Yearbooks

Programme: BDietetics

Code Faculty Department
10139003 Faculty of Health Sciences Department: Human Nutrition
Credits Duration NQF level SAQA ID
Minimum duration of study: 4 years Total credits: 548 NQF level:  08 SAQA ID:  7061

Programme information

The programme extends over four academic years during which period a student receives practical training as a student dietician at an institution or institutions approved for this purpose by the University.

After admission to the first year of study, each student in Dietetics must register as a student in Dietetics with the Health Professions Council of South Africa.

Students are required to complete at least four weeks applicable elective training (Code DTT 380) under the supervision of a dietician at an institution approved for this purpose by the University, after the first semester of the third year of study and prior to the commencement of the fourth year of study.

Note: Students who enrolled for the BDietetics degree programme prior to 2105 will complete the degree under the old curriculum. However, students who will have third-year status in 2020 will be transferred to the new curriculum.

Admission requirements

Important information for all prospective students for 2022

  • The admission requirements apply to students who apply for admission to the University of Pretoria with a National Senior Certificate (NSC) and Independent Examination Board (IEB) qualifications.
  • Applicants with qualifications other than the abovementioned should refer to:
    • Brochure: Undergraduate Programme Information 2022: Qualifications other than the NSC and IEB, available at click here.
  • Citizens from countries other than South Africa (applicants who are not South African citizens) should also refer to:
  • School of Tomorrow (SOT), Accelerated Christian Education (ACE) and General Education Development Test (GED): The University of Pretoria no longer accepts qualifications awarded by these institutions.
  • National Certificate (Vocational) (NCV) Level 4: The University of Pretoria may consider NCV candidates, provided they meet the exemption for bachelor’s status criteria and the programme requirements.

Transferring students

A transferring student is a student who, at the time of application for a degree programme at the University of Pretoria (UP) –

  • is a registered student at another tertiary institution, or was previously registered at another tertiary institution and did not complete the programme enrolled for at that institution, and is not currently enrolled at a tertiary institution, or has completed studies at another tertiary institution, but is not currently enrolled at a tertiary institution, or has started with tertiary studies at UP, then moved to another tertiary institution and wants to be readmitted at UP.

A transferring student will be considered for admission based on

  • an NSC or equivalent qualification with exemption to bachelor’s or diploma studies (whichever is applicable); and meeting the minimum faculty-specific subject requirements at NSC or tertiary level; or having completed a higher certificate at a tertiary institution with faculty-specific subjects/modules passed (equal to or more than 50%), as well as complying with faculty rules on admission;
  • previous academic performance (must have passed all modules registered for up to the closing date of application ) or as per faculty regulation/promotion requirements;
  • a certificate of good conduct.

Note: Students who have been dismissed at the previous institution due to poor academic performance, will not be considered for admission to UP.

Returning students

A returning student is a student who, at the time of application for a degree programme –

  • is a registered student at UP, and wants to transfer to another degree at UP, or was previously registered at UP and did not complete the programme enrolled for, and did not enrol at another tertiary institution in the meantime (including students who applied for leave of absence), or has completed studies at UP, but is not currently enrolled or was not enrolled at another tertiary institution after graduation.

A returning student will be considered for admission based on

  • an NSC or equivalent qualification with exemption to bachelor’s or diploma studies (whichever is applicable); and meeting the minimum faculty-specific subject requirements at NSC or tertiary level; or previous academic performance (should have a cumulative weighted average of at least 50% for the programme enrolled for);
  • having applied for and was granted leave of absence.

Note: Students who have been excluded/dismissed from a faculty due to poor academic performance may be considered for admission to another programme at UP.  The Admissions Committee may consider such students if they were not dismissed more than twice. Only ONE transfer between UP faculties will be allowed, and a maximum of two (2) transfers within a faculty.

