Yearbooks

Programme: BPhysio

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
10138103 Faculty of Health Sciences Minimum duration of study: 4 years Total credits: 420
Contact:
Prof DJ Mothabeng
[email protected]
+27 (0)123563233

Programme information

A revised curriculum is being phased in for the programme. The revised first year of study will be followed for the first time in 2015, the second year in 2016, the third year in 2017 and the fourth year in 2018.

The programme extends over four academic years, during which period a student receives clinical training as a student physiotherapist at an institution approved by the University.

Students may be allowed to extend the first two years of study over three years, in which case the modules per year must be selected in consultation with the head of department at the commencement of studies.

Admission requirements

  • The following persons will be considered for admission: a candidate who is in possession of a certificate that is deemed by the University to be equivalent to the required Grade 12 certificate with university endorsement; a candidate who is a graduate from another tertiary institution or has been granted the status of a graduate of such an institution; a candidate who is a graduate of another faculty at the University of Pretoria; and a candidate who is currently in university.
  • Life Orientation is excluded in the calculation of the APS.
  • Grade 11 final examination results, the NBT results as well as a Value-added Questionnaire will be used for the conditional admission of prospective students.
  • Admission to Health Sciences programmes is subject to a selection process.
  • The applications of international candidates who come from countries that have medical schools will not be considered for placement in the MBChB programme except where intergovernmental agreements are in place.
  • For selection purposes the sum of the results in six subjects, including English, Mathematics and Physical Science, is calculated.
  • Candidates, please note that your APS may not drop with more than two points in your final school examination results in order to maintain your provisional admission.
  • PLEASE NOTE that compliance with the minimum admission requirements does not necessarily guarantee admission to any programme in this Faculty.
  • Selection queries may be directed to [email protected]

Minimum requirements 

Achievement level

APS

English

Mathematics

Physical Science

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

4

3

D

D

4

3

D

D

4

3

D

D

30

Additional requirements

Also consult the General Regulations.

Notes:

  1. For students who registered for the BPhysT degree programme prior to 2015, the relevant regulations as they appear in the 2014 Yearbook will apply.
  2. Each student in Physiotherapy must apply to the Registrar of the Health Professions Council of South Africa for registration as a student in Physiotherapy immediately after admission to the first year of study.

Other programme-specific information

First year of study
Practical nursing
Practical nursing for a continual period of 40 hours must be completed satisfactorily at an approved hospital/facility after the conclusion of the examination period in November. Documentary proof to this effect must be submitted.
Subminimum
A subminimum of 40% is required in the theoretical as well as in the practical examination in FTP 100.

Second year of study
Basic Emergency Care (Code GNK 286)

  • If students obtain 60% or more in Basic Emergency Care, this mark will be validated as the examination mark at the end of the year, and such students will be exempted from the examination in the module.
  • Students who obtain between 40% and 49% in the calculated mark for the module, will be admitted to a second examination in November/ December of the same year, or in January of the following year. A minimum of 50% is required as a pass mark for the second examination.
  • This examination will also serve as an aegrotat or extraordinary examination for students who could not write the initial examination due to health or other acceptable reasons. A student must, however, apply formally to be admitted to such an examination, and the application must be approved by the Dean, on the recommendation of the head of department, and in some cases, also by the Faculty Health Committee.

Subminimum
A subminimum of 40% is required in the theoretical and practical components in the examination in FTP 220 and 203 and in POL 251 IHL 210

Third year of study
Subminimum
A subminimum of 40% is required in the theoretical and practical/clinical examination in (FTP) Physiotherapy 300, (FTP) Physiotherapy clinical practice 301 and (POL) Professional development and leadership 300.

Fourth year of study
Subminimum
A subminimum of 40% is required in clinical/practical as well as theoretical components of the examination of (FTP 400,402) Physiotherapy 400 and 402 and (IHL 414, 424) Integrated healthcare leadership 414, 424.

Exemption from the examination in (ANP) Anatomical Pathology 210
Exemption from the examination may be granted if a student who obtained a module mark of at least 60%, exercises the option to accept it as the final mark.

Exemption from the examination in (FAR) Pharmacology 381, 382
Exemption from the examination can be granted if a student who obtained a module mark of at least 60%, exercises the option to accept it as the final mark.

