Yearbooks

Programme: BSc Information and Knowledge Systems

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
12133213 Faculty of Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology Minimum duration of study: 3 years Total credits: 446

Admission requirements

  • The following persons will be considered for admission: a candidate who is in possession of a certificate that is deemed by the University to be equivalent to the required Grade 12 certificate with university endorsement; a candidate who is a graduate from another tertiary institution or has been granted the status of a graduate of such an institution; and a candidate who is a graduate of another faculty at the University of Pretoria.

  • Life Orientation is excluded when calculating the APS.

  • Grade 11 results are used in the conditional admission of prospective students.

  • A valid qualification with admission to degree studies is required.

  • Minimum subject and achievement requirements, as set out below, are required. 

  • Should a candidate obtain an APS of 26 to 29, consideration for admission will be based on the results of the NBT, provided the quotas regarding student numbers have not been reached.

  • Tuition will be presented in English only.

Minimum requirements

Achievement level

English Home Language or English First Additional Language

Mathematics

APS

NSC/IEB

AS Level

NSC/IEB

AS Level

4

D

5

C

30

(26 - 29 admission based on the NBT)

* Cambridge A level candidates who obtained at least a D in the required subjects, will be considered for admission. International Baccalaureate (IB) HL candidates who obtained at least a 4 in the required subjects, will be considered for admission.

Promotion to next study year

General

  1. A student must pass all the modules of the first year of study, before he or she is permitted to register for any module of the third year of study. Module prerequisites remain applicable. Exceptions to this rule will be considered by the relevant head of department and the Dean.
  2. A student must pass all the modules of the second year of study, before he or she is permitted to register for any module of the fourth year of study (in the case of a four-year degree). Module prerequisites remain applicable. Exceptions to this rule will be considered by the relevant head of department and the Dean.
  3. A new first-year student, who has failed in all the prescribed modules of the programme at the end of the first semester, will not be permitted to proceed  to the second semester in the School of Information Technology.
  4. A student who has not passed at least 70% of the credits of the current year of study after the November examinations will not be re-admitted to the School of Information Technology.
  5. Students who fail a module for a second time, forfeit the privilege of registering for any modules of an advanced year of study.
  6. Students whose academic progress is not acceptable can be suspended from further studies.

Procedure: Exclusion from and re-admission to further studies in the School of Information Technology

  1. A student who is excluded from further studies in terms of the stipulations of the abovementioned regulations will be notified in writing by the Dean or admissions committee of the School of Information Technology at the end of the relevant semester.
  2. A student who has been excluded from further studies may apply in writing to the admissions committee of the School of Information Technology on level 6 in the Engineering building I for re-admission.
  3. Written applications for re-admission to the second semester must be submitted at least 7 days before lectures resume for the second semester.
  4. Written applications for re-admission to the new academic year must be submitted before 12 January.
  5. Late applications will be accepted only in exceptional circumstances after approval by the Dean.
  6. Should a student not be re-admitted to further studies by the admissions committee of the School of Information Technology, he/she will be informed in writing.
  7. A student who is not re-admitted by the admissions committee of the School of Information Technology has the right to appeal to the Appeals Committee: Admissions in the Administration building, room 3-13.
  8. Any decision taken by the Appeals Committee: Admissions is final.
  9. Should the student be re-admitted by the Admissions Committee, strict conditions will be set which the student must comply with in order to proceed with his/her studies.
  10. A student, who is repeating his or her year, may be permitted by the Dean, on recommendation of the relevant head(s) of department, to register for modules of the following year of study in addition to the outstanding modules he or she has failed, providing that he or she complies with the prerequisites of these modules and no timetable clashes occur. In no semester may the total credits for which a student registers, exceed the normal number of credits per semester by more than 16 credits, except with special permission from the relevant head of department.

Pass with distinction

A degree (undergraduate) in the School of IT is conferred with distinction on a student who did not repeat any module of his/her final year, obtained a weighted average of at least 75% in all the prescribed modules for the final year, provided that a subminimum of 65% is obtained in each of these modules and provided that the degree is completed in the prescribed minimum period of time. Ad hoc cases will be considered by the Dean, in consultation with the relevant head of department.

