Yearbooks

Programme: MCom Industrial Psychology (Coursework)

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
07250144 Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences Minimum duration of study: 1 year Total credits: 180
Contact:
Mrs C Smit
[email protected]
+27 (0)124203108

Admission requirements

  • BCom Honours degree in Human Resource Management or Industrial and Organisational Psychology passed with an average of at least 65%.
  • Psychometrics or equivalent at Honours level.
  • Student numbers are limited. 
  • The head of department may set additional admission requirements. 
  • The number of students will be determined in line with the growth strategy of the University of Pretoria as approved by the Executive. 
  • Allowance will be made for the diversity profile of students.

Examinations and pass requirements

The pass mark for both a dissertation and a mini-dissertation is 50%. The provisions regarding pass requirements for dissertations, contained in General Regulation G.12.2, apply mutatis mutandis to mini-dissertations. A pass mark of at least 50% is required in the examination of each module.

Research information

The mini-dissertation contributes 50% toward the total requirements for the degree.

Dissertations/mini-dissertations, curricula and modules

  1. The degree programme requires that a dissertation/mini-dissertation must be submitted in a field of study chosen from the fields covered for the honours degree, provided that the Dean may, on the recommendation of the head of department/Postgraduate Committee concerned, approve the replacement of the required dissertation by the successful completion of a prescribed number of module credits and a mini-dissertation/research article.
  2. Information on modules, credits and syllabi is available, on request, from the head of department/Postgraduate Committee concerned.
  3. A module in Research Methodology is compulsory in all programmes. The Dean may, on the recommendation of the head of department/Postgraduate Committee concerned, waive the prerequisites.
  4. Sufficient number of bound copies of the dissertation/mini-dissertation must be submitted to the Head: Student Administration for examination, after permission is granted by the supervisor.

Article for publication
A dean may require, before or on submission of a dissertation/mini-dissertation, the submission of a draft article for publication to the supervisor. The draft article should be based on the research that the student has conducted for the dissertation/mini-dissertation and be approved by the supervisor concerned. The supervisor should then have the opportunity to take the paper through all the processes of revision and resubmission as may be necessary and/or appropriate in order to achieve publication.

Submission of dissertation/mini-dissertation
A dissertation/mini-dissertation is submitted to the Head: Student Administration/Departmental Postgraduate Office, before the closing date for the various graduation ceremonies as announced annually.

For examination purposes, a student must, in consultation with the supervisor, submit a sufficient number of bound copies and/or e-copies of the dissertation/mini-dissertation, printed on good quality paper and of good letter quality, to the Head: Student Administration/Departmental Postgraduate Office. Permission to submit the dissertation/mini-dissertation in unbound form may be obtained from the supervisor concerned on condition that a copy of the final approved dissertation/mini-dissertation is presented to the examiners in bound format or electronic format.

In addition to the copies already mentioned, each successful student must submit a bound paper copy as well as two electronic copies of the approved dissertation/mini-dissertation to the Head: Student Administration/Departmental Postgraduate Office in the format specified by the faculty and in accordance with the minimum standards set by the Department of Library Services, before 15 February for the Autumn graduation ceremonies and before 15 July for the Spring graduation ceremonies, failing which the degree will only be conferred during a subsequent series of graduation ceremonies.

Minimum credits: 180

Core modules

  • Module content:

    • Developing the background to a research problem, and developing a problem statement and propositions and hypotheses relevant to their study.
    • Compiling a thorough literature review of the topics they intend to study.
    • Approaches to research: An overview of the different approaches to research (qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods) and the philosophical approaches that underpin them (positivism, post-positivism, interpretivism, constructivism, critical theory and pragmatism).  
    • Different research designs in quantitative and qualitative methods, and appropriate sampling approaches for the different research designs.
    • Qualitative research methodology: An overview of qualitative methods for organisational research. An overview of the different methodologies on a continuum between modernistic qualitative and post-modernistic qualitative research.  
    • Quantitative research methodology

