Yearbooks

Programme: BAHons Criminology

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
01240262 Faculty of Humanities Minimum duration of study: 1 year Total credits: 120

Programme information

Closing date for applications: 31 July annually.

Admission requirements

  • An appropriate bachelor’s degree.
  • Pass all undergraduate Criminology modules (level 1,2 and 3) as well as at least 70% in each of the final-year modules in Criminology.
  • Only a limited number of students are admitted to this programme.

Additional requirements

• A compulsory module KRM 701 Methodology must be passed as a prerequisite for KRM 781.

Minimum credits: 120

Core modules

  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    In this module the focus is on the way in which research is undertaken. This knowledge is essential because it serves as the basis for further study as well as research that may have to be undertaken within a future career. Aspects that are addressed include the following: what does scientific research entail; how is a research problem stated and hypothesis formulated; how are samples drawn; which methods could be used for collecting data; how is the data analysed, interpreted and presented in the research report.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    Various theories explaining the causes of crime are studied. Because most of the existing theories were developed in the United States of America, attention is given to the possibility of using these theories within the South African context.

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  • Module content:

    Victimology involves the scientific study of the crime victim. Examples of themes to which attention are given include the following: Restorative justice, victimisation vulnerability of women and children, susceptibility of farmers and farm workers to victimisation, victims of vehicle hijacking, victims of human trafficking and the victimisation vulnerability of foreign migrants.

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  • Module content:

    In psychocriminology attention is given to psychological disorders that may lead to the committing of crime, or that are regarded as criminal in nature by the legal system and psychological disorders that may occur as a result of having been the victim of crime. Specific themes to which attention are given include the following: defence and criminal liability with regard to mental disorders, personality disorders, suicide; sexual offences and substance abuse.

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  • Module content:

    Due to the multidisciplinary, concurring and co-ordinating nature of criminalistics, the subject cannot be regarded as a separate discipline with its own unique methods and techniques. Criminalistics involve an integrated process that includes the following
    • identification of criminal actions and the persons involved in it, whether dead or
      alive;
    • fieldwork methods and techniques of the criminal investigator; and
    • laboratory analyses carried out during the investigation process.

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  • Module content:

    The culture of materialism and financial success that currently prevail in South Africa gives rise to an increasing number of economic related crimes being committed. These offences and more specifically the characteristics, causes, cost and various types of economic crimes will receive attention in this module. Considering that a large number of offenders employ their skills within group context to obtain political power, organised crime is regarded as an important component of this module. The structure, characteristics and forms assumed by organised crime activities are addressed. In addition, some of the economic crimes that are committed exclusively for their economic benefits are also studied.

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  • Module content:

    A criminological approach to the interaction between police, courts and the Department of Correctional Services. During this module, a community outreach project is also undertaken in collaboration with the police focusing on crime prevention in a specific geographical area.

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  • Module content:

    Independent research based on a relevant topic; the completed research process will be presented in a research report.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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