with microeconomic principles, including demand and supply analysis, consumer behaviour and utility maximisation, production and the costs thereof, and the different market models and firm behaviour. Labour market institutions and issues, wage determination, as well as income inequality and poverty are also addressed. A section of money, banking, interest rates and monetary policy concludes the course.

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  • Module content:

    This module deals with the core principles of economics, especially macroeconomic measurement the private and public sectors of the South African economy receive attention, while basic macroeconomic relationships and the measurement of domestic output and national income are discussed. Aggregate demand and supply analysis stands core to this course which is also used to introduce students to the analysis of economic growth, unemployment and inflation. The microeconomics of government is addressed in a separate section, followed by a section on international economics, focusing on international trade, exchange rates and the balance of payments. The economics of developing countries and South Africa in the global economy conclude the course.

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  • Module content:

    *Alternative evening classes - 2 discussion classes per week Introduction to Literature in English (1) This module introduces the study of literature by examining a number of texts representing different genres (poetry, prose, drama). The texts studied here will be mainly from the pre-twentieth century era and may include texts written in English from both Africa and other parts of the world. The aim of this module is to equip students with the critical and analytical skills required for a perceptive reading of poetry, novels and plays.

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  • Module content:

    *Alternative evening classes: 2 discussion classes per week
    Introduction to Literature in English (2)
    This module introduces the study of post-nineteenth century literature by examining a number of texts representing different genres (poetry, drama, prose). Texts will be from both Africa and other parts of the world. By the end of this module students should have the background and analytical skills to perceptively read modern and contemporary poetry, novels and plays.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to Philosophy

    The two semester modules at first-year level introduce students to four main subfields of philosophy, namely metaphysics, epistemology, ontology and ethics. This module introduces students to two of these subfields, namely epistemology and metaphysics with reference to the work of a range of scholars from the Global South and the West. Students will become acquainted with the nature of philosophical reflection by exploring a number of classical philosophical themes in each subfield. Throughout the module there is an emphasis on developing those critical thinking, reading and writing skills that are required in Philosophy, while students become acquainted with the power of critique as critical judgment and discernment.

     

     

     

     

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to Philosophy

    The two semester modules at first-year level introduce students to four main subfields of philosophy, namely metaphysics, epistemology, ontology and ethics. This module introduces students to two of these subfields, namely ontology and ethics and the emphasis is on texts by African and Western scholars. Students will become acquainted with the nature of philosophical reflection by exploring a number of classical philosophical themes in each subfield. Throughout the module there is an emphasis on developing those critical thinking, reading and writing skills that are required in Philosophy, while students become acquainted with the power of critique as critical judgment and discernment.

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  • Module content:

    The making of the Modern World: a survey
    A selection of themes on Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe and their contribution to the making of the Modern World.

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  • Module content:

    Africa and South Africa: a survey
    An overview focusing on the making of African and South African societies from the earliest times to the present with emphasis on the most significant historical forces, factors and events.

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  • Module content:

    Greek grammar (1)
    The basic characteristics of Hellenistic Greek: the writing system and pronunciation, the Greek verb and noun systems, conjugation and declension, basic syntax and vocabulary. Passages from the Greek New Testament are adapted as exercises in order to facilitate linguistic proficiency. Continuous evaluation includes class tests and homework assignments.
    Greek grammar (2)
    Further study of the verb and noun systems of Hellenistic Greek, expansion of the basic vocabulary, and analysis of compound sentences. Adapted passages from the New Testament form the core of practical academic literacy exercises.

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  • Module content:

    Greek grammar (3)
    Further study of the verb and noun systems of Hellenistic Greek: middle and passive forms, the third declension, and analysis of compound sentences. Adapted passages from the New Testament form the core of practical academic literacy exercises.
    Greek texts: Read and comprehend
    Read selected texts from the NT and/or Apostolic Fathers, with emphasis on word analysis, basic translation, use of basic aids (dictionary, translations). Evaluation includes translation of unseen passages from the corpuses concerned.

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  • Module content:

    Hebrew grammar (1)
    Basic principles of the grammar of classical Hebrew: signs of writing and pronunciation, Hebrew morphology, the nominal and verbal system, basic syntax and vocabulary. Exercise basic competence by means of the analysis and translation of selected passages from the Hebrew Old Testament.
    Hebrew grammar (2)
    More advanced principles of the grammar of classical Hebrew: the function of nouns, verbs and particles, the derived formations of the verb. Passages from the Hebrew Old Testament from the basis for exercising academic literacy.

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  • Module content:

    Hebrew grammar (3)
    Continued study of the Hebrew verbal system: the irregular and weak verbs. Passages from the Hebrew Old Testament from the basis for students’ exercise in academic literacy.
    Hebrew texts: Read and comprehend
    Read selected texts from the OT, with emphasis on word analysis, basic translation, use of basic aids (dictionary, translations). Evaluation includes translation of unseen passages.

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  • Module content:

    This module is an introduction to the study field of information science and its various professions. Key concepts that will be discussed include the following: the human as information processor and user; the life-cycle of information in terms of processes, products and role-players; as well as the communication of information. The social-ethical impact of globalisation is included as a key concern, with reference to Africa.