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  • Module content:

    After completing this module, students should be able to:

    • Define IOP and describe the work of an IOP.
    • Distinguish between the different roles and practices of IOP.
    • Identify key critical competencies required to be an effective IOP.
    • Conceptualise a broad theoretical framework for how an IOP operates.
    • Understand and explain the meaning of ethical work behaviour, ethical choice, and morality.
    • Understand and explain the ethical role of the IOP in the workplace.
    • Understand and explain ethical organisational issues and ways to establish ethical work conduct in the workplace.
    • Understand and explain the role of SIOPSA and the HPCSA in governing the ethical conduct of IOPs.

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  • Module content:

    First, this module requires students to come to grips with the basic building blocks of the field of Cross-cultural Psychology. This is done by reviewing the relevant literature to develop an understanding of different kinds of theories and models in Cross-cultural Psychology. Second, students are required to build their own conceptual/mental models in the different areas of Cross-cultural Psychology and to have a thorough understanding of the nature and dynamics of Cross-cultural Psychology in the work context. Thirdly the module requires students to integrate  contextualised theory and models of Cross-cultural Psychology and how they relate to the world of work.

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  • Module content:

    Students develop a conceptual and theoretical insight of AC practice by exploring the available scientific literature on AC. They need to know the guidelines that regulate AC practice (locally and internationally) and must have a good understanding of their implementation in the work context.  Students also have to develop a practical AC for the work context where they apply AC theory and models, including the mixed-method design and trait activation theory, and have to develop their own competency model for a position, matrix grid and AC exercise. Finally, they must demonstrate how they understand the nuts and bolts of AC techniques and the practical application of the AC in an organisation.

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  • Module content:

    The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to:

    • understand and critically evaluate the main leadership theories and to link this knowledge to leadership development requirements in the current world of work;
    • identify and understand the genealogy of leadership development and different models, approaches and techniques for developing leaders and leadership capacity in organisations as well as the role of HR in structuring a leadership development strategy in an organisation;
    • understand how to assess characteristics of individuals or other inherent characteristics that define a leader by exploring the role of intelligence, personality, attributes and even the dark side of leadership or destructive leadership; and  
    • interrogate gender and cultural influences on leadership behaviour and their implications for leadership development.  interrogate gender and cultural influences on leadership behaviour and their implications for leadership development.

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  • Module content:

    Students should be able to play a strategic partnership role in supporting and enabling an organisation’s business strategies by:

    • identifying  organisational strategic human resource challenges;
    • participating in strategic human resource management planning, aligned with an organisational business plan;
    • advising on and solving strategic human resource management issues through constructive decision-making; and
    • implementing SHRM interventions that add value to business

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  • Module content:

    Students are required to study the theory behind change dynamics and to create a practical and applicable framework in order to:

    • understand the 'changing world' from a systems perspective;
    • develop insight into the changes that occur within individuals and organisations;
    • motivate the necessity to understand planned change within organisations; and
    • gain insight into the dynamics, emotions and experiences, and drivers of change
    • Having fulfilled the above requirements, students will be able to:
    • fundamentally understand change and change dynamics;
    • evaluate change interventions in organisations; and
    • lead change interventions in an organisation.

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  • Module content:

    • Approaches to research
    • Qualitative research
    • Special types of research studies
         Evaluation research
         Instrument research
         Questionnaire development
         Programme development
         Quantitative data analysis

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  • Module content:

    After completing this module, students should be able to: 

    • design, conduct and evaluate research in the area of talent management with the aim of utilising human potential and optimising human capital in the workplace; 
    • facilitate and monitor the implementation of talent management practices; and
    • combine theoretical knowledge with practical examples.  
    • Expert knowledge of these themes will also empower students to contribute to the psychological wellbeing of employees, the quality of their work life and positive work behaviour.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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