Important faculty-specific information on undergraduate programmes for 2022

  • The following persons will be considered for admission: a candidate who is in possession of a certificate that is deemed by the University to be equivalent to the required National Senior Certificate (NSC) with university endorsement; a candidate who is a graduate from another tertiary institution or has been granted the status of a graduate of such an institution; a candidate who is a graduate of another Faculty at the University of Pretoria; and a candidate who is currently studying at a university.
  • Admission to Health Sciences programmes is subject to a selection process.
  • Grade 11 final examination results will be used for the conditional selection of prospective students.
  • For selection purposes, the sum of the results in six subjects, including English, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, is calculated.
  • Life Orientation is excluded in the calculation of the Admission Point Score (APS).
  • All modules will be presented in English, as English is the language of tuition, communication and correspondence.
  • Places are reserved in specific categories to ensure an equitable representation of demographically defined designated groups. Selection thus takes place in different categories.
  • For purposes of selection in the Faculty of Health Sciences, the “Designated Group” category includes South African Black African or South African Coloured African candidates. The “Open” category refers to all applicants including applicants from the Designated Group who compete first in the Open category and then in the Designated Group category if unsuccessful in the Open category.
  • Target numbers are specified for all categories as applicable to each programme. Where insufficient applications are received from qualifying applicants in a certain category, the selection committee may decide not to fill all places or to fill the places from qualifying applicants in another category.
  • A limited number of places are made available to citizens from countries other than South Africa (applicants who are not South African citizens), with those from SADC countries being given preference. Permanent residents of RSA are not categorised as foreign students. Applications from citizens from countries other than South Africa  (applicants who are not South African citizens) may also be considered if they are
    • citizens or permanent residents of countries which have relevant government to government agreements with South Africa
    • asylum seekers or refugees
  • Citizens from countries other than South Africa (applicants who are not South African citizens) who do not comply with the conditions above may be considered if space is available.
  • If an applicant has multiple citizenships, which includes South African citizenship, he/she will be considered as a South African applicant.
  • The final number of places allocated to new applicants will be determined on an annual basis taking into account the teaching facilities and resources available and, where necessary, the number of places allocated to students repeating modules in the first year of study of each degree programme.
  • Only applicants who comply with the requirements set out in this document will be considered for selection. However, the achievement of the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission as only a limited number of students can be accommodated.
  • Selection is based on merit. The faculty does not determine specific selection cut-off values for the different categories. Such values are generated by the competing students within a particular category in relation to the number of places available.
  • A Merit Point Score (MPS) is used for ranking applicants for selection purposes in all programmes. In certain programmes other criteria such as rural residence may be used as part of the selection process.
  • Only first-choice applicants will be considered, except where otherwise specified, in which case second-choice candidates may be considered if there are places available.
  • The top candidates will be selected provisionally up to or surpassing the allocated number, based on experience of the expected number of acceptances. A waiting list is created from the group of candidates with the next highest scores. The length of the waiting list is determined by experience of the number of places likely to become available and to prevent creating unrealistic expectations.
  • All offers are provisional until the final exam results have been received. For applicants in the School leaver categories a provisional place will be confirmed as long as the NSC or equivalent scores do not fall by more than two points from the Grade 11 APS score.
  • After the final NSC or equivalent qualification results are received, provisional offers will be confirmed if the applicant still meets the required criteria. The MPS of those on the waiting list will be recalculated using the NSC or equivalent qualification results and if places become available they will be made offers.
  • Places becoming available in any category after selection due to cancellation or forfeiture will be filled from the waiting list for the specific category.
  • This waiting list will remain active until the end of the second week after the start of lectures.
  • All successful candidates are admitted to the first year of study only. Registered students in the University Experienced categories may apply for credit for equivalent modules which they have completed.
  • Incomplete applications will not be considered and any false information provided by an applicant in his/her application may result in immediate cancellation of the application, admission or registration.
  • Candidates should note that their conditional admission will be revoked if their APS drops by more than two points in their final school examination results.
  • PLEASE NOTE that compliance with the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee admission to any programme in this Faculty.
  • Selection queries may be directed to click here.
  • A student who is made an offer but does not accept it cannot defer the offer and must reapply to be considered in the following year.

University of Pretoria website click here  

Minimum requirements

Achievement level

English Home Language or English First Additional Language

Mathematics

 

Physical Sciences

APS

NSC/IEB

NSC/IEB

NSC/IEB

4

5

5

28

 

Additional requirements

Also consult General Academic Regulations.

Other programme-specific information

Exemption from the examination in (FAR) Pharmacology 381, 382
Exemption from the examination can be granted if a student who obtained a module mark of at least 65%, exercises the option to accept it as the final mark.

