Yearbooks

Programme: BSocSciHons Industrial Sociology and Labour Studies

Code Faculty
01243022 Faculty of Humanities
Credits Duration NQF level
Minimum duration of study: 1 year Total credits: 125 NQF level:  08
Contact:
Dr RJ Chadwick
[email protected]
+27 (0)124203111

Admission requirements

  • A relevant bachelor’s degree with Sociology Industrial Sociology or a directly related social science major is needed for admission.
  • An average of at least 70% is required in the major/field of specialisation.
  • In certain cases, additional modules will be required.
  • Students with an average of between 68% and 70% in the major/field of specialisation could be considered for admission on academic merit until the programme is full. Apply to the Head of Department.

Additional requirements

  • In certain cases additional modules will be required.
  • Students with an average of between 68% and 70% in the major/field of specialisation could be considered for admission under special conditions. Apply to the programme manager.

Other programme-specific information

  • Choose one elective module.
  • Not all modules are offered in any given year. Please consult the programme manager in this regard.

Minimum credits: 125

Elective module

Select ONE module.

Core modules

  • Module content:

    This module explores the changing nature of organisational forms that dominated certain historical periods in economic history. Concepts such as bureaucracy, Fordism and post-Fordism within the context of changing organisational forms are examined, The module will also examine organisational cultures particularly within the context of debates around employment equity.

    View more

  • Module content:

    The module focuses on debates about, as well as the practice of, research. The idea of science, the role of theoretical conceptualisations, and the epistemological assumptions underpinning research are introduced with reference to competing paradigms, including positivism, interpretivism and realism. With regard to research practice, general principles of planning such as identifying a topic, delineating a problem area, selecting sites, sampling participants and addressing ethical questions are considered. Thereafter the use of methods through which data can be collected and/or constructed are introduced and ways in which evidence can be interpreted and analysed are discussed.

    View more

  • Module content:

    In this module students are expected to produce a research paper under weekly supervision. In the first instance, the paper ought to demonstrate a student’s ability to conduct empirical research. However, with the necessary permission a student may also base the paper on the analysis of secondary data or draw on archival and/or documentary sources. The research paper needs to demonstrate students’ understanding of and competence in all aspects of the research process, including making an argument, writing a report, analysing data, integrating research findings with the literature, and research ethics. Students who are registered for the BSocSciHons (Gender Studies) or BSocSciHons (Industrial Sociology and Labour Studies) need to ensure that the topic of their research paper aligns to the degree focus. 

    View more

  • Module content:

    This module introduces students to key conceptual vocabularies, as well as selected theoretical paradigms and scholarly works in order to facilitate an understanding of some of the current debates, innovations and controversies in the field. A balance is struck between classic and contemporary social theory, and an emphasis is placed on questions of textuality, canonicity and interdisciplinarity in shaping conversations about social theory and its significance for research, thought and politics. 

    View more

Elective modules

  • Module content:

    This module explores the relationship between work and employment relations with particular reference to South Africa and the global south. It includes a focus on the relationships between employers and employees, labour, organisations and the state. It also demonstrates how these relationships are embedded in the type of work and the changing workplace.

    View more

  • Module content:

    This module examines theoretical explanations of globalisation. In doing so its primary goal is to explore ways in which capital in the era of the end of history is compelling us to rethink sociology as a science of the present. The module begins with theoretical discussions in order to lay the ground for talk about development as a process of incorporating (in this case) Africa into the global world system. The module further studies changes brought about by globalisation to the nation-state system, work and gender relations. It also examines nationalism and ethnicity as specific features of capitalism in the era of the end of history.

    View more

  • Module content:

    This course takes a macro-level perspective and introduces students to scholarly accounts of the changing historical trajectory of gender relations, marriage as an institution, family forms, and household composition and livelihoods and the implications thereof for understanding gender as a social relation. As such, it adopts a historical and comparative perspective, with a specific focus on Southern Africa. In addition, the module explores the role and impact of supra-state organisations, the state and the market in mediating and regulating gender identities and relations, as well as family and household forms, against the backdrop of the nation-state form and in the context of capitalism and neo-liberalism particularly. 

    View more

  • Module content:

    This module takes a sociological approach to understanding and interrogating South African society. It begins by looking at some of the debates and discussions about Sociology in South Africa. It then reviews and debates key issues in order to understand the political economy of Apartheid. Finally it looks at some key debates associated with post-apartheid South Africa. 

    View more


The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

Copyright © University of Pretoria 2021. All rights reserved.

FAQ's Email Us Virtual Campus Share Cookie Preferences