Minimum credits: 140

Students are required to choose their electives from what is referred to as an elective group.  Once an elective group has been chosen, the modules listed per year level need to be completed in order to comply with the requirements of the degree programme.  These elective groups, along with their respective first year modules are:

  • Data Science (WTW 146, WTW 148, WTW 152, STK 110 and STK 120)
  • Genetics (BME 120, BOT 161, GTS 161, MBY 161, MLB 111 and WTW 146)
  • Geographical Information Systems (GGY 156, ENV 101, GGY 166, GMC 110, STK 110 and WTW 146)
  • IT and Enterprises (BEM 120, OBS 114, OBS 124 and STK 110)
  • IT and Law (KRG 110, KRG 120, KRM 110 and KRM 120)
  • IT and Music (MGS 110, MGS 120, MPE 170, MCS 200, WTW 146 and WTW 148)
  • Software Development (INF 154, INF 164 and INF 171)

Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    The focus is on object-oriented (OO) programming. Concepts including inheritance and multiple inheritance, polymorphism, operator overloading, memory management (static and dynamic binding), interfaces, encapsulation, reuse, etc. will be covered in the module. The module teaches sound program design with the emphasis on modular code, leading to well structured, robust and documented programs. A modern OO programming language is used as the vehicle to develop these skills. The module will introduce the student to basic data structures, lists, stacks and queues.

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  • Module content:

    Fundamental concepts of modern operating systems in terms of their structure and the mechanisms they use are studied in this module. After completing this module, students will have gained, as outcomes, knowledge of real time, multimedia and multiple processor systems, as these will be defined and analysed. In addition, students will have gained knowledge on modern design issues of process management, deadlock and concurrency control, memory management, input/output management, file systems and operating system security. In order to experience a hands-on approach to the knowledge students would have gained from studying the abovementioned concepts, students will have produced a number of practical implementations of these concepts using the Windows and Linux operating systems.

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  • Module content:

    This module introduces imperative computer programming, which is a fundamental building block of computer science. The process of constructing a program for solving a given problem, of editing it, compiling (both manually and automatically), running and debugging it, is covered from the beginning. The aim is to master the elements of a programming language and be able to put them together in order to construct programs using types, control structures, arrays, functions and libraries. An introduction to object orientation will be given. After completing this module, the student should understand the fundamental elements of a program, the importance of good program design and user-friendly interfaces. Students should be able to conduct basic program analysis and write complete elementary programs.

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  • Module content:

    This module introduces concepts and terminology related to the computer science discipline. General topics covered include the history of computing, machine level representation of data, Boolean logic and gates, basic computer systems organisation, algorithms and complexity and automata theory. The module also introduces some of the subdisciplines of computer science, such as computer networks, database systems, compilers, information security and intelligent systems. The module also focues on modelling of algorithms.

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  • Module content:

    Propositional logic: truth tables, logical equivalence, implication, arguments. Mathematical induction and well-ordering principle. Introduction to set theory. Counting techniques: elementary probability, multiplication and addition rules, permutations and combinations, binomial theorem, inclusion-exclusion rule.

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  • Module content:

    *Students will not be credited for more than one of the following modules for their degree: WTW 134, WTW 165, WTW 114, WTW 158. WTW 134 does not lead to admission to Mathematics at 200 level and is intended for students who require Mathematics at 100 level only. WTW 134 is offered as WTW 165 in the second semester only to students who have applied in the first semester of the current year for the approximately 65 MBChB, or the 5-6 BChD places becoming available in the second semester and who were therefore enrolled for MGW 112 in the first semester of the current year. 
    Functions, derivatives, interpretation of the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of differentiation, integration, interpretation of the definite integral, applications of integration. Matrices, solutions of systems of equations. All topics are studied in the context of applications.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    This module provides an overview of the fundamentals of marketing by considering the exchange process, customer value, marketing research and the development of a marketing plan. It also addresses the marketing mix elements with specific focus on the seven service marketing elements namely the service product, physical evidence, people, process, distribution, pricing and integrated marketing communication.

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  • Module content:

    Simple statistical analysis: Data collection and analysis: Samples, tabulation, graphical representation, describing location, spread and skewness. Introductory probability and distribution theory. Sampling distributions and the central limit theorem. Statistical inference: Basic principles, estimation and testing in the one- and two-sample cases (parametric and non-parametric). Introduction to experimental design. One- and twoway designs, randomised blocks. Multiple statistical analysis: Bivariate data sets: Curve fitting (linear and non-linear), growth curves. Statistical inference in the simple regression case. Categorical analysis: Testing goodness of fit and contingency tables. Multiple regression and correlation: Fitting and testing of models. Residual analysis. Computer literacy: Use of computer packages in data analysis and report writing.

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  • Module content:

    Basic plant structure and function; introductory plant taxonomy and plant systematics; principles of plant molecular biology and biotechnology; adaptation of plants to stress; medicinal compounds from plants; basic principles of plant ecology and their application in natural resource management.

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  • Module content:

    Introducing the basic concepts and interrelationships required to understand the complexity of natural environmental problems, physical and human environment, human induced environmental problems, the ways in which the natural environment affects human society and biodiversity, an introduction to major environmental issues in Southern Africa and sustainable development in the context of environmental issues.

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  • Module content:

    Budgeting, payroll accounting, taxation – income tax and an introduction to other types of taxes, credit and the new Credit Act, insurance, accounting for inventories (focus on inventory and the accounting entries, not calculations), interpretation of financial statements.

