Yearbooks

Programme: BVSc

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
08130005 Faculty of Veterinary Science Minimum duration of study: 6 years Total credits: 877

Programme information

This programme is accredited with the South African Veterinary Council (SAVC), Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) and the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council (AVBC).

Each student must apply immediately after registration at UP, to the Registrar of the South African Veterinary Council for registration as a student in Veterinary Science. Registration is compulsory and must be renewed annually for the duration of the study.

After the degree has been conferred, graduates are required to register with the South African Veterinary Council as veterinarians before they may practise in South Africa in this capacity.

Also refer to:

UP General Regulations and Rules
http://www.up.ac.za/yearbooks/rules/content/R02

Examinations and related matters
https://www1.up.ac.za/cs/groups/staff/@contrib/documents/document/mdaw/mdm5/~edisp/uppr039909.pdf

 

Admission requirements

  • Entry into the BVSc programme is highly competitive due to popularity of the programme and limited available spaces.
  • Selection is based on academic merit. The Faculty does not determine specific selection cut-off values as these are determined by the strength of the applications in a particular year.
  • School-leavers

A valid NSC/IEB/Cambridge qualification with admission for degree purposes.

Subject requirements and the required Admission Point Score (APS) as indicated in the table below. The APS is calculated from the achievement levels obtained in the six 20-credit subjects of the NSC.

Life Orientation is excluded when calculating the APS.

Conditional admission is based on Grade 11 final examination results, final admission on NSC/IEB performance in Mathematics, English and Physical Science, as well as the Veterinary Value-added Form (VVAF).

Additional admission criteria may be used including an interview and additional selection tests.

School-leaving applicants who are conditionally admitted based on their Grade 11 results will forfeit their placement if their NSC APS is more than 2 points lower than the Grade 11 APS used for conditional admission.

  • Applicants with previous higher education exposure

There is an opportunity for students with previous higher education experience to also apply for the BVSc programme.

Placement in either the first or second year of the BVSc programme will depend on, among others, merit and subject choices.

  • International students

A small number of international students may be admitted to the programme, including those from neighbouring Southern African Development Community (SADC) countries.

Applicants who are accepted receive a letter of confirmation from the University, which will facilitate their application for a study permit.

A valid study permit, obtained in the country of origin, is a prerequisite for registration.

The National Benchmark Test (NBT) may be required from international applicants. (www.nbt.ac.za)

International applicants must comply with all UP's and the Department of Home Affairs' regulations related to international students.

 

Minimum requirements

Achievement level

English Home Language or English First Additional Language

Mathematics

Physical Science 

APS

NSC/IEB

AS Level

NSC/IEB

AS Level

NSC/IEB

AS Level

5

C

5

C

5

C

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*  Cambridge A level candidates who obtained at least a D in the required subjects, will be considered for admission. International Baccalaureate (IB) HL candidates who obtained at least a 4 in the required subjects, will be considered for admission.

Additional requirements

Submission of the Veterinary Value Added Form is not a requirement, but is recommended in order to improve an applicant’s chance for selection, since the score obtained contributes 20% towards the final score used for selection. 

Examinations and pass requirements

These rules will only be applicable to modules that fall within the Faculty of Veterinary Science.

Also refer to UP General Regulations and Rules

  1. Attendance of all lectures, practicals and clinical duties is compulsory. Any form of absence must be justified by submission of a medical certificate or valid documentation, within three working days after returning. Failure to comply may lead to examination refusal.
  2. No minimum semester/year mark is required for admission to the examination.
  3. The semester/year marks and examination mark will count 50% each towards the final mark.
  4. A student is required to obtain a subminimum of 40% in the examination as well as a final mark of at least 50% to pass a module. A subminimum of 40% in subdivisions of theoretical and/or practical examinations may be required as stipulated by the Dean in consultation with the relevant head of department, and as set out in the study guide.
  5. A student must pass all the modules of the respective previous year of study in order to be promoted to the subsequent year of study.
  6. A student who fails a module in year 1,2 or 3, has to repeat all the failed modules for that particular year of study.

A fourth, fifth or final year student who fails a module or modules in a year of study, has to repeat, all the modules for that particular year of study, except modules which were passed with a final mark of at least 65%, for which full exemption is granted. 

During the repeat year, exemption from the examination is granted for a module that was passed in the previous year with a final mark of less than 65%; if at least 80% of the practical periods were attended and a year/semester mark of at least 50% was obtained.