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  • Module content:

    Organisation and representation of information. This module provides the student with an introduction to the basic principles and processes underlying the organisation and representation of information. The process of organising information in documents and on the web, in multimedia formats, by means of document image processing and in databases are dealt with. Themes on the representation of information through the creation of metadata include various general and domain specific metadata schemas such as Dublin Core as a metadata standard for the Web, as well as various other metadata schemas.
    Practical classes include basic HTML and the design of Web pages incorporating and applying what was covered in theory.

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  • Module content:

    Personal information management. This module focuses on personal information management within an organisational context. It deals with managing information and knowledge that is peculiar to an individual and which enables him/her to perform his/her job.
    Topics include: creating an environment in which the individual can manage his/her information and knowledge; the skills needed to be able to manage personal information and knowledge; information overloading which gives rise to personal information and knowledge management, as well as the manner in which individuals can switch from personal information management to personal knowledge management; personal information and knowledge management as a career.

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  • Module content:

    Information and communication technology. This module offers a brief overview of hardware and software, telecommunications technology, LANs, WANs and intranets, the information highway, the internet and the World Wide Web, computer ethics, ICTs, e-commerce, mobile computing technology and the influence that new trends and developments have on the distribution of information.

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  • Module content:

    *Not for students who passed Latin in Gr 12
    Latin grammar and reading (1) and (2)
    Basic characteristics and use of classical Latin: the verb and noun in Latin (conjugation and declension), basic syntax, as well as vocabulary; exercises in grammar and reading; relevant social, political and historical background.
    Continued study of accidence and syntax; further basic vocabulary. More adapted Latin passages to facilitate academic literacy.

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  • Module content:

    *Not for students who passed Latin in Gr 12
    Latin grammar and reading (3) and (4)
    Continued study of accidence and syntax: further basic vocabulary. More adapted Latin passages to facilitate academic literacy.
    The student’s knowledge and understanding of Latin accidence, syntax and vocabulary is extended further. The emphasis is now more on reading passages and analysing them grammatically and syntactically.

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  • Module content:

    For speakers of isiNdebele as home language or first or second additional language.
    Aspects of the grammar of isiNdebele such as an introduction to the word categories; an introduction to the structure, meaning and use of the noun, the adjective, the relative, the possessive; the verb; writing and spelling rules; dictionaries and dictionary use; grammatical analysis.

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  • Module content:

    This module in public administration is designed specifically to assist students in understanding the role of public administration in a modern state, the unique characteristics of public administration, the schools and approaches in public administration and introducing the various generic administrative functions. The discipline of public administration has developed rapidly and by implication, has changed and shifted its paradigm over the years. The purpose of this module is to introduce public administration to the student as a field of study that makes a significant contribution to the effective administration and management of government institutions.

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  • Module content:

    This module in public administration will introduce the constitutional framework pertaining to public administration. The South African system of government, the functions, role and powers of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of government as well as the functioning of the three spheres of government will be discussed. The module will enable the student to understand how and where public administration is practiced.

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  • Module content:

    *For absolute beginners only.
    *Only students from the School of Healthcare Sciences and Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology may take this module during semester 2. All other students must  take this module during semester 1. Also note that students from the School of Healthcare Sciences, who already possess the language skills taught in this module, may write an exemption examination.
    The acquisition of basic Sepedi communicative skills with emphasis on everyday expressions and suitable high frequency vocabulary, within specific social situations.

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  • Module content:

    Sepedi - communication and grammar
    The acquisition of more advanced communication skills in further social situations. More extensive vocabulary and more advanced language structures are acquired and used. Further awareness of the nature and function of language structures. Writing and spelling rules. Dictionaries and dictionary use. Reading and comprehension of basic texts.

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  • Module content:

    Invitation to Sociology
    How do we understand ourselves as individuals in relation to society? How are our individual life courses and large-scale processes of social and historical change related to each other? How have our societies come to be what they are today? And how can we think of our private troubles as public issues? These questions are at the very heart of sociology as a distinctive way of thinking about and understanding the social worlds that we inhabit. This module invites students to become familiar with sociological ways of thinking about current issues and personal experiences (particularly in the southern African context), and to develop the analytical skills that are necessary in order to ask and answer critical questions about the communities, society, and world that they live in. The module will include a specific emphasis on academic reading skills.

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  • Module content:

    Thinking sociologically
    Drawing from the idea of Sociology as a discipline that focuses on critical thinking, the module will introduce students to ways of questioning the obvious and the taken-for-granted. In particular, power and inequality will be problematised, with a focus on how power operates to structure racial, class and gender inequalities across institutions, ideologies and identities. The module will introduce students to the operations of power as manifested in the production of institutions, the proliferation of identities and heightened contestations among ideologies. The module will include a specific emphasis on writing skills.

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  • Module content:

    * For absolute beginners only.

    The acquisition of basic Setswana communicative skills with emphasis on everyday expressions and suitable high frequency vocabulary within specific social situations.
     

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  • Module content:

    Setswana – communication and grammar
    The acquisition of more advanced communication skills in further social situations. More extensive vocabulary and more advanced language structures are acquired and used. Further awareness of the nature and function of language structures. Writing and spelling rules. Dictionaries and dictionary use. Reading and comprehension of basic texts.