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  • Module content:

    This module begins by fostering an understanding of human geography. Then follows with the political ordering of space; cultural diversity as well as ethnic geography globally and locally; population geography of the world and South Africa: and four economic levels of development. The purpose is to place South Africa in a world setting and to understand the future of the country.

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  • Module content:

    Investigating southern African landscapes and placing them in a theoretical and global context. The geomorphological evolution of southern Africa. Introduction to the concepts of Geomorphology and its relationships with other physical sciences (e.g. meteorology, climatology, geology, hydrology and biology). The processes and controls of landform and landscape evolution. Tutorial exercises cover basic techniques of geomorphological analysis, and topical issues in Geomorphology.

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  • Module content:

    History, present and future of cartography. Introductory geodesy: shape of the earth, graticule and grids, datum definition, elementary map projection theory, spherical calculations. Representation of geographical data on maps: Cartographic design, cartographic abstraction, levels of measurement and visual variables. Semiotics for cartography: signs, sign systems, map semantics and syntactics, explicit and implicit meaning of maps (map pragmatics).

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  • Module content:

    Chromosomes and cell division. Principles of Mendelian inheritance: locus and alleles, dominance interactions, extensions and modifications of basic principles.. Probability studies. Sex determination and sex linked traits. Pedigree analysis. Genetic linkage and chromosome mapping. Chromosome variation.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to programming.

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  • Module content:

    Programming.

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  • Module content:

    General systems theory, creative problem solving, soft systems methodology. The systems analyst, systems development building blocks, systems development, systems analysis methods, process modelling.

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  • Module content:

    General introduction.
    General principles of the law of contract: introduction to the law of contract; consensus; contractual capacity; legality and physical possibility of performance; formalities; parties to the contract; conditions and related legal concepts; special terms and the interpretation of contracts; breach of contract and the termination of the contractual relationship.

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  • Module content:

    Law of purchase and sale; law of lease; credit agreements; law of agency; law of security.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Fundamental criminology
    A general introduction to criminology is provided. An overview of factors that contribute to crime, forensic criminology and forensic criminalistics are investigated.
    Part 2: Violent crime
    Various types of violent crimes receive attention in this section.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Penology
    Attention is given to the roleplayers in the criminal justice system, namely the police, judiciary and corrections.
    Part 2: Crime prevention and control
    The nature and extent of crime, theories to explain criminal behaviour and crime prevention and control are investigated.

    The two sections will not necessarily be presented in chronological order.

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  • Module content:

    The module will introduce the student to the field of Microbiology. Basic Microbiological aspects that will be covered include introduction into the diversity of the microbial world (bacteria, archaea, eukaryotic microorganisms and viruses), basic principles of cell structure and function, microbial nutrition and microbial growth and growth control. Applications in Microbiology will be illustrated by specific examples i.e. bioremediation, animal-microbial symbiosis, plant-microbial symbiosis and the use of microorganisms in industrial microbiology. Wastewater treatment, microbial diseases and food will be introduced using specific examples.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection.

    This module is the start of a series of modules that form part of an elective programme aiming to prepare, equip and train the student with music-technology related skills and specialisations. It is designed to provide a thorough introductory audio-related engineering and programming skillset for the candidate. The student enrolled in the elective programme does so with the intention to be trained as an expert in the music-technology field and related disciplines.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    *Requires knowledge of music notation.
    Baroque, Classical and Introduction to Jazz: A historical musicological approach to the development and contexts of Western art music during the Baroque and Classical era, and an introduction to the history of jazz, through in-depth critical listening and reading of representative major composers, musical genres, styles and forms.

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  • Module content:

     Introduction to the molecular structure and function of the cell. Basic chemistry of the cell. Structure and composition of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Ultrastructure and function of cellular organelles, membranes and the cytoskeleton. General principles of energy, enzymes and cell metabolism. Selected processes, e.g. glycolysis, respiration and/or photosynthesis. Introduction to molecular genetics: DNA structure and replication, transcription, translation. Cell growth and cell division.

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  • Module content:

    The entrepreneurial mind-set; managers and managing; values, attitudes, emotions, and culture: the manager as a person; ethics and social responsibility; decision making; leadership and responsible leadership; effective groups and teams; managing organizational structure and culture inclusive of the different functions of a generic organisation and how they interact (marketing; finance; operations; human resources and general management); contextualising Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) in each of the topics.

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  • Module content:

    Value chain management: functional strategies for competitive advantage; human resource management; managing diverse employees in a multicultural environment; motivation and performance; using advanced information technology to increase performance; production and operations management; financial management; corporate entrepreneurship.