Examinations are compulsory in all the modules previously failed, as well as in those modules in which exemption from the examination has not been obtained. If a student fails any of these examinations (or supplementary examination), he or she will be excluded from the programme and will not be permitted to continue.

  1. The content, format and duration of the supplementary, extra-ordinary, and/or special examination will be similar to that of the examination, except for oral examinations, where the supplementary, extra-ordinary, and/or special examination may be in a different format.
  2. Students who have obtained a semester/year mark of 65% or more in a particular module may be promoted according to UP’s general regulations. Departments will be allowed to use discretion in this regard. The rule will be stated in the study guide of the respected module.
  3. Examinations are conducted as stipulated in the Faculty Calendar.
  4. A student will not be allowed to repeat the same year of study twice.

Exclusion
Students who have not passed the equivalent off at least 50% of semester modules enrolled for in a particular year of study, including dropped modules will be excluded and will not be allowed to re-register in the next year. 

Re-admission
A student who has to discontinue his or her studies or has been excluded may apply in writing to the Faculty Admissions Committee for re-admission. 

Practical/clinical/internship information

Compulsory Community Service
After completing the degree a Compulsory Community Service (CCS) year is required by the state. Graduates will be employed for one year of Compulsory Community Service by the national Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries.  More information can be obtained from DAFF. 

Clinical experience (including practical work)
Proof of satisfactory completion of prescribed clinical and practical components of the programme as prescribed below must be submitted to the Head: Student Administration of the Faculty, prior to the commencement of the final examinations. Failure to do so may lead to examination refusal.

  • In state control of stock diseases and administration: experience at an approved institution as approved by the Dean.
  • Practical and clinical experience at the Faculty and at approved private practices as well as other institutions as approved by the Dean.

Pass with distinction

The BVSc degree is conferred with distinction on a student who has obtained a cumulative weighted average of at least 75% over the last three years of study.

Minimum credits: 122

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Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Simple statistical analysis: Data collection and analysis: Samples, tabulation, graphical representation, describing location, spread and skewness. Introductory probability and distribution theory. Sampling distributions and the central limit theorem. Statistical inference: Basic principles, estimation and testing in the one- and two-sample cases (parametric and non-parametric). Introduction to experimental design. One- and twoway designs, randomised blocks. Multiple statistical analysis: Bivariate data sets: Curve fitting (linear and non-linear), growth curves. Statistical inference in the simple regression case. Categorical analysis: Testing goodness of fit and contingency tables. Multiple regression and correlation: Fitting and testing of models. Residual analysis. Computer literacy: Use of computer packages in data analysis and report writing.

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  • Module content:

    Theory: Introduction to general chemistry: Measurement in chemistry, matter and energy, atomic theory and the periodic table, chemical compounds and chemical bonds; quantitative relationships in chemical reactions, states of matter and the kinetic theory; solutions and colloids, acids, bases and ionic compounds, chemical equilibria. Introduction to organic chemistry: Chemical bonding in organic compounds, nature, physical properties and nomenclature of simple organic molecules, isomerism, chemical properties of alkanes and cycloalkanes, alkenes, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and esters, amines and amides, carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids.
    Practicals.

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  • Module content:

    Chromosomes and cell division. Principles of Mendelian inheritance: locus and alleles, dominance interactions, extensions and modifications of basic principles.. Probability studies. Sex determination and sex linked traits. Pedigree analysis. Genetic linkage and chromosome mapping. Chromosome variation.

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  • Module content:

     Introduction to the molecular structure and function of the cell. Basic chemistry of the cell. Structure and composition of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Ultrastructure and function of cellular organelles, membranes and the cytoskeleton. General principles of energy, enzymes and cell metabolism. Selected processes, e.g. glycolysis, respiration and/or photosynthesis. Introduction to molecular genetics: DNA structure and replication, transcription, translation. Cell growth and cell division.

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  • Module content:

    The acquisition of a basic medical orientated vocabulary compiled from Latin and Greek stem forms combined with prefixes and suffixes derived from those languages. The manner in which the meanings of medical terms can be determined by analysing the terms into their recognisable meaningful constituent parts, is taught and exercised. The functional use of medical terms in context as practical outcome of terminological application is continually attended to.