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  • Module content:

    Foundations of visual culture
    This module introduces art and visual culture theory using a wide range of texts and ideas. The module gives students wide exposure to visual discourses and includes a variety of visual culture examples e.g. artworks, advertisements. These discourses may include:  exploring what visual culture is; modes of analysis; introducing terminology such as ideology and myth; dealing with selected periods from history contextually; introducing cultural icons and themes from popular visual culture.

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  • Module content:

    Images across media: current issues
    This module presents an introduction into the ways in which images appear across media in contemporary visual culture from a specific African perspective within the global. This is done by means of exploring key modes, themes, genres, platforms and visual texts. Among the media and mediums that may be covered are photography, art, graphic design, advertising, film, documentaries, video, digital and social media. 

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  • Module content:

    *For absolute beginners only
    *Only students from the School of Healthcare Sciences and Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology may take this module during semester 2. All other students must take this module during semester 1. Students from the School of Healthcare Sciences, who already possess the language skills taught in this module, may write an exemption examination.
    The acquisition of basic isiZulu communicative skills with emphasis on everyday expressions and suitable high frequency vocabulary, within specific situations.

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  • Module content:

    isiZulu - communication and grammar
    The acquisition of more advanced communication skills in further social situations. More extensive vocabulary and more advanced language structures are acquired and used. Further awareness of the nature and function of language structures. Writing and spelling rules. Dictionaries and dictionary use. Reading and comprehension of basic texts

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Minimum credits: 120

Core modules

  • Module content:

    International theory and organisation
    What causes war and peace? Can international order and justice be reconciled? Does the international structure matter? The answers depend on the theoretical lenses through which world politics are viewed. An overview is provided of competing theoretical perspectives of international relations. It includes mainstream and alternative perspectives, as well as the underlying ideas, theories and variants of each. These theories also propose different approaches to global peace, amongst others peace through international organisation. A comprehensive analysis is made of selected international organisations with a universal or regional scope, such as the United Nations, the African Union and the Southern African Development Community, and of international law that underpins these organisations and their activities.

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  • Module content:

    Foreign policy and diplomacy
    A short introduction to the study of foreign policy is followed by an explanation of the use of the comparative method and a framework for foreign policy analysis and evaluation. This allows for a comparative study of the foreign policies of selected states from the major regions of the world, amongst others of South African foreign policy. In each case study the policy environment, the formulation and implementation processes, as well as the substance of the particular state’s foreign policy are covered. Thereafter the focus narrows to diplomacy: the oldest, most versatile and universally used instrument of foreign policy. The nature, history, modes of diplomacy and legal framework of the institution are explored. Examples are drawn from global practice, with specific consideration of the evolution of diplomatic practice within the African and South African context.

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  • Module content:

    Political dynamics (Micro)
    The study of the theory and practice of behavioural phenomena in politics. With reference to appropriate examples, the emphasis is on the study of political culture, leadership, communication, interests groups, parties and party systems; on elections, electoral systems, voting behaviour; and on public opinion and direct popular control techniques.

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  • Module content:

    Political dynamics (Macro)
    A theoretical basis and framework is provided for the description, analysis and classification of political and policy problems. The emphasis is on the nature of the state, governance and conflict in Africa. Amongst others a study is made of the issues of colonialism and post-colonialism, democratisation, authoritarianism and the development of the state in Africa, in the context of a globalising world.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Afrikaanse prosa
    Literatuurteorie en -kritiek

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  • Module content:

    Aspects of the literature of isiNdebele/isiZulu/Sepedi/Setswana such as the continuation of the study of concepts such as text, topic, characters, events, time and place; the study of plot and style; the critical analysis of a novel/novelette.

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  • Module content:

    Interpretation of written remains
    A selection of ancient Near Eastern (namely Mesopotamian, Syria-Palestinian and Egyptian) and ancient Greek and Roman myths and typical mythological themes are studied against their proper cultural and historical background. Some of the different methods of interpretation for myths that will be dealt with include ancient and current approaches. This is done in order to indicate ancient myths’ influence on contemporary society.

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  • Module content:

    Interpretation of material remains
    The physical remains of the ancient Near East (namely Mesopotamia, Syria-Palestine and Egypt) and the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, namely artefacts and architecture, are examined within their socio-historical context to interpret the physical representations of their worldviews. Contemporary society’s interaction with material remains of the ancient world will also be examined.

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  • Module content:

    Cultural constructions of sex and sexuality are the primary building blocks of social organisation. Anthropological discussions of sexuality tend to revolve around the various aspects of social organisation, such as the lifecycle, gendered identities, and personhood. These discussions are informed by the cultural meanings we impute to differences in biological sex and reproduction, and the ways in which these meanings influence social organisation, personhood, and power. In this module, we will consider cultural constructions of sex and sexuality as these inform certain aspects of social organisation such as kinship and marriage. We will attempt to develop an anthropological perspective on the interplay between sex, culture and society. To this end, we will examine the physiology of sexuality, and then consider different theoretical perspectives on human sexuality as reflected in cross-cultural ethnographic case studies.

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  • Module content:

    Power and wealth
    This module explores anthropological perspectives on politics, power and wealth in colonial and postcolonial contexts.  Key concepts that are discussed include anthropological approaches to citizenship, cosmopolitanism, hegemony, human rights, neoliberalism, sovereignty, civil society, gender, race and class.