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  • Module content:

    Descriptive statistics:
    Sampling and the collection of data; frequency distributions and graphical representations. Descriptive measures of location and dispersion.
    Probability and inference:
    Introductory probability theory and theoretical distributions. Sampling distributions. Estimation theory and hypothesis testing of sampling averages and proportions (one and two-sample cases). Identification, use, evaluation and interpretation of statistical computer packages and statistical techniques.

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  • Module content:

    Multivariate statistics:
    Analysis of variance, categorical data analysis, distribution-free methods, curve fitting, regression and correlation, the analysis of time series and indices.
    Statistical and economic applications of quantitative techniques:
    Systems of linear equations: drafting, matrices, solving and application. Optimisation; linear functions (two and more independent variables), non-linear functions (one and two independent variables). Marginal and total functions. Stochastic and deterministic variables in statistical and economic context: producers' and consumers' surplus, distribution functions, probability distributions, probability density functions. Identification, use, evaluation, interpretation of statistical computer packages and statistical techniques.
    This module is also presented as an anti-semester bilingual module.

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  • Module content:

    Characterisation of a set of measurements: Graphical and numerical methods. Random sampling. Probability theory. Discrete and continuous random variables. Probability distributions. Generating functions and moments.

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  • Module content:

    Sampling distributions and the central limit theorem. Statistical inference: Point and interval estimation. Hypothesis testing with applications in one and two-sample cases. Introductory methods for: Linear regression and correlation, analysis of variance, categorical data analysis and non-parametric statistics.  Identification, use, evaluation and interpretation of statistical computer packages and statistical techniques.

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  • Module content:

    Non-linear equations, numerical integration, initial value problems for differential equations, systems of linear equations. Algorithms for elementary numerical techniques are derived and implemented in computer programmes. Error estimates and convergence results are treated.

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  • Module content:

    *Students will not be credited for more than one of the following modules for their degree:
    WTW 124, WTW 146 and WTW 164. The module WTW 146 is designed for students who require Mathematics at 100 level only and does not lead to admission to Mathematics at 200 level.

    Vector algebra, lines and planes, matrix algebra, solution of systems of equations, determinants. Complex numbers and polynomial equations. All topics are studied in the context of applications.

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  • Module content:

    *Students will not be credited for more than one of the following modules for their degree:
    WTW 124, WTW 148 and WTW 164. The module WTW 148 is designed for students who require Mathematics at 100 level only and does not lead to admission to Mathematics at 200 level.

    Integration techniques. Modelling with differential equations. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, optimisation. Numerical techniques. All topics are studied in the context of applications.

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  • Module content:

    The module serves as an introduction to computer programming as used in science. Modelling of dynamical processes using difference equations; curve fitting and linear programming are studied. Applications are drawn from real-life situations in, among others, finance, economics and ecology.

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Minimum credits: 170

Students must continue with the elective groups they chose in first year.  The modules associated with each of the elective groups are the following:

  • Data Science (STK 210 and STK 220)
  • Genetics (GTS 251, GTS 261, MBY 251 and MBY 261)
  • Geographical Information Systems (GGY 283, GIS 220 and GMS 220)
  • IT and Enterprises (BEM 212, FIL 251, OBS 210 and OBS 220)
  • IT and Law (KRG 200, KRM 210 and KRM 220)
  • IT and Music (MPE 270 and MCS 302)
  • Software Development (INF 272, IMY 210 and IMY 220)

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    This project-orientated module is a form of applied learning which is directed at specific community needs and is integrated into all undergraduate academic programmes offered by the Faculty of Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology. 
    The main objectives with the module are as follows:
    (1) The execution of a community-related project aimed at achieving a beneficial impact on a chosen section of society, preferably but not exclusively, by engagement with a section of society which is different from the student's own background.
    (2) The development of an awareness of personal, social and cultural values, an attitude to be of service, and an understanding of social issues, for the purpose of being a responsible professional.
    (3) The development of important multidisciplinary and life skills, such as communication, interpersonal and leadership skills.
    Assessment in this module will include all or most of the following components: evaluation and approval of the project proposal, assessment of oral and/or written progress reports, peer assessment in the event of team projects, written report-back by those at which the project was aimed at, and final assessment on grounds of the submission of a portfolio and a written report.

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    This module introduces students to a framework for investigating both computability and complexity of problems. Topics include, but are not limited to: finite-state machines, regular expressions and their application in a language such as awk, the Halting problem, context-free grammars, P vs NP problem, NP-complete class, reduction techniques, regular languages, DFAs and NFAs, Lattices, Church-Turing thesis.

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  • Module content:

    Data abstraction is a fundamental concept in the design and implementation of correct and efficient software. In prior modules, students are introduced to the basic data structures of lists, stacks and queues. This module continues with advanced data structures such as trees, hash tables, heaps and graphs, and goes into depth with the algorithms needed to manipulate them efficiently. Classical algorithms for sorting, searching, traversing, packing and game playing are included, with an emphasis on comparative implementations and efficiency. At the end of this module, students will be able to identify and recognise all the classical data structures; implement them in different ways; know how to measure the efficiency of implementations and algorithms; and have further developed their programming skills, especially with recursion and polymorphism.