Examinations and pass requirements

Students who fail a year in the existing curriculum will be managed on an individual basis in the Department of Physiotherapy.

Special examination: Fourth year of study

  1. The student gets another opportunity to take part in the examination.
  2. A special examination in (FTP 400) Physiotherapy 400, (FTP 402) Physiotherapy clinical practice 402 and (IHL 414, 424) Integrated healthcare leadership 414, 424, is conducted after six months have elapsed since the examination in which the student failed. If the student failed in (FTP 402) Physiotherapy clinical practice 402, he or she must undergo further clinical instruction in the clinical training areas and obtain at least 50% in the examination.
  3. A student who has not obtained a pass mark in the research report of RHC 400, Research in healthcare sciences 400, must submit an amended research report at a later date determined by the head of department.

Ancillary examination: Fourth year of study
After the conclusion of the examination in (FTP 400) Physiotherapy 400 and (FTP 402) Physiotherapy clinical practice 402 and before the results are announced, the examiners may, with a view to awarding a final mark, summon a student for an ancillary examination in the theory and/or clinical component of (FTP 400) Physiotherapy 400 and (FTP 402) Physiotherapy clinical practice 402.
 

  • In accordance with the stipulations of the General Regulations, no minimum year or semester mark is needed for admission to the examination, and all registered students are admitted to the examination automatically.
  • The final mark for a specific module in Nursing Science, Physiotherapy, Radiography, Occupational Therapy and Human Nutrition (at least 50% is required to pass) is calculated from the examination mark as well as the mark compiled from the evaluation of a student during continuous, objective and controlled assessment opportunities during the course of the quarter/semester/year. At least one formal assessment per module is set as the minimum norm, and students will be exposed on a continuous and regular basis to self-directed assignments in order to promote reflective learning.
  • In the case of modules with practical components, students are required to also comply with the applicable attendance requirements with regard to acquiring practical skills before a pass mark can be obtained for the module.
  • There are two main examination opportunities per annum, the first and second examination. In respect of first-semester modules, the first examination opportunity is in May/June and the second examination opportunity in July. In respect of second-semester modules, the first examination opportunity is in October/ November and the second examination opportunity in November/December of the same year. Where students need to work additional clinical hours to be allowed to do a second examination, the Head of Department will determine the second examination opportunity.
  • Only two examination opportunities per module are allowed. If a student fails a module at the second examination opportunity, the module must be repeated.
  • A second examination opportunity in a module is granted to students in the following cases:

- If a student obtains a final mark of less than 50% in the relevant module at the first examination opportunity and thus fails.

- If a student does not obtain the subminimum in the examination, as required for a specific module.

- If a student does not sit the examination in a module at the first examination opportunity due to illness or extraordinary circumstances.

  • Students intending to sit the second examination due to the reasons mentioned above, must register for the second examination opportunity 24 hours after the results have been made public.
  • If a student fails a module at the first examination opportunity, the examination mark obtained in the relevant module at the second examination opportunity will be calculated as the final mark. The marks obtained with continuous evaluation during the course of the quarter/semester/year will not be taken into calculation. If the student passes the module at the second examination opportunity, a maximum of 50% is awarded as a pass mark to the module in question.
  • If a student could not sit the examination in a module at the first examination opportunity due to illness or extraordinary circumstances, the continuous evaluation mark, together with the examination mark obtained in the module in question at the second examination opportunity, will be calculated as the final mark obtained in the module.
  • The School of Healthcare Sciences applies the General Regulations, according to which a student requiring a limited number of modules to complete his or her degree, may in terms of faculty regulations, be admitted to a special examination in the modules in question.

Promotion to next study year

Selected first-year students who have passed in sufficient first-semester modules at 100 level will, according to the stipulations of the General Regulations, automatically be admitted to the second semester of the first year of study. During the second semester, students may follow the outstanding module(s) on an anti-semester basis and write the examination, on the condition that the modules in question are indeed presented on an anti-semester basis in the second semester by the relevant department and can be accommodated in the class and examination timetables.

Modules/subjects with practical and clinical training credits cannot be passed, unless all prescribed clinical hours and practical skills have been completed to the satisfaction of the head of department.

