Yearbooks

Programme: MTown and Regional Plan Coursework

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
12252023 Faculty of Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology Duration of study: 2 years Total credits: 240

Programme information

This master’s degree is obtained by virtue of coursework and a mini-dissertation. The topic of the mini-dissertation must be approved by the Head of Department.

Admission requirements

Subject to the stipulations of General Regulations G.30 G.37 and G.38 a relevant four-year degree or a relevant three-year degree plus honours degree or a relevant three-year degree plus a minimum of five years relevant experience, is required for admission to the MT&RP degree programme.

 

Additional requirements

Supplementary undergraduate modules for the MT&RP degree may be prescribed for students who have not obtained a BT&RP degree.

Examinations and pass requirements

A minimum semester/year mark of 40% is required in order to be admitted to the final examination in a specific module. In addition, all other examination admission requirements, applicable to the relevant module, must be met. A minimum pass mark of 40% is required in the examination, with a minimum final mark of 50% to pass.

Pass with distinction

The degree is conferred with distinction on a student who obtains a weighted average of at least 75% in the examinations of all the prescribed core modules as well as the mini-dissertation.

Minimum credits: 120

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Introduction to development and development planning theories; the integrated development planning process; legal, institutional and policy frameworks in which integrated planning functions in South Africa; implementation of integrated development plans; case studies of integrated development planning; simulations of integrated development planning exercises.

    View more

  • Module content:

    Scope, nature and rationale of metropolitan and urban area-based interventions; unique problems in metropolitan areas, for example inner city decay, fringe development, housing, services backlog, the dysfunctional apartheid cityscape and dependency on private transport; types of intervention (inter alia institutional, spatial, economic and social) in order to accomplish restructuring and development in metropolitan areas in South Africa in a relevant, social and environmentally accountable way; policy and legislation regarding urban restructuring and development in South Africa; international and local case studies; impact of globalisation on South African metropolitan areas and major cities; simulated metropolitan and urban area-based intervention exercise.

    View more

  • Module content:

    Scope, nature and rationale of regional interventions on both a supra-national and subnational scale; approaches to planning and development on continental, macro-regional, provincial and district scales; types of intervention (inter alia institutional, spatial, economic and social) in order to accomplish restructuring and development in regions in a relevant, social and environmentally accountable way, past and present examples of planning on each of these scales; planners’ roles in planning exercises at these scales; critiques and improvements on current practice; rural urban linkages and their significance for regional interventions; debates around the way in which problems facing rural settlements (such as the absence of an economic base and necessary infrastructure, lack of access to land and conflicting demands on natural resources) in regions can be addressed; international and local case studies; simulated regional intervention exercise.

    View more

  • Module content:

    Normative principles for sustainable settlement planning and design; design theory; planning and design processes; simulated urban and rural settlement planning and design exercise.

    View more

  • Module content:

    Theory of urban design and its relation to town and regional planning; urban design principles for well-performing settlements; urban design process; urban design frameworks and precinct plans; simulated urban design exercise at neighbourhood level.

    View more

Minimum credits: 120

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Defining research; research paradigms; research ethics; research problems/questions; literature reviews; research design; selected qualitative and quantitative methods for data collection, analysis and interpretation; reporting research; formulation of a research proposal.

    View more

  • Module content:

    A brief history of land use management in South Africa; rationale for land use management; principles of good land use management in the context of transformation and development imperatives in post-apartheid South Africa, global environmental change, new economic geography, procedural, substantive and intergenerational justice and development economics; critique of land use management; ethics of land use management; the characteristics of an appropriate land use management system that advances transformation, sustainability, resilience, equity, inclusiveness and integration in South Africa; the link between land use management and strategic spatial planning; international and South African examples of land use management systems; the future of land use management. Generic components of land use and land development applications and procedures; practical exercises in the preparation, submission, processing and evaluation of land use management applications; policy preparation in terms of land use management systems that advance the principles of effective, efficient and sustainable land use management; appeals; introduction to Environmental Impact Studies (EIAs).

    View more

  • Module content:

    Contextualisation of a research problem/question; literature review; research design and methods; undertake empirical research in line with an approved research proposal; collection, analysis and interpretation of data; writing up of research findings.

    View more

  • Module content:

    Overview of South African institutional and legal structures for planning and development, on national and provincial scale. Relevant legislation and policies that influence planning. Specific reference to the legal frameworks guiding land development, the environment, municipal management and development, housing, transport, water, and Human Rights.

    View more


The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

Copyright © University of Pretoria 2019. All rights reserved.

FAQ's Email Us Virtual Campus Share