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  • Module content:

    Units, vectors, one dimensional kinematics, dynamics, work, equilibrium, sound, liquids, heat, thermodynamic processes, electric potential and capacitance, direct current and alternating current, optics, modern physics, radio activity.

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  • Module content:

    The focus of the five-year programme on veterinary professional life is on professional and competency development. It also aims to contribute to the development of competencies to enable veterinarians to be consummate professionals capable of dealing with the diverse challenges of professional and everyday life. The VPL 100 module specifically aims to expose students to the diversity of opportunities and career paths in the veterinary profession.  It also provides a holistic introduction to human-animal interaction from a veterinary perspective, emphasising the role of animal ethics and welfare in veterinary science.

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  • Module content:

    *Students will not be credited for more than one of the following modules for their degree: WTW 134, WTW 165, WTW 114, WTW 158. WTW 165 does not lead to Mathematics at 200 level and is intended for students who require Mathematics at 100 level only. WTW 165 is offered in English in the second semester only to students who have applied in the first semester of the current year for the approximately 65 MBChB, or the 5-6 BChD places becoming available in the second semester and who were therefore enrolled for MGW 112 in the first semester of the current year.

    Functions, derivatives, interpretation of the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of differentiation, integration, interpretation of the definite integral, applications of integration, matrices, solutions of systems of equations. All topics are studied in the context of applications.

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  • Module content:

    Animal classification, phylogeny, organization and terminology. Evolution of the various animal phyla, morphological characteristics and life cycles of parasitic and non-parasitic animals. Structure and function of reproductive, respiratory, excretory, circulatory and digestive systems.

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Minimum credits: 144

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    Anatomical terminology, early embryonic development, central and autonomic nervous systems, cutaneous appendages and musculature, thoracic limb, pelvis, pelvic limb and  the head of the major domestic species. Basic avian anatomy.

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  • Module content:

    General introduction to microbiology, bacteriology and mycoplasmology, pathogenesis of bacterial and mycoplasmal infections, rickettsiales and pathogenesis of infection,  chlamydiales and pathogenesis of infection, general introduction to fungi and   pathogenesis of infection, general introduction to viruses and pathogenesis of infection,  laboratory diagnosis of infectious diseases, normal flora of selected organ systems in  domestic animals.

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  • Module content:

    The husbandry of and common procedures performed on key domestic species, behavioral principles of key domestic species, handling skills for key domestic animals, aspects of animal welfare.

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  • Module content:

    ntroduction to the concepts of animal production systems in South African production environments. Principles and requirements for extensive, semi-intensive and intensive livestock production with reference to large and small stock, poultry and pigs. Principles of communal farming systems in Southern Africa. Game management systems with reference to conservation and game farming. The role of the human in livestock production systems and sustainable production.

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  • Module content:

    Overview of the immune system, structure of antibodies, biosynthesis of immunoglobulins, antigen-receptor interaction, complement, humoral immune response, cellular immune response, selected immunodiagnostic techniques, vaccinology, basic principles of immunity to infectious and parasitic diseases.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to adaptation physiology with reference to origin and domestication of farm and companion animals. Livestock species, breed development and diversity. Principles of applied animal breeding, quantitative and qualitative inheritance. Trait classification and factors influencing genetic progress in farm animals. Introduction to animal nutrition with the focus on feed intake, digestibility and metabolism of feeds in both monogastric and ruminant animals. Classification of feedstuffs and the nutritive value in the diet for the different farm animal species. An introduction to applied nutrition and feeding of monogastric and ruminant animals, equine and companion animals.

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  • Module content:

    The light microscope, structure and function of cells and tissues, the endocrine system, the nervous system, the integument, muscle structure and function, haematology, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, metabolic pathways and the digestive system, the urinary system, the reproductive system, basic avian physiology and thermoregulation.

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  • Module content:

    The focus of the five-year programme on veterinary professional life is on professional and competency development. It also aims to contribute to the development of competencies to enable veterinarians to be consummate professionals capable of dealing with the diverse challenges of professional and everyday life. The VPL 121 module specifically aims to expose students to the diversity of opportunities and career paths in the veterinary profession

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  • Module content:

    Information management, societal roles and responsibilities of veterinarians, cultural diversity and group skills, leadership, stress management.