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  • Module content:

    The module will introduce the concepts of model-driven analysis and design as a mechanism to develop and evaluate complex software systems. Systems will be decomposed into known entities, such as design patterns, classes, relationships, execution loops and process flow, in order to model the semantic aspects of the system in terms of structure and behaviour. An appropriate tool will be used to support the software modelling. The role of the software model in the enterprise will be highlighted. Students who successfully complete this module will be able to concep-tualise and analyse problems and abstract a solution.

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  • Module content:

    This module will introduce the student to netcentric systems by focusing on the development of systems for the web, mobile devices and the cloud.  To lay the foundation on which the rest of the module can follow, traditional web-based programming languages such as HTML5, JavaScript, CSS and Python will be covered differentiating between client-side and server-side computation.  Persistence of web-based data will be included for both client and server-based computation.  These technologies will be extended and applied to mobile platforms where the availability of a connection, location-services and mobile device limitations play a role.  For cloud platforms, aspects relating to task partitioning, security, virtualisation, cloud storage and access to the shared data stores, data synchronisation, partitioning and replication are considered. In order to practically demonstrate that a student has reached these outcomes, students will be required to use, integrate and maintain the necessary software and hardware by completing a number of smaller practical assignments where after integrating all these technologies into a comprehensive and practical programming project is required.

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  • Module content:

    This module will expose students to the evolution of databases systems. They will be able to model data conceptually, in terms of models such as conceptual, relational, object oriented, graph-based and network and the mapping between models, in particular between the conceptual and relational model. Foundational concepts relating to the relational model will be considered, such as: entity and referential integrity, relational algebra and calculus, functional dependency, normals forms, Indexing of database systems and transaction processing will also form an integral part of the curriculum. The physical data representation of the databases system both in memory and within the file system of the operating system will be considered.

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  • Module content:

    Computer science courses mostly deal with sequential programs. This module looks at the fundamentals of concurrency; what it means, how it can be exploited, and what facilities are available to determine program correctness. Concurrent systems are designed, analysed and implemented.

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  • Module content:

    This module provides the foundations on which other modules build by enabling a deeper understanding of how software interacts with hardware. It will teach the design and operation of modern digital computers by studying each of the components that make up a digital computer and the interaction between these components. Specific areas of interest, but not limited to, are: representation of data on the machine-level; organisation of the machine on the assembly level; the architecture and organisation of memory; inter- and intra-component interfacing and communication; data paths and control; and parallelism. Topic-level detail and learning outcomes for each of these areas are given by the first 6 units of ‘Architecture and Organisation’ knowledge area as specified by the ACM/IEEE Computer Science Curriculum 2013.
    The concepts presented in the theory lectures will be reinforced during the practical sessions by requiring design and implementation of the concepts in simulators and assembly language using an open source operating system.

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  • Module content:

    Setting up and solving recurrence relations. Equivalence and partial order relations. Graphs: paths, cycles, trees, isomorphism. Graph algorithms: Kruskal, Prim, Fleury. Finite state automata.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Internal and external influencing factors of consumer behaviour, the consumer's decision process and application fields of consumer behaviour, consumerisms and social responsibility, buying behaviour of consumers in both product and service related industries, consumer psychology and the influence thereof on buying behaviour, psychology of pricing, influencing factors in consumer buying behaviour, the impact of various forms of marketing communication on buying behaviour.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), theoretical concepts and applications of GIS. The focus will be on the GIS process of data input, data analysis, data output and associated technologies. This module provides the foundations for more advanced GIS and Geoinformatics topics.

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  • Module content:

    The nature of geographical data and measurement.Application of statistics in the geographical domain. Probability, probability distributions and densities, expected values and variances, Central Limit theorem. Sampling techniques. Exploratory data analysis, descriptive statistics, statistical estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation analysis and regression analysis.

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  • Module content:

    This module will provide a thorough introduction to the basic scientific principles involved in remote sensing, and some of the applications to studies of the Earth’s surface. This includes examining the basic physics of electromagnetic radiation and the complex interactions of radiation with the surface and atmosphere (i.e. spectral signatures). In addition, basic concepts of photogrammetry will be discussed. The theoretical background laid out in the first half of the module will provide the tools for examining various remote sensing applications using data obtained in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. The applications will include uses of satellite remote sensing data for mapping and monitoring vegetation, soils and minerals, snow and ice, water resources and quality, and urban landscapes. The laboratory section will include hands-on experience with various satellite image data sets.

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  • Module content:

    The chemical nature of DNA. The processes of DNA replication, transcription, RNA processing, translation. Control of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.  Recombinant DNA technology and its applications in gene analysis and manipulation.