Examinations and pass requirements

  1. Each paper (Paper 1 and 2) of the written examination for Medical nutrition therapy 323, 411 and 480 (MNX 323, 411, 480) as well as the practical examination for MNX 411 must be passed individually with a subminimum of 40%.
  2. Each paper written for the supplementary examination opportunity in Medical nutrition therapy 323, 411 and 480 (MNX 323, 411, 480) as well as the practical examination for MNX 411 (supplementary examination opportunity) must be passed individually with a subminimum of 50%.
  • In accordance with the stipulations of the General Academic Regulations a year, semester or quarter mark of at least 40% is required for admission to the examination in all undergraduate modules in the University where year, semester and quarter marks apply.
  • The final mark for a specific module in Nursing Science, Physiotherapy, Radiography, Occupational Therapy and Human Nutrition (at least 50% is required to pass) is calculated from the examination mark as well as the mark compiled from the evaluation of a student during continuous, objective and controlled assessment opportunities during the course of the quarter/semester/year. At least one formal assessment per module is set as the minimum norm, and students will be exposed on a continuous and regular basis to self-directed assignments in order to promote reflective learning.
  • In the case of modules with practical components, students are required to also comply with the applicable attendance requirements with regard to acquiring practical skills before a pass mark can be obtained for the module.
  • There are two main examination periods per annum. In respect of first-semester modules, the standard examination is in May/June and the supplementary examination is in July. In respect of second-semester modules, the standard examination is in October/ November and the supplementary examination is in November/December of the same year. Where students need to work additional clinical hours to be allowed to do a supplementary examination, the relevant head of department will determine the date of the supplementary examination.
  • Only two examination opportunities per module are allowed. If a student fails the supplementary examination, the module must be repeated.
  • A supplementary examination in a module is granted to students in the following cases:
  • If a student obtains a final mark of between 40%-49% in the relevant module at the standard examination and thus fails.
  • If a student obtains a final mark of at least 50% but the required subminimum in the examination, as required for a specific module, has not been obtained.
  • Students intending to sit the supplementary examination due to the reasons mentioned above, must register for the supplementary examination 24 hours after the results have been made public.
  • If a student fails a module at the standard examination, the examination mark obtained in the relevant module at the supplementary examination will be calculated as the final mark. The marks obtained with continuous evaluation during the course of the quarter/semester/year will not be taken into calculation. If the student passes the module at the supplementary examination opportunity, a maximum of 50% is awarded as a pass mark to the module in question.
  • A student who is prevented from writing the standard examination due to illness or other qualifying circumstances, may be granted permission by the dean to write a special examination in the particular module(s).
  • If a student is granted permission from the Dean to write a special examination, the continuous evaluation mark, together with the examination mark obtained in the module in question at the supplementary examination opportunity, will be calculated as the final mark obtained in the module.
  • In instances where students are unable to write the examination and supplementary examination as a consequence of a serious medical condition or an accident, such a student must apply for a special dispensation, with the support of the dean, to the Registrar, who will make a final decision.
  • The School of Healthcare Sciences applies the General Academic Regulations, according to which a student requiring a limited number of modules (no more than the equivalent of four semester modules) to complete his or her degree, may in terms of faculty regulations, be admitted to a Chancellor's examination in the modules in question.

Promotion to next study year

  • A student must pass in all the prescribed core modules of a specific year of study to be promoted to a subsequent year of study. A student can only be promoted to a subsequent year of study if the student has not failed more than two fundamental modules of seven weeks each per semester or one module of 14 weeks per semester. A non-negotiable prerequisite for admission to the final year of study is pass marks in all the core and fundamental modules of the preceding years of study. Refer to the programmes for fundamental modules in each discipline.
  • A pass mark refers to a final mark of at least 50%.
  • Modules with practical and clinical training credits cannot be passed unless all the prescribed clinical hours and practical activities have been completed to the satisfaction of the relevant head of department.
  • The Chairperson of the examination moderating meeting may, after assessing the student’s total profile, grant special approval to be promoted to the next year of study.
  • The exception is the Department of Human Nutrition, where the regulations as applicable in the Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences regarding the modules presented by that Faculty, are relevant.
  • Modules can only be taken in advance or repeated if it can be accommodated in the existing examination timetable.
  • A student who must repeat a year of study may, with the approval of the Chairperson of the examination moderating meeting and the relevant head of department, be allowed to take fundamental modules of the subsequent year, if he/she complies with all the prerequisites for the relevant modules. No adjustment to existing timetables will be allowed.