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  • Module content:

    Basic principles of pasture science: the influence of biotic and abiotic factors on the productivity of different strata and components of natural and planted pastures. This will enable the student to understand the management, production, appropriate and optimal utilisation as well as the conservation of these pastures. These principles can be used to ensure sustainable animal production and health.

    One large assignment to be completed during recess in addition to lecture time.

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Minimum credits: 135

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    General principles of surgery, applicable to all species. Principles of surgical asepsis, disinfection and sterilisation, suture materials and patterns, surgical haemostasis, traumatology, wound healing, wound infection, wound management, small animal bandages and surgical instrumentation.

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  • Module content:

    Definitions and common causes of basic lesions in tissues and organs. Pathogenesis of basic lesions including, reversible cell injury, pigmentations, necrosis, apoptosis, circulatory disturbances, inflammation, immunopathology, growth disturbances and neoplasia. Organ pathology (with the emphasis on macroscopic changes and pathogenesis) of selected conditions of the various organ systems of the body.

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  • Module content:

    Diagnostic focus: Introduction to common diagnostic procedures used in key domestic animals including clinical examination, clinical pathology, pain assessment and sedation in relation to clinical examination, basic epidemiological concepts, basic diagnostic imaging modalities and radiation safety.

    Clinical physiology focus: The aim is to explain the pathophysiology of commonly occurring clinical conditions and the attempts by the body to re-establish homeostasis. This section of IVD 300 relies heavily on the VPH 200 module for its foundation.

    Veterinary research focus: IVD 300 also include a section on the role of research in veterinary science, literature reviews, research design, the role of laboratory animals in veterinary research and examples of research.

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  • Module content:

    General principles of veterinary toxicology, with emphasis on the relevant factors and circumstances contributing to poisoning; advanced toxicology with regard to inorganic and organic compounds, fungi, cyanobacteria, plants, rodenticides, zootoxins, etc. Plant poisonings, mycotoxicoses and inorganic and organic poisonings are discussed under the following headings: epidemiology and species affected, description, identification, distribution and poisonous principle (if applicable), mechanism of action, toxicity, clinical signs, pathology (limited to the most important lesions); diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment and control of prevention. A pressed plant collection or a poisonous plant collection in digital format has to be submitted.

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  • Module content:

    Veterinary infectious diseases is a module aimed at providing the student with in-depth knowledge of all aspects of diseases of food-producing and companion animals caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi and prions. The module is structured to enable students to discern which infectious diseases of animals are high impact diseases and which are of lesser significance in order of importance. The module covers the morphological and physico-chemical characteristics of the causative organisms and the epidemiology and pathogenesis of the diseases caused by them. Course candidates will also learn how to diagnose these diseases in both the living and dead animal, and the control strategies applicable, including control at the livestock/wildlife/human interface. Finally, course candidates will learn about the socio-economic importance of infectious diseases of animals with special reference to transboundary spread.

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  • Module content:

    Principles of ethnoveterinary knowledge comprising indigenous, plant-based approaches to animal health and wellbeing; association of plant secondary metabolites with biological activity and toxicity; interaction of ethnoveterinary medicine with orthodox veterinary care; community benefits of ethnoveterinary medicine.

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  • Module content:

    General principles of pharmaceuticals, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacotherapeutics. Regulatory control of veterinary medicines and dispensing requirements. A study of groups of functional, systemic and chemotherapeutic drugs utilised in general veterinary practice with emphasis on their pharmacological effects, general indication, safety and side effects.

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  • Module content:

    This module continues with aspects of leadership and diverse personality types and builds on the framework presented earlier in the modules VPL 120 and VPL 200. The aim is to evaluate personal growth during the preceding two years and formulate personal goals for the next two years.  Emotional intelligence (EQ) is included in the module and deals with the core skills of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness and relationship management. The module also deals with communication-, conflict management- and negotiation skills with particular reference to the veterinary profession. The module is concluded with basic concepts of financial skills (personal financial fitness), e.g. budgeting (personal and organisational), balance sheets and financial statements (basic understanding) as a precursor to the teaching of more detailed business management principles in the module VPL 510.

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  • Module content:

    The objective of the module is to provide fundamentals of applied veterinary helminthology, ectoparasitology and protozoology as required by veterinarians. The module covers the life cycles, relevant morphological features, epidemiology and pathogenesis of important parasites of domestic animals. Candidates will also learn how to diagnose infections/infestations and diseases in life and dead animals as well as how to treat and control them. Where applicable, emphasis is also given on zoonotic implications.