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  • Module content:

    Macroeconomics
    From Wall and Bay Street to Diagonal Street: a thorough understanding of the mechanisms and theories explaining the workings of the economy is essential. Macroeconomic insight is provided on the real market, the money market, two market equilibrium, monetarism, growth theory, cyclical analysis, inflation, Keynesian general equilibrium analysis and fiscal and monetary policy issues.

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  • Module content:

    Microeconomics
    Microeconomic insight is provided into: consumer and producer theory, general microeconomic equilibrium, Pareto-optimality and optimality of the price mechanism, welfare economics, market forms and the production structure of South Africa. Statistic and econometric analysis of microeconomic issues.

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  • Module content:

    *Alternative evening classes - 3 discussion classes per week
    Modern English literature and English language studies
    This module focuses on post-nineteenth century literature in English as well as on historical and theoretical aspects of the English language.

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  • Module content:

    *Alternative evening classes - 3 discussion classes per week
    Twentieth-century, postcolonial and contemporary literature
    This module focuses on post-nineteenth century literature in English. Various genres are covered and particular attention is given to postcolonial writing.

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  • Module content:

    This module engages the historical emergence of modern African philosophy in relation to the Western canon. The first module traces the history of modern western philosophy as the history of different conceptions of First Philosophy – from the claim that it is epistemology (Aristotle through eg. Kant and Hegel), to ontology (eg Heidegger), to the ethical (eg. Levinas) to the claim that it is the political (eg Grosfoguel, Mignolo). The second module traces the historical process through which the modern African subject is constituted in a struggle for recognition with reference to the work of theorists such as Hegel, Du Bois, Fanon and others.

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  • Module content:

    In this module contextually relevant aspects of human reality are reflected on through philosophy considered as practical activity. Students will engage issues of socio-political relevance in contemporary (South) Africa, the Global South and beyond. The focus is on key themes and texts in debates of contemporary relevance and may include issues from any of the sub-disciplines of philosophy such as political philosophy, moral philosophy and philosophy of science. 

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  • Module content:

    A selection of themes on the history of Africa and its people in the recent past that shaped the African historical experience.

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  • Module content:

    The development of South Africa through segregation and apartheid to democracy.

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  • Module content:

    Greek texts – syntax
    Basic syntactical theory and application to selected Greek texts
    Greek prose – text analysis
    Basic theory of comprehensive text analysis and application of selected NT prose texts.

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  • Module content:

    Greek poetry – text analysis
    Basic theory of poetic text analysis and application of selected NT and related poetry texts.
    Greek texts – holistic analysis
    Students are guided towards reading and analysing independently chosen Greek texts by application of all knowledge and skills acquired in GRK modules on year level 1 as well as in GRK 210 and 220.

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  • Module content:

    Hebrew texts – syntax
    Basic syntactical theory and application to selected Hebrew texts.
    Hebrew prose – text analysis
    Basic theory of comprehensive text analysis and application to selected OT prose texts.

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  • Module content:

    Hebrew poetry – text analysis
    Basic theory of poetic text analysis and application to selected OT poetic texts. Hebrew texts – holistic analysis
    Students are guided towards reading and analysing independently chosen Hebrew texts by application of all knowledge and skills acquired in HEB modules on year level 1 as well as in HEB 210 and 220.

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  • Module content:

    Information seeking and retrieval. This module explores the theory and practice of effective information seeking and retrieval. It builds on supporting research paradigms such as the systems, user-centred, cognitive and socio-cognitive paradigms. The focus is on the complexities of effective information seeking and retrieval within the context of information behaviour on a personal level, as well as in the context of professional, academic or everyday information needs.

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  • Module content:

    Representation and organisation. Information needs to be represented and organised in a system for it to be effectively retrievable. This module deals with the representation and organisation of information on the level of individual entities (e.g. indexing), from the perspective of the users (user profiling), as well as within a document collection (taxonomies and ontologies).

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  • Module content:

    User studies and dissemination. This module focuses on the individual as seeker, user, reader and communicator of information. Various user groups are identified and their information use and communication patterns and requirements are analysed and investigated. This module covers methods of service provision to facilitate and enhance the use and dissemination of information in accordance with the user's needs.

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  • Module content:

    Social and ethical impact. This module examines moral and legal regulation practices related to information in print and digital environments. Different ethical theories are identified and applied to privacy, access to information, information poverty and censorship. The interpretation and enforcement of rules and regulations are discussed.

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  • Module content:

    Economics and politics of information. This module examines the economics and politics of information, with a special emphasis on South Africa's information sector. It aims to promote an understanding of the market and non-market qualities of information, and their consequences for the production, distribution and marketing of information goods and services. The ways in which information access and expression are regulated and the use of ICTs in crime and corruption is also addressed.

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  • Module content:

    Indigenous knowledge and communication. This module focuses on the role and function of Indigenous Knowledge (IK) in the information and knowledge society. Various categories and contexts of IK are explored within international and local perspectives.
    Issues pertaining to access and communication of IK, inter alia through Information and Communication Technology (ICT), are addressed in order to ensure sustainable development.

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  • Module content:

    Latin literature, grammar and history (1) and (2)
    Selected passages from Latin literature, including legal and patristic texts; Latin grammar.
    An introduction to Roman history
    Selected passages of prose and poetry. Latin grammar. Roman history and constitution.

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  • Module content:

    Latin literature, grammar and history (3) and (4)
    Selected passages of prose and poetry. Latin grammar. Roman history and constitution. History of Latin literature.