  • A student must pass in all the prescribed core modules of a specific year of study to be promoted to a subsequent year of study. A student can only be promoted to a subsequent year of study if the student has not failed more than two fundamental modules of seven weeks each per semester or one module of 14 weeks per semester. A non-negotiable prerequisite for admission to the final year of study is pass marks in all the core and fundamental modules of the preceding years of study. Refer to the programmes for fundamental modules in each discipline.
  • A pass mark refers to a final mark of at least 50%.
  • Modules with practical and clinical training credits cannot be passed unless all the prescribed clinical hours and practical activities have been completed to the satisfaction of the head of department.
  • The Chairperson of the examination moderating meeting may, after assessing the student’s total profile, grant special approval to be promoted to the next year of study.
  • The exception is the Department of Human Nutrition, where the regulations as applicable in the Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences regarding the modules presented by that Faculty, are relevant.
  • Modules can only be taken in advance or repeated if it can be accommodated in the existing examination timetable.
  • A student who must repeat a year of study may, with the approval of the Chairperson of the examination moderating meeting and the head of department concerned, be allowed to take fundamental modules of the subsequent year, if he/she complies with all the prerequisites for the relevant modules. No adjustment to existing timetables will be allowed.

The following fundamental modules are relevant:

  • Department of Nursing Science: SLK 110, 120; FSG 251,252
  • Department of Physiotherapy: SOH 254; FSG 251, 252, 261, 262; SLK 210, ANP 210; GMB 252, 253, 254; FAR 381, 382
  • Department of Occupational Therapy: ZUL 110; SEP 110; SLK 210, 220; FSG 251, 252, 261, 262; ANP 210; RPD 481, GNK 286
  • Department of Human Nutrition: FLG 211, 212, 221, 222; BCM 251, 252, 261, 262; FAR 381, 382, VDS 322; VDB 321
  • Department of Radiography: FSG 251, 252, 262; GNK 286; ANP 210.

Pass with distinction

The degree is conferred with distinction on a student who has obtained at least 75% in (FTP 400) Physiotherapy 400 and (FTP 402) Physiotherapy clinical practice 402 and a joint average of at least 75% in (RHC 400) Research in healthcare sciences 400 and (IHL 414, 424) Integrated healthcare leadership 414, 424.

Minimum credits: 140

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    Find, evaluate, process, manage and present information resources for academic purposes using appropriate technology.

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  • Module content:

    Apply effective search strategies in different technological environments. Demonstrate the ethical and fair use of information resources. Integrate 21st-century communications into the management of academic information.

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  • Module content:

    A systematic approach to Anatomy, including general terminology, embryology and osteology, with the use of wet specimens. Introductory histology includes cytology, the nucleus and cell division, epithelial tissue, general connective tissue, cartilage and bone.

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  • Module content:

    Anatomy of the appendicular skeleton
    A systematic approach to the Anatomy of the muscles, blood vessels, nerve supply, lymph drainage and joints of the upper and lower limbs, as well as surface anatomy, with the use of wet specimens. Introductory histology includes muscle tissue, nerve tissue, and blood and haemopoietic tissue.

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  • Module content:

    A systematic approach to the anatomy of the thorax and its contents, the abdomen and its contents and the pelvis and its contents (organs, vascular systems, nerve supply, lymph drainage, muscles and joints), as well as surface anatomy, with the use of wet specimens. Introductory histology includes the histology of the lungs, liver and kidneys.

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  • Module content:

    Anatomy of the head and neck, and neuroanatomy
    A systematic approach to the anatomy of the head and neck regions, the senses and the central and peripheral nervous system (cranial nerves, autonomic nervous system), as well as surface anatomy, with the use of wet specimens.

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  • Module content:

    Theory: Introduction to general chemistry: Measurement in chemistry, matter and energy, atomic theory and the periodic table, chemical compounds and chemical bonds; quantitative relationships in chemical reactions, states of matter and the kinetic theory; solutions and colloids, acids, bases and ionic compounds, chemical equilibria. Introduction to organic chemistry: Chemical bonding in organic compounds, nature, physical properties and nomenclature of simple organic molecules, isomerism, chemical properties of alkanes and cycloalkanes, alkenes, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and esters, amines and amides, carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids.
    Practicals.