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Minimum credits: 142

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    Prepare for safe general anaesthesia; premedication; trachea intubation; induction and maintenance of intravenous and inhalation anaesthesia; recovery from anaesthesia; local anaesthesia and pain management; anaesthetic complications.

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  • Module content:

    Diagnosis and treatment of anaemia, polycythaemia, leukocyte kinetics, lymphohaemopoietic neoplasia; diagnosis and treatment of haemostatic abnormalities; diagnostic use of serum biochemistry, faecal and blood tests, urinalysis; cytology.

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  • Module content:

    Principles of diagnostic imaging; diagnostic imaging of the abdomen, thorax, head, appendicular system and the vertebral column in dogs and cats; diagnostic imaging of the appendicular system in horses and production animals.

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  • Module content:

    Planning and conducting necropsies; diagnostic approach to fatal conditions and diseases of dogs, cats and horses.

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  • Module content:

    Topics presented within an evidence-based medicine and clinical decision-making framework: basic concepts of epidemiology and disease transmission, measures of disease in populations, precision and bias, causal inference, measures of association, epidemiological study design, sampling methods, disease outbreak investigation and principles of diagnostic tests.

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  • Module content:

    Lameness: disorders of the front and hind limb; disorders of the spine; fractures and emergencies; muscular disorders; insurance examinations; identification, diagnosis and treatment of important cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, nervous system, urinary, skin, multi-systemic and respiratory disorders/diseases; hydration status and correction of fluid imbalances; the equine neonate: clinical examination, diagnostic tests and selected disorders.

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  • Module content:

    Patient assessment; therapeutic and monitoring plans for selected key critical situations; identification, diagnosis and treatment of important cardiovascular, respiratory, kidney, skin, endocrine and eye conditions/diseases; multi-systemic conditions; dentistry; oncology; behaviour-related disorders and treatment, critical care and traumatology in dogs and cats. 

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  • Module content:

    Patient assessment; therapeutic and monitoring plans for selected key critical situations; identification, diagnosis and treatment of important gastrointestinal, liver, pancreas, peritoneal, urogenital, skin, musculoskeletal, nervous system; dentistry in dogs and cats.

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  • Module content:

    The veterinarian in context: political roles and responsibilities; collegiality and professional associations; veterinary law and ethics; stressors and stress management.

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  • Module content:

    The female reproductive cycle; parturition and puerperium; control of reproduction; identification, diagnosis and treatment of important diseases or malfunctions of the female reproductive system; identification, diagnosis and treatment of conditions of the neonate; male reproductive processes; identification, diagnosis and treatment of important diseases or malfunctions of the male reproductive system; venereal diseases in domestic animals; optimisation of breeding; investigation of infertility.

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Minimum credits: 181

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    The pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and control of diseases in cattle. Aspects of clinical veterinary science, including components of clinical diagnosis, therapeutics, medicine, surgery and introductory herd health.

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  • Module content:

    Planning and conducting necropsies; diagnostic approach to fatal conditions and diseases of small stock and cattle.

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  • Module content:

    Topics presented within an evidence-based medicine and clinical decision-making framework: basic concepts of epidemiology and disease transmission, measures of disease in populations, precision and bias, causal inference, measures of association, epidemiological study design, sampling methods, disease outbreak investigation, and principles of diagnostic tests.

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  • Module content:

    An encompassing approach including case studies, peer instruction and practical group work will enable the student to acquire, understand and apply knowledge regarding small stock production systems.  Nutrition, parasite management, disease management, technology and economics will be dealt with.

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  • Module content:

    Practical application of the theoretical aspects of small animal, production animal, equine and state veterinary practice covered in the core curriculum of the BVSc programme.  Topics include medicine, surgery, reproduction, diagnostic imaging, pathology and clinical pathology, ophthalmology, dentistry and anaesthesiology of cats, dogs, cattle, small stock and horses, herd/flock health, epidemiology, economics, drug regulations, certification, animal health- and import/export regulations, veterinary public health, veterinary business management and veterinary professional life skills. The emphasis of practical exposure will be on attaining of the Day One Competencies for graduating veterinary professionals.