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  • Module content:

    Aspects of the grammar of isiNdebele such as a continuation of the study of the word categories; grammatical analysis; the structure, meaning and use of the pronoun and the enumerative; an introduction to isiNdebele speech sounds/phonetics.

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  • Module content:

    This module in public administration constitutes an in-depth analysis of the generic administrative functions, including, policy making, organising, financing, staffing and control. Students will thus be equipped with knowledge and skills related to government strategic planning, policy-making and decision-making, budgeting, public procurement, human resource management functions and employment legislation impacting on human resources within public organisations.

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  • Module content:

    This module in public administration introduces the student to the process of planning, executing and evaluating research in the public sector. Students will be enabled to identify, plan, execute and present a research project. This is a service learning module and as such students will be expected to complete approximately 15 hours service learning and submit a portfolio as part of their formal assessment.

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  • Module content:

    Investigating the method of Phenomenology as way of studying religions. Focussing on African Christianity and the phenomenon of African Independent Churches. Highlighting Prosperity Theology as phenomenon in Africa. Exploring the place of land, water and the city within religion in Africa

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  • Module content:

    Ancient religions and Health:
    Exploring ancient religions (Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Zoroastranism, Aztec, Inca and Mayan) and health. Exploring the San religious treatment of health matters. The relationship magic and religion is investigated.

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  • Module content:

    The relation Religion and Culture:
    Central topics are inter religious Ethics and cultural sensitivity towards social taboos. Political and economic matters as interpreted form a religious perspective is investigated. Religion in the education system is addressed.

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  • Module content:

    Sepedi - communication and grammar
    The acquisition of advanced communication skills in further social, occupational and educational situations. More extensive vocabulary and advanced language structures are acquired and used. Heightened awareness of the nature and function of language structures.
    Sepedi - reading and writing
    Writing of coherent, idiomatic and grammatically correct texts in order to impart ideas and information for a selected range of communicative purposes. Writing entails creative writing as well as reduplication. Reading and comprehension of texts which contain reasonably extensive vocabularies and a relatively large variation of language structures. Commence with the reading of fairly simple literary works. Students are also further trained in the use of the dictionary.

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  • Module content:

    Aspects of the grammar of Sepedi such as a continuation of the study of the word categories; grammatical analysis; the structure, meaning and use of the pronoun and the enumerative; an introduction to Sepedi speech sounds/phonetics.

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  • Module content:

    Sepedi  -  communication, grammar, reading and writing
    The further acquisition of advanced communication skills in further social, occupational and educational situations. More extensive vocabulary and advanced language structures are acquired and used. Heightened awareness of the nature and function of language structures. Continuation of the writing of coherent, idiomatic and grammatically correct texts in order to impart ideas and information for a range of communicative purposes. An introduction to Sepedi speech sounds / phonetics.  Reading and comprehension of texts which contain more extensive vocabularies and a larger variation of language structures. Reading of further literary works.

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  • Module content:

    Industrial sociology
    This module addresses sociological approaches to the workplace. Its focus is on theories of work and the current themes and debates within the sociology of work with an emphasis on exploring these issues from a southern perspective. Some of the themes that will be covered include the theorisation and conceptualisation of work, work in industrialising societies, workplace restructuring and reorganisation, flexibility in the labour market, changing technologies and the implications for work and employment, and new forms of work (including atypical work, service work, emotional labour, professional work).

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  • Module content:

    Urban sociology and social movements
    This module considers the relationship between the rural and urban, against the backdrop of the emergence and development of both capitalism in its various guises and globalisation within the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in the global North and South. Questions on the nature of social interaction in communities, changing ways of relating, inequality and livelihoods, collective action, local cultures and modernities are considered. With migration to the city spurred by the communication revolution, the city has become a source of aspirations and illusions. A key issue in place-space configurations is the dialectic between citizenship and cosmopolitanism (aligned to individualism and multiple identities), on the one hand, and the experience of community (aligned to a collectivity) on the other hand. The debate on who belongs to the city highlights both symbolic and material issues and a politics around access to rights and resources, and therefore a possibility of mobilisation. Contemporary themes such as informality, different forms of local participation and consumption are considered.

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  • Module content:

    Culture and religion in the construction of identities: Gender, sexuality and race
    The global proliferation of identities is explored through the lens of social categories of difference. The convergence of ideologies and institutions in the construction of identities at the intersections of gender, sexuality and race is examined with a particular emphasis on modern African identities, drawing on the sub-disciplines of the sociology of religion and cultural sociology.

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  • Module content:

    Demography, health and society
    This module will use intersectional and critical lenses to provide students with a broad understanding of how demographic and social factors affect population health and medical care across a range of contexts. The main theoretical underpinnings and debates, as well as basic measures of each construct will be covered to operationalise the constructs for the purposes of practical application in sociological research and understanding. The focus will be comparative, both across time and between developed and less developed societies in general and South African societies in particular.

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  • Module content:

    Gender, sexuality and visual representation
    Introduction to the representation of sex, gender and sexuality in visual culture.  Gender theory and terminology related to feminism, masculinity studies and lbgtq theory (lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgendered, queer) are unpacked. Themes and issues in gender and identity politics such as the male hero, the nude in late 19th century art, the femme fatale, hysteria, androgyny and transsexuality are dealt with. Sexuality and gender issues across a range of visual cultural such as soaps, sitcoms, artworks, advertisements, fashion, music videos and films are addressed.

