Yearbooks

Programme: MCom Industrial Psychology (Coursework)

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
07250144 Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences Minimum duration of study: 1 year Total credits: 180
Contact:
Mrs C Smit
[email protected]
+27 (0)124203108

Programme information

The MCom Industrial Psychology is an accredited programme by the Board of Psychology with the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA). This magister programme entails course work in the first year (seven modules), and in the second year of study students need to complete their mini-dissertation and their internship. The course work is presented over four block weeks during the first year of study.

Admission requirements

  • BCom Honours degree in Human Resource Management or Industrial and Organisational Psychology passed with an average of at least 65%.
  • Psychometrics or equivalent at Honours level.
  • Student numbers are limited. 
  • The head of department may set additional admission requirements. 
  • The number of students will be determined in line with the growth strategy of the University of Pretoria as approved by the Executive. 
  • Allowance will be made for the diversity profile of students.

Additional requirements

  • A candidate may be refused admission to a master’s degree by the relevant head of the department if he/she does not comply with the standard of competence in the subject as determined by the department – with the provision that a candidate who does not comply with the required level of competence, may be admitted, provided that he/she completes additional study assignments and/or examinations.
  • The postgraduate selection committee concerned may set additional admission requirements. 
  • Specific departments have specific requirements for admission. 
  • The number of students will be determined in line with the growth strategy of the University of Pretoria as approved by the Executive. 
  • The diversity profile of students will be aligned with the UP diversity objectives.

Other programme-specific information

The pass mark for both a dissertation and a mini-dissertation is 50%. The provisions regarding pass requirements for dissertations, contained in General Regulation G.12.2, apply mutatis mutandis to mini-dissertations. A pass mark of at least 50% is required in the examination of each module.

The research component of the degree contributes 50% toward the total requirements for the degree. The research component is represented by the Research in Practice module and the mini-dissertation. The degree programme requires that a mini-dissertation/research article must be submitted in a field of study chosen from the fields covered for the honours degree, provided that the Dean may, on the recommendation of the relevant head of department, approve the replacement of the required dissertation by the successful completion of a prescribed number of module credits and a mini-dissertation/research article. Information on modules, credits and syllabi is available, on request, from the relevant head of department. 

A module in Research Methodology is compulsory in all programmes. The Dean may, on the recommendation of the relevant head of department, waive the prerequisites. In this case, the Research in Practice (IPS 806) will replace the Research Methodology module.

For examination purposes, a student must, in consultation with the supervisor, submit a sufficient number of bound copies of the mini-dissertation or research article, printed on good quality paper and of good letter quality to the postgraduate administrator at the relevant department. Permission to submit the mini-dissertation or research article in unbound form may be obtained from the supervisor concerned on condition that a copy of the final approved dissertation is presented to the examiners in bound format or electronic format.

In addition to the copies already mentioned, each successful student must submit a bound paper copy as well as two electronic copies of the approved dissertation to the Head: Student Administration in the format specified by the faculty and in accordance with the minimum standards set by the Department of Library Services, before 15 February for the Autumn graduation ceremonies and before 15 July for the Spring graduation ceremonies, failing which the degree will only be conferred during a subsequent series of graduation ceremonies.

Examinations and pass requirements

The pass mark for both a dissertation and a mini-dissertation is 50%. The provisions regarding pass requirements for dissertations, contained in General Regulation G.12.2, apply mutatis mutandis to mini-dissertations. A pass mark of at least 50% is required in the examination of each module.

Research information

The mini-dissertation contributes 50% toward the total requirements for the degree.

Dissertations/mini-dissertations, curricula and modules

  1. The degree programme requires that a dissertation/mini-dissertation must be submitted in a field of study chosen from the fields covered for the honours degree, provided that the Dean may, on the recommendation of the relevant head of department/Postgraduate Committee, approve the replacement of the required dissertation by the successful completion of a prescribed number of module credits and a mini-dissertation/research article.
  2. Information on modules, credits and syllabi is available, on request, from the relevant head of department/Postgraduate Committee.
  3. A module in Research Methodology is compulsory in all programmes. The Dean may, on the recommendation of the relevant head of department/Postgraduate Committee, waive the prerequisites.
  4. Sufficient number of bound copies of the dissertation/mini-dissertation must be submitted to the Head: Student Administration for examination, after permission is granted by the supervisor.

Article for publication
The Dean may require, before or on submission of a dissertation/mini-dissertation, the submission of a draft article for publication to the supervisor. The draft article should be based on the research that the student has conducted for the dissertation/mini-dissertation and be approved by the supervisor concerned. The supervisor should then have the opportunity to take the paper through all the processes of revision and resubmission as may be necessary and/or appropriate in order to achieve publication.

Submission of dissertation/mini-dissertation
A dissertation/mini-dissertation is submitted to the Head: Student Administration/departmental Postgraduate Office, before the closing date for the various graduation ceremonies as announced annually.