The following fundamental modules are relevant:

?   BCM 251, 252, 257, FAR 381, VDS 322; VDB 321

Practical/clinical/internship information

Internship training (second semester of the final year of study)
The four compulsory semester modules (CNT 480, DTT 480, MNX 480 and FSS 480) jointly form the internship training and must be taken simultaneously.

Pass with distinction

The degree is conferred with distinction on a student who has obtained at least 75% (not rounded) in the following modules: CNT 411, 480 jointly, as well as MNX 411, 480 jointly (not rounded), and FSS 480.

Minimum credits: 100

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    Find, evaluate, process, manage and present information resources for academic purposes using appropriate technology.

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  • Module content:

    Apply effective search strategies in different technological environments. Demonstrate the ethical and fair use of information resources. Integrate 21st-century communications into the management of academic information.

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  • Module content:

    General introduction to inorganic, analytical and physical chemistry. Atomic structure and periodicity. Molecular structure and chemical bonding using the VSEOR model. Nomenclature of inorganic ions and compounds. Classification of reactions: precipitation, acid-base, redox reactions and gas-forming reactions. Mole concept and stoichiometric calculations concerning chemical formulas and chemical reactions. Principles of reactivity: energy and chemical reactions. Physical behaviour gases, liquids, solids and solutions and the role of intermolecular forces. Rate of reactions: Introduction to chemical kinetics.

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  • Module content:

    Theory: General physical-analytical chemistry: Chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, buffers, solubility equilibrium, entropy and free energy, electrochemistry. Organic chemistry: Structure (bonding), nomenclature, isomerism, introductory stereochemistry, introduction to chemical reactions and chemical properties of organic compounds and biological compounds, i.e. carbohydrates and aminoacids. Practical: Molecular structure (model building), synthesis and properties of simple organic compounds.

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  • Module content:

    Academic reading as well as academic writing and presentation skills, based on the approach followed in the healthcare sciences. *Presented to students in Health Sciences only.

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  • Module content:

    Study of specific language skills required in the Health Care Sciences, including interviewing and report-writing skills. *Presented to students in Health Sciences only.   (BCur, BDietetics, BOH, BOT, Brad, BPhysT)*

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  • Module content:

     Introduction to the molecular structure and function of the cell. Basic chemistry of the cell. Structure and composition of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Ultrastructure and function of cellular organelles, membranes and the cytoskeleton. General principles of energy, enzymes and cell metabolism. Selected processes, e.g. glycolysis, respiration and/or photosynthesis. Introduction to molecular genetics: DNA structure and replication, transcription, translation. Cell growth and cell division.

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Core modules

Minimum credits: 132

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    Structural and ionic properties of amino acids. Peptides, the peptide bond, primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins. Interactions that stabilise protein structure, denaturation and renaturation of proteins. Introduction to methods for the purification of proteins, amino acid composition, and sequence determinations. Enzyme kinetics and enzyme inhibition. Allosteric enzymes, regulation of enzyme activity, active centres and mechanisms of enzyme catalysis. Examples of industrial applications of enzymes and in clinical pathology as biomarkers of diseases. Online activities include introduction to practical laboratory techniques and Good Laboratory Practice; techniques for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of biological molecules; enzyme activity measurements; processing and presentation of scientific data.

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  • Module content:

    Carbohydrate structure and function. Blood glucose measurement in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes. Bioenergetics and biochemical reaction types. Glycolysis,  gluconeogenesis, glycogen metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway, citric acid cycle and electron transport. Total ATP yield from the complete oxidation of glucose. A comparison of cellular respiration and photosynthesis. Online activities include techniques for the study and analysis of metabolic pathways and enzymes; PO ratio of mitochondria, electrophoresis, extraction, solubility and gel permeation techniques; scientific method and design. 

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  • Module content:

    Chemical foundations. Weak interactions in aqueous systems. Ionisation of water, weak acids and weak bases. Buffering against pH changes in biological systems. Water as a reactant and function of water. Carbohydrate structure and function. Biochemistry of lipids and membrane structure. Nucleotides and nucleic acids. Other functions of nucleotides: energy carriers, components of enzyme cofactors and chemical messengers. Introduction to metabolism. Bioenergetics and biochemical reaction types. Online activities include introduction to laboratory safety and Good Laboratory Practice; basic biochemical calculations; experimental method design and scientific controls, processing and presentation of scientific data.