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  • Module content:

    Chromosome structure and transposable elements. Mutation and DNA repair. Genomics and proteomics. Organelle genomes. Introduction to genetic analysis of populations: allele and genotypic frequencies, Hardy Weinberg Law, its extensions and implications for different mating systems. Introduction to quantitative and evolutionary genetics.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection.
    Advanced Markup Languages 1. This module investigates XML and its related technologies (such as XSLT, XPath, XSL-FO, DTD, XML Schema, and namespaces) as a vital part of the web development process.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed - requires departmental selection.
    Advanced Markup Languages 2. This module assumes knowledge of dynamic scripts and basic web based technologies such as PHP as well as the use of relational databases like MySQL. The module explores the interplay between scripting languages, databases, and current industry standard web technologies, from both the server-side and client-side perspectives. The module has a focus on developing hands-on practical skills.

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  • Module content:

    Advanced programming.

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  • Module content:

    Company law, law concerning close corporations, law of partnerships, labour law, law of arbitration and transport, law of insurance, law concerning negotiable documents, law of insolvency, law of succession and trusts.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Forensic criminalistics
    The integrated nature of systematic criminal investigation is explored by demarcating the study field into the criminal tactic and technique.
    Part 2: Youth misbehaviour
    The nature, extent, theoretical explanations as well as prevention and control of youth misbehaviour are investigated.

    The two sections will not necessarily be presented in chronological order.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Victimology
    Contemporary issues in victimology are explored and special attention is given to aspects such as victim-based legislation and restorative justice. 
    Part 2: Political offences
    Political offences such as corruption, assassination and human rights violations are investigated in this section.

    The two sections will not necessarily be presented in chronological order.

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  • Module content:

    Growth, replication and survival of bacteria, Energy sources, harvesting from light versus oxidation, regulation of catabolic pathways, chemotaxis. Nitrogen metabolism, iron-scavenging. Alternative electron acceptors: denitrification, sulphate reduction, methanogenesis.  Bacterial evolution, systematic and genomics. Biodiversity; bacteria occurring in the natural environment (soil, water and air), associated with humans, animals, plants, and those of importance in foods and in the water industry.

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  • Module content:

    Organisation and molecular architecture of fungal thalli, chemistry of the fungal cell. Chemical and physiological requirements for growth and nutrient acquisition. Mating and meiosis; spore development; spore dormancy, dispersal and germination. Fungi as saprobes in soil, air, plant, aquatic and marine ecosystems; role of fungi as decomposers and in the deterioration of materials; fungi as predators and parasites; mycoses, mycetisms and mycotoxicoses; fungi as symbionts of plants, insects and animals. Applications of fungi in biotechnology.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection.

    This module is the second in a series of modules that form part of an elective programme aiming to prepare, equip and train the student with music-technology related skills and specialisations. It is designed to provide a thorough, post-introductory audio-related engineering and programming skillset for the candidate. The student enrolled in the elective programme does so with the intention to be trained as an expert in the music-technology field and related disciplines.

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  • Module content:

    Logistics management
    The role of logistics in an enterprise; definition and scope of customer service; electronic and other logistics information systems; inventory management; materials management with special reference to Japanese systems; management of the supply chain. Methods of transport and transport costs; types and costs of warehousing; electronic aids in materials handling; cost and price determination of purchases; organising for logistics management; methods for improving logistics performance.

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  • Module content:

    Project management and negotiations:
    Introduction Project management concepts; needs identification; the project, the project manager and the project team; types of project organisations; project communication and documentation. Planning and control: planning, scheduling and schedule control of projects; resource considerations and allocations; cost planning and performance evaluation.
    Negotiation and collective bargaining: The nature of negotiation; preparation for negotiation; negotiating for purposes of climate creation; persuasive communication; handling conflict and aggression; specialised negotiation and collective bargaining in the South African context.

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  • Module content:

    Counting techniques. Probability theory: Sample spaces, events, rules of probability, conditional probabilities, independent events and Bayes’ theorem. Probability distributions and probability densities: cumulative distribution functions, marginal distributions, joint distributions, conditional distributions and independence. Expected values: Moments, Chebyshev’s theorem, moment-generating functions, product moments, moments of linear combinations of random variables and conditional expectations. Transformation techniques of random variables. Identification, use, evaluation and interpretation of statistical computer packages and statistical techniques.

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  • Module content:

    Special probability distributions: the discrete uniform distribution, Bernoulli distribution, binomial distribution, negative binomial and geometric distribution, the hypergeometric distribution, Poisson distribution and multinomial distribution. Special probability densities: Uniform distribution, gamma, exponential and chi-square distributions, the beta distribution, the normal distribution and the bivariate normal distribution. Functions of random variables. Sampling distributions, point estimation, interval estimation and hypothesis testing. Regression Analysis. Identification, use, evaluation and interpretation of statistical computer packages and statistical techniques.