For examination purposes, a student must, in consultation with the supervisor, submit a sufficient number of bound copies and/or e-copies of the dissertation/mini-dissertation, printed on good quality paper and of good letter quality, to the Head: Student Administration/departmental Postgraduate Office. Permission to submit the dissertation/mini-dissertation in unbound form may be obtained from the supervisor concerned on condition that a copy of the final approved dissertation/mini-dissertation is presented to the examiners in bound format or electronic format.

In addition to the copies already mentioned, each successful student must submit a bound paper copy as well as two electronic copies of the approved dissertation/mini-dissertation to the Head: Student Administration/departmental Postgraduate Office in the format specified by the faculty and in accordance with the minimum standards set by the Department of Library Services, before 15 February for the Autumn graduation ceremonies and before 15 July for the Spring graduation ceremonies, failing which the degree will only be conferred during a subsequent series of graduation ceremonies.

Pass with distinction

In order to be awarded the degree with distinction, a student must meet the following criteria:

  • Obtain a Grade Point Average of at least 75% including at least 75% in the mini-dissertation;
  • Complete the degree/diploma within the minimum period prescribed;
  • Only the final mark of the first attempt to pass the modules or dissertation will be considered and
  • The GPA will be not be rounded up to a whole number.

Minimum credits: 180

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Fairness in employment decision-making and selections. Know how to analyse jobs and work, and apply work force planning effectively.

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  • Module content:

    Exploring the history of leadership theory and implement contemporary approaches to understanding leadership. This module aims students to design and deliver a leadership development programme.

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  • Module content:

    Students will be exposed to the fundamental principles underlying human behaviour. The module is offered in three different parts:

    Part 1: Professional Practice 

    • Background and understanding of Industrial Psychologist roles and practices. 
    • Collaboration with other health care professionals. 
    • Improving competence and skills as an Industrial Psychologist
    • Professional development,

    Part 2: Work-Related Psychopathology 

    • The diagnosis of workplace related psychopathology (e.g. stress and burnout) and general psychopathology (e.g. depression, psychological trauma). Know the signs, symptoms and know when to refer and the relevant referral options.
    • Know and understand the physical and psychological health challenges that impact on employee wellness/well-being and how to apply models of intervention.

    Part 3: Career Psychology

    • Career counselling interventions, 
    • Life skills and career development. 
    • Career development for South Africa (Indigenous Knowledge Systems)

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  • Module content:

    Obtain advance understanding in the use of psychological assessments within the field of industrial psychology; Test and apply psychological assessment in the work context pertaining to career advancement, personal advancement, recruitment and selection; Know how to utilise psychological assessment practices on an ethical manner within the scope of industrial psychology; Understand the use of Assessment Centres (AC) theory and practices within the context of the contemporary organisation.

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  • Module content:

    The objective of IOP Professional Ethics module is to broaden your awareness and understanding on ethical principles in relation to the various roles that an IOP will perform and how to apply these standards in the workplace.  All professions, including IOPs, are bound by ethical principles to ensure conformance to the standards of moral conduct of our professions and the clients that we serve.

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  • Module content:

    The significance of this module lies on three levels. Firstly, this module will require students to get to grips with the psychology of change in individuals and groups. Secondly, it will require students to build their own mental model of a changing post-modern society and of the organisation as change territory in order to have a full understanding of the nature and dynamics of organisational change. The third level of significance lies in the module’s requirement to integrate this contextualised theory of change in a framework to effectively deal with the dynamics of change and change interventions in a contemporary organisation.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Research Proposal & Design
    Design a research project by formulating the framework of the study by means of a problem statement, literature review, development of research objectives/questions/hypotheses and stipulating the methodology.

    Part 2: Qualitative and Quantitative research
    Designing quantitative and qualitative research methodology by understanding and applying the relevant approaches, designs, paradigms, sampling procedures, data collection and data analyses methods. Understand what is implied with quality control measures in quantitative and qualitative research.

    Part 3: Statistics and Computer- Based Data Analysis

    • Know how to use SPSS and AMOS for quantitative data analyses, and how to select appropriate statistics for a variety of research questions and justify the choices from both the perspective of the design as well as the data requirements
    • Know how to conduct basic statistical analysis on SPSS and interpret the results (T-tests, ANOVA, Cross-tabs, Correlations, Descriptive statistics – both parametric and non-parametric equivalents) 
    • Know how to evaluate the psychometric properties of a scale using either exploratory factor analysis (EFA) or confirmatory factor analysis (CFA).
    • Understand the rationale and testing for measurement invariance using a CFA approach and how to evaluate model fit in SEM/CFA approach.
    • Know how to compare nested and non-nested models in SEM and understand the difference between moderation and mediation.
    • Be able to apply ethical research in practice, critically reflect on own, and other’s research and apply the APA guidelines for writing academically
       

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  • Module content:

    Research component (Industrial Psychology mini-dissertation) can be done concurrently with other modules in first year with allowance to finish in second year of study. 

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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