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  • Module content:

    Academic reading as well as academic writing and presentation skills, based on the approach followed in the healthcare sciences. *Presented to students in Health Sciences only.

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  • Module content:

    Study of specific language skills required in the Health Care Sciences, including interviewing and report-writing skills. *Presented to students in Health Sciences only.   (BCur, BDietetics, BOH, BOT, Brad, BPhysT)*

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to physiological principles; neurophysiology, and muscle physiology.

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  • Module content:

    Body fluids; haematology; cardiovascular physiology, lymphatic system, and body defence mechanisms.

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  • Module content:

    Units, vectors, one dimensional kinematics, dynamics, work, equilibrium, sound, liquids, heat, thermodynamic processes, electric potential and capacitance, direct current and alternating current, optics, modern physics, radio activity.

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  • Module content:

    *For absolute beginners only.
    *Only students from the School of Healthcare Sciences may take this module during semester 2. All other students must  take this module during semester 1. Also note that students from the School of Healthcare Sciences, who already possess the language skills taught in this module, may write an exemption examination.
    The acquisition of basic Sepedi communicative skills with emphasis on everyday expressions and suitable high frequency vocabulary, within specific social situations.

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  • Module content:

    This module is a general orientation to Psychology. An introduction is given to various theoretical approaches in Psychology, and the development of Psychology as a science is discussed. Selected themes from everyday life are explored and integrated with psychological principles. This module focuses on major personality theories. An introduction is given to various paradigmatic approaches in Psychology.

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  • Module content:

    *For absolute beginners only
    *Only students from the School of Healthcare Sciences may take this module during semester 2. All other students must take this module during semester 1. Students from the School of Healthcare Sciences, who already possess the language skills taught in this module, may write an exemption examination.
    The acquisition of basic isiZulu communicative skills with emphasis on everyday expressions and suitable high frequency vocabulary, within specific situations.

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    General introduction and orientation to physiotherapy, PBL skills and evidence-based approach to physiotherapy. Introduction to biomechanics, terminology, passive movements, measurement of the range of movement, clinical visits and patient-handling.
    Kinetics: axis, planes, levers, effect of gravity on the human body.
    Applied electro biomechanics: introduction to radiation, high-frequency, ultrasound, shortwave diathermy, laser, ultraviolet, infrared radiation.
    Introduction to manual therapy: general introduction to massaging, evaluation of soft tissue, types applications and effects of massage techniques on various types of tissue, modalities application to the human body.
    Human movement science: introduction to biomechanics, study of human movement, functional evaluation, muscle-testing, types of muscular activity, kinematics: analysis of movement, motor control and posture, characteristics of normal movement. Applied electrobiomechanics, introduction to medium frequency currents, Russian currents. Pulmonology.
    Note: Physiotherapy is presented in a problem-based and integrated manner.

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  • Module content:

    Leadership and multidisciplinary team work. Healthcare systems and legislation. Determinants of health. Introduction to healthcare models (e.g. community-based care, family-centred care, etc.). Professionalism, Ethical principles. Management of diversity. NB: Only for School of Healthcare Sciences and Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology students.

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Minimum credits: 128

Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    The problem-based learning approach to the principles of human movement science manual therapy for soft tissue and electro-biomechanics.  This approach is applied by using selected clinical conditions of the thorax, pelvis and hip-joint over the total life spectrum.
    The problem-based approach to the treatment of selected clinical conditions of the knee, ankle and foot complex, the pectoral girdle and gleno-humeral joint, the elbow, forearm and wrist and hand complex over the total life-cycle, through the application of the principles of human movement science manual therapy for soft tissue and electro-biomechanic.

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  • Module content:

    Study of the epidemiology, prevalence and incidence of selected clinical conditions. Students acquire clinical experience through the treatment of selected clinical conditions in various health care institutions, practices and clinics.
    A theoretical and clinical examination will take place after conclusion of the module.

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  • Module content:

    Principles of project management. Communication principles. Leadership.  Health promotion and education, advocacy and literacy. Counselling for health behaviour change. NB: Only for School of Healthcare Sciences and Speech- Language Pathology and Audiology students.