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Minimum credits: 144

As with the 2nd year elective modules, the 3rd year elective modules follow on from the elective group chosen in first year.  The modules for 3rd year, given per elective group are the following:

  • Data Science (COS 314, COS 326 and STK353)
  • Genetics (COS314 and (COS 326 and COS 344) or (GTS 354 and GTS 367) or (GTS354 and BTC 361))
  • Geographical Information Systems (COS 326, COS 344, GIS 310 and GIS 320)
  • IT and Enterprises ((OBS 359 and OBS 369) or (OBS310 and OBS 320))
  • IT and Law (KRM 310, KRM 320 and KUB 420)
  • IT and Music (Another 3rd year COS module (either COS 314, COS 326, COS 344 or COS 341) and MCS 402)
  • Software Development (COS 326 and INF 354)

Core modules

  • Module content:

    The module exposes students to problems associated with software development on an industrial scale. Overall goals of the module are: to become familiar with the latest trends in software engineering; to understand the software engineering process and to appreciate its complexity; to be exposed to a variety of methodologies for tackling different stages of the software lifecycle; to understand and apply the concepts of systems administration and maintenance; to complete the development of a fairly large object orientation-based software product. The focus of the module is on a project that lasts the whole year. The project is completed in groups of approximately four (4) students and teaches students to take responsibility for a variety of roles within a group, and to understand the different requirements for these; to experience the advantages and problems of working in a group; professionalism with regards to particularly colleagues and clients.
    After the successful completion of this module, the student will be able to: understand the psychology of a client; work in groups; and have an appreciation for planning, designing, implementing and maintaining large projects. These qualities should place the students in a position in which they are able to handle software development in the corporate environment.

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  • Module content:

    This module develops an appreciation of the fundamentals and design principles for information assurance and security. Students will develop a clear understanding of the basic information security services and mechanisms, enabling them to design and evaluate the integration of solutions into the user application environment. Emphasis will be placed on services such as authorisation and confidentiality. Students will  acquire knowledge and skills of Security Models such as the Bell-LaPadula, Harrison-Ruzzo Ullman and Chinese Wall Model. Students will develop a detailed understanding of the confidentiality service by focusing on cryptology and the practical implementation thereof. The student will be introduced to professional and philosophical ethics. At the end of the module students will be able to engage in a debate regarding the impact (local and global) of computers on individuals, organisations and society. The professionalism of IT staff will be discussed against national and international codes of practices such as those of the CSSA, ACM and IEEE.

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  • Module content:

    The objective of this module is to acquaint the student with the terminology of communication systems and to establish a thorough understanding of exactly how data is transferred in such communication networks, as well as applications that can be found in such environments. The study material includes: concepts and terminology, the hierarchy of protocols according to the OSI and TCP/IP models, protocols on the data level, physical level and network level as well as higher level protocols. The practical component of the module involves programming TCP/IP sockets using a high level language. The emphasis throughout is on the technical aspects underlying the operation of networks, rather than the application of networks.

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  • Module content:

    Programming languages are the backbone for software development. Each language has its own different syntax and semantics, but there are many common concepts that can be studied and then illustrated through the languages. The module concentrates on issues of object orientation, including delegation, iteration and polymorphism. It surveys how languages provide the basic building blocks for data and control, as well as exception handling and concurrency. At the end of the module, students will be able to appreciate the rich history behind programming languages, leading to independent principles that evolve over time. They will be skilled at using a variety of programming languages, including new paradigms such as functional, logical and scripting, and will know how to learn a new language with ease. From this experience, they will be able to apply evaluation criteria for choosing an appropriate programming language in a given scenario.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed - requires departmental selection.
    Human-computer Interaction. This module involves a study of human-computer interaction and human-information interaction; humans as computer and information users; and the ethical aspects relating to the creation of multimedia information products. A detailed study of the role, composition and functioning of an interface, underlying principles in the design and evaluation of interfaces, will also be undertaken.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Plant genetics and genomics: gene control in plants, epigenetics, co-suppression, forward and reverse genetics, structural and functional genomics. Plant development: flowering, genetics imprinting. Plant-environment interactions. Crop genetic modification: food security, GMO regulation, plant transformation, whole-chromosome transformation, synthetic biology, homologous recombination. Crop molecular markers: marker types, genotyping, QTL mapping, marker-assisted breeding. Future of crop biotechnology: applications of genomics, biopharming, genetical genomics, systems biology

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  • Module content:

    The main objective of this module is to introduce a selection of topics from artificial intelligence (AI), and to provide the student with the background to implement AI techniques for solving complex problems.
    This module will cover topics from classical AI, as well as more recent AI paradigms. These topics include: search methods, game playing, knowledge representation and reasoning, machine learning, neural networks, genetic algorithms, artificial life, planning methods, and intelligent agents. In the practical part of this module, students will get experience in implementing
    (1) game trees and evolving game-playing agents;
    (2) a neural network and applying it to solve a real-world problem; and
    (3) a genetic algorithm and applying it to solve a real-world problem.