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  • Module content:

    Structure, gas exchange and secretory functions of the lungs; structure, excretory and non-urinary functions of the kidneys, acid-base balance, and skin and body temperature control. Practical work to complement the theory.

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  • Module content:

    Nutrition, digestion and metabolism, hormonal control of body functions, and the reproductive systems. Practical work to complement the theory.

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Core modules

Minimum credits: 195

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    The undergraduate pharmacology module introduces students to general pharmacological principles, routes of administration, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Furthermore, disease treatment with relation to disorders of the cardiovascular, inflammatory and autonomic nervous system is discussed, as well as anaesthesia, asthma, diabetes, diuresis, obesity and pain.

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    Community nutrition practice within the larger public health realm. Nutrition within primary healthcare. Nutrition and community development as well as project planning and management.

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  • Module content:

    Theory of counselling. Interviewing: Interview; the consultation process; verbal, written and non-verbal communication to clients, patients, employees as individuals or groups in different stages of the life cycle in health and disease in homogenic and trans/multi-cultural situations by means of applicable theoretical frameworks.

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  • Module content:

    Practice training: Management of a dietetics clinic. Practising the consultation process and practice management in a dietetics clinic.

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  • Module content:

    Community needs assessment. Leadership in community development. Planning and implementation of collaborative community-based interventions. Application of principles of monitoring and evaluation. NB: Only for School of Healthcare Sciences and Department of Speech - Language Pathology and Audiology students.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to the origin of diseases as a consequence of programmed changes that occur during impaired intrauterine growth and development. Aetiology and clinical manifestations of under-nutrition/PEM; principles and practices of medical nutrition therapy in under-nutrition/PEM; impact and influence of worm infestation. Congenital heart disease and special problems related to children with congenital heart disease. Relationship between malnutrition and Aids; role of nutrition in immunity within the context of HIV/Aids; clinical signs, symptoms and problems associated with Aids and guidelines for the alleviation of these symptoms; nutritional related problems of medication used by Aids patients. Appropriate practical assignments and case studies.

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  • Module content:

    Relationships between obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance and concomitant health risks. Aetiology, pathophysiology and manifestation(s) of type 1 and type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance; principles and practices of medical nutrition therapy of diabetes mellitus integrated with medical/pharmacological treatment; dietary treatment/prevention of complications; dietary adaptations when exercising and life style/behaviour modification. Aetiology and clinical manifestations of cardiovascular; principles and practices of medical nutrition therapy in CVD. Aetiology and clinical manifestation(s) of renal disease conditions; principles and practices of medical nutrition therapy in renal conditions (nephritic syndrome, nephrotic syndrome, acute and chronic renal failure, nephrolithiasis). Nutrient-drug interactions. Metabolic response to acute and chronic stress. Principles of special nutritional care, special feeding methods and products required for injured/critically ill patients. Appropriate practical assignments and case studies

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  • Module content:

    Evaluation of nutritional status.

    Nutrition care process, overview of evaluation of nutrition status. Scientific principles of evaluation of nutrition status; nutrition screening; clinical, anthropometric, biochemical and dietary evaluation of nutrition status. Practice training: practising of theoretical principles of nutrition status evaluation in hospital/clinic and/or skills laboratory.

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  • Module content:

    Concepts of research; research process; research studies appraisal; planning and developing literature review; developing research idea and research question; research principles in designing research proposal; research proposal writing.

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  • Module content:

    Planning and layout of food service units for different food service systems. Equipment for food services. Factors influencing the choice and purchasing of equipment for different food service units. Hygiene and safety in food services. management in food service systems. Financial management in food services.

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  • Module content:

    Large-scale production.

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Minimum credits: 121

Core modules


The regulations and rules for the degrees published here are subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information.

The General Academic Regulations (G Regulations) and General Student Rules apply to all faculties and registered students of the University, as well as all prospective students who have accepted an offer of a place at the University of Pretoria. On registering for a programme, the student bears the responsibility of ensuring that they familiarise themselves with the General Academic Regulations applicable to their registration, as well as the relevant faculty-specific and programme-specific regulations and information as stipulated in the relevant yearbook. Ignorance concerning these regulations will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression, or basis for an exception to any of the aforementioned regulations.

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