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  • Module content:

    Visual (Post)colonialisms
    This module investigates aspects of Africanness, Afrocentrism, multiculturalism, transnationalism and the African diaspora and studies a cross section of work including traditional art, tourist art and the hybrid aesthetics of contemporary African art and visual culture. The module also focuses on the ideology of imperialism and colonialism and its influence on art and visual culture from the nineteenth century onwards. The influence of postcolonial thinking on the deconstruction of the ideology of colonialism is highlighted with reference to landscape and memory, the exotic and primitivism in South African visual culture.

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  • Module content:

    isiZulu - communication and grammar
    The acquisition of advanced communication skills in further social, occupational and educational situations. More extensive vocabulary and advanced language structures are acquired and used. Heightened awareness of the nature and function of language structures.
    isiZulu -  reading and writing
    Writing of coherent, idiomatic and grammatically correct texts in order to impart ideas and information for a selected range of communicative purposes. Writing entails creative writing as well as reduplication. Reading and comprehension of texts which contain reasonably extensive vocabularies and a relatively large variation of language structures. Commence with the reading of fairly simple literary works. Students are also further trained in the use of the dictionary.

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  • Module content:

    Aspects of the grammar of isiZulu such as a continuation of the study of the word categories; grammatical analysis; the structure, meaning and use of the pronoun and the enumerative; an introduction to isiZulu speech sounds/phonetics.

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  • Module content:

    isiZulu - communication, grammar, reading and writing
    The further acquisition of advanced communication skills in further social, occupational and educational situations. More extensive vocabulary and advanced language structures are acquired and used. Heightened awareness of the nature and function of language structures. Continuation of the writing of coherent, idiomatic and grammatically correct texts in order to impart ideas and information for a range of communicative purposes. An introduction to isiZulu speech sounds/phonetics.  Reading and comprehension of texts which contain more extensive vocabularies and a larger variation of language structures. Reading of further literary works.

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Minimum credits: 120

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Political theory
    A theoretical and normative study of political ideas. This includes the study of key political thinkers such as Plato, Thomas Hobbes and John Rawls as well as the contemporary manifestations of ideologies such as liberalism, socialism, conservatism and nationalism. This normative assessment of politics concludes with a critical evaluation of the development, nature and practical value of prominent democratic theories including participatory, legal, and deliberative democracy.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Democratic studies
    A high level critical analysis of democratic theory and practice. The analysis of democratic theory will include themes such as classical, radical, deliberative and feminist perspectives. The analysis of democratic practice will include aspects such as democratisation, democratic consolidation, democratic citizenship and society, the role and importance of civil society, the institutions and procedures for democracy and “good governance”.
    Part 2: Political analysis
    The methods and practice of political analysis is the focus of study. The principles and problems underpinning different approaches and methods of political analysis are described and explained. This includes the nature, methods and use of comparative analysis, forecasting, risk analysis, performance evaluation and the political audit. These analytical methods are positioned in a political and policy context, with emphasis on practical application. Applicable examples and case studies are used throughout.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Taalkundekomponent
    Capita selecta uit die Afrikaanse taalkunde
    Letterkundekomponent
    Afrikaanse prosa

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  • Module content:

    Afrikaanse poësie
    'n Keuse uit eietydse Nederlandstalige literatuur; analitiese teksondersoeke met aandag aan agtergrond- en resepsieaangeleenthede.
    Die Afrikaanse drama word binne die breër konteks van die Afrikaanse letterkunde geplaas.

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  • Module content:

    Social aspects of the ancient Near Eastern and the ancient Greek and Roman worlds
    A selection of ancient Near Eastern (namely Mesopotamian, Syria-Palestinian and Egyptian) and ancient Greek and Roman sources are studied within their socio-historical context to illustrate and interpret these cultures and social practises and how they influenced contemporary institutions and social structures.

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  • Module content:

    Verbal and visual expression in the ancient world: looking for answers
    This module entails an overview of the research process in ancient culture studies, especially the identification of a research problem, formulating a research question, proposing a suitable hypothesis and applying suitable research strategies through the discussion of relevant themes on the ancient world. Students are then guided towards independent research on themes of their choice relating to departmental research interests by applying the knowledge and skills gained throughout the entire course of ancient culture studies.

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  • Module content:

    This module considers the colonial histories of anthropology in Africa and their impact on traditions of knowledge production in the discipline to propose a decolonised anthropology. It does so by critically reflecting on old and contemporary ethnographies from and about the African continent and pays particular attention to ethnographic methods, politics of representation, reflexivity, power and identity as pertinent questions to establish a decolonised anthropology. Students in this module are encouraged to imagine a decolonised anthropology in and for Africa. 