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Minimum credits: 147

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    Introduction, receptors, antagonism, kinetic principles, drugs that impact upon the autonomic and central nervous system, pharmacotherapy of hypertension, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, heart failure, arrhythmias, and epilepsy. Diuretics, glucocorticosteroids, local anaesthetics, anaesthetic drugs, analgesics, iron and vitamins, oncostatics and immuno suppressants.

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  • Module content:

    Hormones, drugs that act on the histaminergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic receptors. Pharmacotherapy of diabetes mellitus, schizophrenia, depression, obesity, anxiety, insomnia, gastro-intestinal diseases. Anticoagulants, antimicrobial drugs.

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  • Module content:

    Community needs assessment. Leadership in community development. Planning and implementation of collaborative community-based interventions. Application of principles of monitoring and evaluation. NB: Only for School of Healthcare Sciences and Department of Speech - Language Pathology and Audiology students.

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  • Module content:

    End-of-life care; preventing and managing sexual harassment; giving and receiving feedback; self and time-management; reflexive caring; practice; the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF); working with mid-level workers; leadership management and evidence-based practice; ethics in physiotherapy practice; medico-legal documentation.

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  • Module content:

    Concepts of research; research process; research studies appraisal; planning and developing literature review; developing research idea and research question; research principles in designing research proposal; research proposal writing

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    Theory of comprehensive physiotherapeutic management (prevention, promotion, restoration, and rehabilitation) of notifiable, non-notifiable and infectious conditions.
    Diseases of lifestyle, chronic disease, the impact of HIV on disability and on patients with trauma, mental health. Impact of physical/economic/political/
    psychosocial environment on health and well-being, health promotion and development and sports science.
    Comprehensive physiotherapy management is applied to infant health, during childhood, adolescent health, women's and men's health, health and disease in middle age and geriatrics.

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  • Module content:

    Comprehensive clinical management of patients with communicable and non-communicable diseases and conditions, patients with an impairment or disability as a result of the impact of physical/economic/political and psychosocial environment on health and well-being, health promotion, and development and sports science. Comprehensive clinical management is applied where relevant on infant health, during childhood, adolescence, in women's and men's health, and health and disease in middle age and geriatrics, diseases of lifestyle, chronic disease, impact of HIV on disability, victims of trauma, and/or a mental health condition.

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  • Module content:

    Community needs assessment. Leadership in community development. Planning and implementation of collaborative community-based interventions. Application of principles of monitoring and evaluation. NB: Only for School of Healthcare Sciences and Department of Speech - Language Pathology and Audiology students.

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  • Module content:

    Ethical management of community physiotherapy programmes, including physiotherapy aspects of community-based primary care. Sustained professional development, private practice management and labour law.

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Minimum credits: 113

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Advanced comprehensive physiotherapeutic management of communicable and non-communicable diseases and conditions. This includes diseases of lifestyle, chronic disease, impact of HIV on disability, victims of trauma, and mental health. Impact of physical/economic/political/psychosocial environment of health and well-being, health promotion and development, and sport science. The comprehensive physiotherapeutic management is applied to patients of all ages where relevant: in infant health, childhood, adolescent health, women's and men’s health, health and disease in middle age and geriatrics and is based on the epidemiology of disease. The module includes 800 hours clinical experience in a variety of health care scenarios.
    Examination period: October/November.

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  • Module content:

    Comprehensive clinical management of patients with communicable, non-communicable diseases and conditions, patients who have an impairment or disability due to the impact of physical/economic/political/psychosocial environment on health and well-being. Health promotion, and development and sport science. Comprehensive clinical management is applied where relevant to infant health, during childhood, adolescence, in women's health and men’s health, and health and disease in middle age and geriatrics, diseases of lifestyle, chronic disease, impact of HIV on disability, victims of trauma, and/or a mental health condition, addressing the determinants of health over the total life span. The module includes 800 hours clinical experience in a variety of health care scenarios. Examination period: October/November.

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  • Module content:

    Ethical management of community physiotherapy programmes, including physiotherapy aspects of community-orientated primary health care. Continuing professional development, private practice management and labour law.

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  • Module content:

    Ethical management of community physiotherapy programmes, including physiotherapy aspects of community-based primary care. Sustained professional development, private practice management and labour law.

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  • Module content:

    Conducting process of obtaining ethics clearance, data collection, data analysis, research report writing.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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