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  • Module content:

    This module builds on a prior introductory module on database technology and provides more advanced theoretical and practical study material for managing large volumes of data, for example, noSQL database systems and MapReduce. The module will consider file system models, for example Hadoop, relevant for big data storage, manipulation at scale, mining and visualisation.  Basic knowledge of parallel decomposition concepts will be included.

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  • Module content:

    The aim of this module is to acquire a sound knowledge of the basic theory of interactive computer graphics and basic computer graphics programming techniques. The theory will cover graphics systems and models, graphics programming, input and interaction, geometric objects and transformations, viewing in 3D, shading, rendering techniques, and introduce advanced concepts, such as object-oriented computer graphics and discrete techniques. The module includes a practical component that enables students to apply and test their knowledge in computer graphics. The OpenGL graphics library and the C programming language will be used for this purpose.

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  • Module content:

    Advanced theory and practice of Geographic Information Systems; GIS applications; design and implementation of GIS applications. A project or assignments of at least 64 notional hours.

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  • Module content:

    Construction of Raster Geovisualisations, spatial model construction and use, multi-criteria decision analysis. Factor analysis: Principle component analysis. Geostatistics: Spatial dependence modelling, ordinary kriging. Markov chains and cellular Automata, combined models. A project or assignment of at least 64 notional hours.

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  • Module content:

    Mechanisms involved in the evolution of genes, genomes and phenotypes. Comparison  of the molecular organisation of viral, archaea, bacterial and eukaryotic genomes. Genome project design, DNA sequencing methods and annotation. Molecular evolution. Phylogenetic inference. Applications of phylogenetics and evolutionary genomics research, including relevance to sustainable development goals for food security, good health and the biosphere.

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  • Module content:

    Genetic and phenotypic variation. Organisation of genetic variation. Random genetic drift. Mutation and the neutral theory. Darwinian selection. Inbreeding, population subdivision and migration. Evolutionary quantitative genetics. Population genomics. Human population genetics. Levels of selection and individuality. Arms races and irreversibility. Complexity. Applied evolution.

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  • Module content:

    Advanced programming.

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB
    (a) Introduction to the study of information and communications technology law:
          – The place of information and communications technology law in the legal  
              system
          – The nature and scope of information and communications technology law
          – Sources of information and communications technology law
          – Inception and influence of the Internet
    (b) Regulation of the Internet:
          – National/International
          – Jurisdiction
    (c) Aspects of intellectual property law and the Internet
    (d) E-commerce activities and the Internet:
          – Aspects of jurisdiction and signing of contracts
          – Data protection and encryption
          – Liability of Internet service providers
    (e) Advertising and the Internet
    (f)  Criminal liability in information and communications technology law
    (g) Constitutional aspects in information and communications technology law:
          – The right to privacy/freedom of expression/information

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection.

    Aspects of music technology: This module is the third and final in a series of modules that form part of an elective programme aiming to prepare, equip and train the student with music-technology related skills and specialisations. It is designed to provide an advanced and thorough, audio-related engineering and programming skillset for the candidate. The student enrolled in the elective programme does so with the intention to be trained as an expert in the music-technology field and related disciplines.

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  • Module content:

    Strategy formulation: the deliberate strategy process of formulating a vision and mission statement, conducting internal and external environmental analyses and selecting appropriate strategies. It will enhance an understanding of the level of strategy formulation, gaining competitive advantage in your market place and thinking strategically.

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  • Module content:

    Strategy execution: Strategic management implementation. The role of management in strategy implementation; budgets as instrument in the implementation process; leading processes of change within enterprises; supporting policies, procedures and information systems for implementation in the various functional areas; evaluation and control of implementation. South African case studies to create contextual relevance.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to international management
    International business management; the process of internationalisation; growth in international trade and investment; the evolution of multinational enterprises; management perspectives on international trade and international trade theories; international trade regulation; economic integration; the formation of trading blocks, and free-trade areas.
    The international business environment
    The cultural environment of international business; the political and legal environments as well as the economic environment of international business; the international monetary system; the foreign exchange market; and international capital markets.

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  • Module content:

    International financial management
    Purpose, scope and principles of international financial management; international cashflow management; foreign exchange risk and foreign exchange risk management; international investment and financing decisions; import and export management; import and export financing, and international purchasing and sourcing.
    International management, leadership and market entry
    International management and leadership; dimensions of strategic international human resource management; international market entry and introduction to international marketing strategy, and future perspectives on Southern Africa as an emerging market.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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