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  • Module content:

    Fieldwork, ethnography and theory
    This module reviews themes such as conducting fieldwork, writing ethnography and developing theory in anthropology.  The module allows the opportunity to gain experience with ethnographic field methods in order to develop insight into the implications of methodological choices and their relationship to research questions and settings.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1:Texts in context
    OT texts are read in their Ancient Near Eastern context with special reference to intra-, inter- and extratextual relations. NT and/or Patristic texts are read in their Jewish and Hellenistic context with special reference to intra-, inter- and extra-textual relations.
    Part 2: Between the Testaments
    Reading and interpreting of Hebrew and Greek inter-testamental literature, including Qumran literature, Ben Sira and Greek apocryphal books like Judit or Tobit.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Critical textual competence
    Students are exposed to diverging translations and interpretations of selected OT and NT texts. Through their own knowledge of and competence in intra-, inter-  and extratextual analysis they are guided towards critical assessment of diverging points of view and independent decision making in the reading, analysis and understanding of ancient literary texts.
    Part 2: Integration of analytical skills
    Students are guided towards independent reading and analysis of chosen Greek and Hebrew texts by integrated application of all knowledge and skills acquired in GRK and HEB modules on year levels 1 and 2, as well as in BYT 251, 310 and 320.

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  • Module content:

    Public finance
    Role of government in the economy. Welfare economics and theory of optimality. Ways of correcting market failures. Government expenditure theories, models and programmes. Government revenue. Models on taxation, effects of taxation on the economy. Assessment of taxation from an optimality and efficiency point of view. South African perspective on public finance.

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  • Module content:

    International trade/finance
    International economic insight is provided into international economic relations and history, theory of international trade, international capital movements, international trade politics, economic and customs unions and other forms or regional cooperation and integration, international monetary relations, foreign exchange markets, exchange rate issues and the balance of payments, as well as open economy macroeconomic issues.

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  • Module content:

    Economic analyses
    Identification, collection and interpretation process of relevant economic data; the national accounts (i.e. income and production accounts, the national financial account, the balance of payments and input-output tables); economic growth; inflation; employment, unemployment, wages, productivity and income distribution; business cycles; financial indicators; fiscal indicators; social indicators; international comparisons; relationships between economic time series - regression analysis; long-term future studies and scenario analysis; overall assessment of the South African economy from 1994 onwards.

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  • Module content:

    Economic policy and development: Capita select
    The course provides an introduction to growth economics and also to some topics on development economics. Firstly, historical evidence is covered and then the canonical Solow growth model and some of its empirical applications (human capital and convergence). Secondly, the new growth theory (the AK and the Romer models of endogenous growth) are covered. Some of the development topics to be covered include technology transfer, social infrastructure and natural resources.

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  • Module content:

    Reading Medieval and Early Modern literature
    In this module students study the works of  writers such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and Pope. The general characteristics and techniques of these authors are discussed in relation to developments in aesthetic theory, generic conventions and socio-historical change.

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  • Module content:

    Reading the Nineteenth Century
    In this module students read a  selection of 19th-century texts in English. The general characteristics and techniques of these texts are discussed in relation to developments in aesthetic theory, generic conventions and socio-historical change.

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  • Module content:

    In this module the focus is on understanding humankind and its relation to reality and knowledge. The focus of the module as a whole is philosophical anthropology or contemporary metaphysics, and it trraces the development of the conceptions of ‘self’ and ‘subjectivity’ in any given philosophical tradition in Africa, the West or more generally the Global South by focussing on questions such as the relation between consciousness, self-consciousness and the human unconscious; the meaning of life; the nature of personal identity and the issue of free will. 

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  • Module content:

    In this module students will philosophically engage issues of socio-political relevance in contemporary (South) Africa, the Global South and beyond. A range of themes may be investigated, such as structure and agency, social imaginaries, new social formations, institutional cultures, gender and sexuality, subject constitution, and others. These issues will be be framed in a spectrum of approaches that may include Critical Theory, Theory of Ideology, Contractarianism, Social Action Theory, and Critical Race Theory. 

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  • Module content:

    Historical trends in the modern world
    A selection of political, economic and social themes.

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  • Module content:

    Interpreting the process of global change. Explaining the debates and the origin and nature of globalisation and its significance.

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  • Module content:

    Information Organisation. The module is concerned with the organisation of information in the digital environment focusing on the structure and use of document management and workflow systems, as well as distribution channels and virtual environments. The characteristics and application of the internet, intranets, as well as portals and applications use, are considered.

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  • Module content:

    Information and Knowledge Management. This module focuses on information and knowledge management at an operational level and introduces information and knowledge management at a corporate strategic level. It deals with the management of information and knowledge, which enables the organisation to be competitive. In this module the focus is on four aspects, namely: the 21st century organisation, the external and internal stakeholders that have an interest in information products, as well as the infrastructure that should be in place in organisations to manage information products. The module concludes with a few topics relating to information management at a corporate strategic level.

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  • Module content:

    This module deals with the construction and management of digital repositories. It also addresses the characteristics of the digital repository in a rapidly changing technological world and a challenging information society. Core aspects include: system design, relationships to hybrid libraries, digital collections and rights management, standards, virtual referencing and the development and evaluation of digital repositories.

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  • Module content:

    This module examines aspects of the information and knowledge society within local, regional and international contexts. A special focus of the module is the interaction and exchange of data, information and knowledge from communities' local knowledge system with data, information and knowledge from the global knowledge system. The module discusses the growth and role of information and communication technologies (ICTs), and their implications for development.

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  • Module content:

    This module provides an overview of Competitive Intelligence (CI) and focuses on the needs for CI in organisations. The ways in which organisations compete and the benefits that CI can bring to these organisations will also be covered. The growing need for CI among South African organisations will also be examined. Practical examples and case studies will be used to highlight the value of CI in organisations.