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  • Module content:

    The purpose of this module is to give students additional exposure in a practice area of interest. The aim is to provide the graduate with theoretical and practical exposure to strengthen Day 1 competencies in those components of veterinary science needed for him/her to enter the particular career path with confidence. The scope of the module is expansion, integration and practical application of knowledge established through the core component of the BVSc programme. Students will complete one of the following six practice areas: Small Animal and Exotic Practice, Rural and Wildlife Practice, Veterinary Public Health and State Veterinary Practice, Equine Practice, Intensive Animal Production Practice, and Veterinary Research Career.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to the One Health concept; emerging and endemic infectious diseases at human/animal interfaces; veterinary issues at human/wildlife interfaces in southern Africa; One Health approaches at human/animal/ecosystem interfaces; animal health, conservation and rural development at interfaces in southern Africa; communication and collaboration between multiple disciplines.

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  • Module content:

    The role of the veterinary surgeon in veterinary public health. Veterinary food hygiene and nutrition-related diseases of importance regarding food of animal origin. Meat and milk hygiene; all necessary measures, including legislation, to ensure that food of animal origin is safe, sound and wholesome at all stages of production and manufacture, up to the consumer. Veterinary aspects of environmental health. Zoonosis in veterinary science. Introduction of the use of laboratory animals in biomedical research and relevant aspects relating to animal welfare. Introduction to the social aspects of the human-animal interaction by protecting and promoting human health in communities, veterinary extension and risk communication.

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  • Module content:

    This module will deal with business management including basic financial reporting and development of a business plan. Marketing, promotion and sales will be studied in terms of marketing oneself and one’s business. Human resources management will be approached from the perspective of staff recruitment and retention, work place discipline, as well as recognition and rewards for good work performance and application of the Labour Law in the work place. The module will be concluded with strategic client service and management that will focus on client satisfaction and dissatisfaction, approaches to deal with different categories of clients and compassion fatigue and its components.

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  • Module content:

    Wildlife management; principles of capture; selected viral, bacterial, protozoal, ecto- and endoparasitic and nutritional diseases of wildlife; legislation pertaining to wildlife; conservation of iconic species of wildlife.

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Minimum credits: 159

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    Practical application of the theoretical aspects of small animal, production animal, equine and state veterinary practice covered in the core curriculum of the BVSc programme.  Topics include medicine, surgery, reproduction, diagnostic imaging, pathology and clinical pathology, ophthalmology, dentistry and anaesthesiology of cats, dogs, cattle, small stock and horses, herd/flock health, epidemiology, economics, drug regulations, certification, animal health- and import/export regulations, veterinary public health, veterinary business management and veterinary professional life skills. The emphasis of practical exposure will be on attaining of the Day One Competencies for graduating veterinary professionals.

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  • Module content:

    Practical application of the theoretical aspects of small animal, production animal, equine and state veterinary practice covered in the core curriculum of the BVSc programme.  Topics include medicine, surgery, reproduction, diagnostic imaging, pathology and clinical pathology, ophthalmology, dentistry and anaesthesiology of cats, dogs, cattle, small stock and horses, herd/flock health, epidemiology, economics, drug regulations, certification, animal health- and import/export regulations, veterinary public health, veterinary business management and veterinary professional life skills. The emphasis of practical exposure will be on attaining of the Day One Competencies for graduating veterinary professionals.

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  • Module content:

    The purpose of this module is to give students additional exposure in a practice area of interest. The aim is to provide the graduate with theoretical and practical exposure to strengthen Day 1 competencies in those components of veterinary science needed for him/her to enter the particular career path with confidence. The scope of the module is expansion, integration and practical application of knowledge established through the core component of the BVSc programme. Students will complete one of the following six practice areas: Small Animal and Exotic Practice, Rural and Wildlife Practice, Veterinary Public Health and State Veterinary Practice, Equine Practice, Intensive Animal Production Practice, and Veterinary Research Career.

     

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  • Module content:

    The purpose of this module is to give students additional exposure in a practice area of interest. The aim is to provide the graduate with theoretical and practical exposure to strengthen Day 1 competencies in those components of veterinary science needed for him/her to enter the particular career path with confidence. The scope of the module is expansion, integration and practical application of knowledge established through the core component of the BVSc programme. Students will complete one of the following six practice areas: Small Animal and Exotic Practice, Rural and Wildlife Practice, Veterinary Public Health and State Veterinary Practice, Equine Practice, Intensive Animal Production Practice, and Veterinary Research Career.

     

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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