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  • Module content:

    International political economy
    The nature and functioning of the international contemporary political-economic order are analysed against the background of the process of globalisation. The focus is on the interaction of political and economic trends and issues such as the economic importance and political impact of regional trade blocs; the debt burden of states; international aid; the role and influence of multinational corporations; and the transfer of technology to less-developed countries; the rise of new economic powers in the Global South; and global economic governance.

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  • Module content:

    Security and strategic studies
    A study of traditional and contemporary approaches to security and strategy. Attention is paid to new theories on war, security and strategy; military and non-military security issues and threats; the national security of developing states; as well as the relationship between policy, strategy and tactics. The latter includes an introductory overview of the nature, levels, patterns, forms and instruments of strategy, and the laws of war. The national, regional and continental security situation in Africa and modes of multilateral security cooperation in particular are analysed, also in relation to extra-continental trends. Regarding the aforesaid, emphasis is placed on the legal and institutional framework, national security policy and strategic posture of South Africa.

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  • Module content:

    Latin literature, Roman history and mythology/religion
    Selected passages of prose and poetry; legal and patristic texts may also be included. Latin grammar. Roman history. Greco-Roman mythology and religion.

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  • Module content:

    Latin literature and antiquities
    Selected passages of prose and poetry; legal and patristic texts may also be included. Roman history.
    Selected passages of prose and poetry; legal and patristic texts may also be included. Roman history. Selected topics from Roman antiquities and daily life.

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  • Module content:

    Aspects of the grammar of isiNdebele such as a continuation of the study of the word categories; grammatical analysis; more intensive study of the structure, meaning and use of the noun (specifically derived nouns) and verb (specifically moods and verbal extensions); an introduction to the sound changes/phonology of isiNdebele.

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  • Module content:

    This module in public administration is designed specifically to assist students to have a better understanding regarding the depth, origin and development of ethics in public service and administration. The emphasis here is on building responsive public servants whose duties and responsibilities do not only encourage the effective and efficient functioning of public organisations in an aim to facilitate better service delivery to all, but also apply ethical personal and organisational codes and standards in their daily operational activities. The purpose of this module is to enable the student to apply, synthesise and abstract theory into practice for a better public service of the future.

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  • Module content:

    This module on public administration is designed to broaden the view of students on the understanding of the origin and development of administrative systems. The emphasis is on the practical application of knowledge to problems of developing societies. Increasing global interdependence require scholarly interest in comparative public administration. A motivating force for comparative Public administration is the search for discovering regularities in administrative processes and behaviours throughout the human experience, irrespective of place and time.

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  • Module content:

    The function of myths and rites in current society is investigated. The relation between religion and art is explored. The place and function of music in religion is investigated. The way in which holy texts are interpreted (scriptural reasoning) within different religions is explored.

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  • Module content:

    The following social themes are addressed: Religion and Media; Religion and Ecology; Religion and Xenophobia; Religion and Homophobia; Religion and Violence; Religion and Gender equality; the possibility of Inter-religious dialogue.

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  • Module content:

    Sepedi grammar - Capita selecta
    Aspects of the grammar of Sepedi such as a continuation of the study of the word categories; grammatical analysis; more intensive study of the structure, meaning and use of the noun (specifically derived nouns) and verb (specifically moods and verbal extensions); an introduction to the sound changes / phonology of Sepedi.
    The acquisition and inculcation of advanced communicative skills within a larger number of social, occupational and educational situations. Awareness of the nature and function of language structures is heightened further. Attention is also paid to cultural phenomena.

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  • Module content:

    Structure, agency and power in social theory
    How do we theorise the interrelationships between structure, agency, and power in society? This is the central question in this module, which provides students with an intensive introduction to critical social theories. Engaging with current affairs and debates in society, the module will enable students to learn how to develop theoretical knowledge about the ways in which power is structured and exercised in society – both from above and below, as well as across fields (the economic, the political, the cultural) and scales (the body, private and public spheres, communities and nation-states, and the world-system).

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  • Module content:

    Thinking methodologically
    This module sets out to introduce students to ‘doing research’. In this respect the assumptions and processes underpinning methodological choices in sociological research are considered in order to think about foundations of research, about how knowledge claims are made, how science is conceptualised, what role theory plays, as well as how values and ethics shape the politics of research. In addition to these foundational questions, a broad introduction to methods used in social research is provided by considering both the theoretical dimensions and practical application of various research tools. The purpose of the module is to equip students with the necessary competence to, describe ontological and epistemological debates and different approaches to research in the social sciences, delineate a research problem, identify units of analysis, make sampling decisions and formulate questions and hypothesis as well as understand the principles of quantitative (elementary statistical decision-making) and qualitative data analysis.

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  • Module content:

    isiZulu grammar -  Capita selecta
    Aspects of the grammar of isiZulu such as a continuation of the study of the word categories; grammatical analysis; more intensive study of the structure, meaning and use of the noun (specifically derived nouns) and verb (specifically moods and verbal extensions); an introduction to the sound changes/phonology of isiZulu.  The acquisition and inculcation of advanced communicative skills within a larger number of social, occupational and educational situations. Awareness of the nature and function of language structures is heightened further. Attention is also paid to cultural phenomena.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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