Yearbooks

Programme: BSocSci Heritage and Cultural Tourism

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
01130068 Faculty of Humanities Minimum duration of study: 3 years Total credits: 366
Contact:
Miss C Herselman
[email protected]
+27 (0)124205956
Prof CC Boonzaaier
[email protected]
+27 (0)124202597

Programme information

This programme focuses on tourism as one of South Africa’s largest and fastest growing industries. Students are trained to play an important role in tourism, especially as far as heritage and cultural tourism is concerned. Graduates can follow careers as tour guides, tour operators (entrepreneurs), heritage resource managers, and publicity agents.

Admission requirements

  • The following persons will be considered for admission: a candidate who is in possession of a certificate that is deemed by the University to be equivalent to the required Grade 12 certificate with university endorsement; a candidate who is a graduate from another tertiary institution or has been granted the status of a graduate of such an institution; and a candidate who is a graduate of another faculty at the University of Pretoria.
  • Candidates who comply with the minimum subject requirements and achievement levels as well as the APS requirements of these programmes will be granted placement in the programmes, subject to the availability of space. The abovementioned is not applicable to selection programmes.
  • To retain admission, learners will be expected to obtain an APS of at least 28 in Grade 12. Prospective students who have already been granted provisional admission in these programmes, but obtained at least an APS of 26 or 27 in Grade 12, will be considered by the Admission Committee should space be available. The Admission Committee of the Faculty of Humanities will consider these students once the results of the National Benchmark Test (NBT) are available and depending on the availability of space.
  • The Faculty will assess satisfactory performance in the NBT in the light of its commitment to ensure that an appropriate proportion of the applicants will be drawn from the disadvantaged category of the population.
  • Applicants who meet the minimum APS requirement, but who do not comply with the subject requirements must write the NBT.
  • Life Orientation is excluded when calculating the APS.

Minimum requirements 

Achievement level

APS

Afrikaans or English

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

5

3

C

C

30

Other programme-specific information

Students who are deemed to be at risk of their level of academic literacy are compelled to take ALL 110 and ALL 125.

Students who are deemed NOT to be at risk of their level of academic literacy are compelled to take language modules to the value of 12 credits from the list of language modules (see Academic literacy).

Elective modules in the first year:
Select any three of the undermentioned disciplines and do two semesters or four quarters from each of these disciplines. If you select an elective discipline for which particular modules are prescribed as core modules, you must select enough other elective modules to obtain the required number of credits.

Elective modules in the second year:
Select any one of the three disciplines that you did at the first-year level and do two semesters or four quarters from that discipline.

Elective modules in the third year:
Take two semesters or four quarters from the discipline that you did at second-year level.

List of elective modules:
Archaeology: AGL 120 [12] AGL 210,220 [20 each] AGL 310,320 [30 each]
Anthropology: APL 110,120 [12 each] APL 210,220 [20 each], APL 310,320 [30 each]
History: GES 110 [12] GES 210,220 [20 each] GES 310,320 [30 each]
Geography: ENV 101, GGY 156 [6 each] GGY 166 [8] GGY 252,266, [12 each], ENV 301, GGY 356,361,366 [18 each] GGY 363 [12]
Geoinformatics: GIS 221 [12]
Meteorology: WKD 164 [8]
Visual culture studies: VKK 111,121 [12 each] VKK 211,221 [20 each] VKK 311,321 [30 each]
Language: See Language groups

LANGUAGE GROUPS FOR SELECTION IN PROGRAMMES

Note: You should consult the alphabetical list of modules for full information on all the language modules listed below, as some of these modules have specific requirements/prerequisites.

Module group 1 – Afrikaans
Year level 1
• As a first language: AFR 110,120
• For speakers of other languages (also for speakers of other languages who are registered for qualifications in education and law) AFR 114
• For law students (first language): AFR 110 Note: AFR 120 may be taken additionally.
• For students following a programme in education: AFR 110,120; (first language); AFR 114 (speakers of other languages)

Year level 2
• As a first language: AFR 214, AFR 210,220
• For students following a programme in education: AFR 214, AFR 220
• Language, culture, communication and media: LCC 220

Year level 3
• As a first language: AFR 311,321
• For students following a programme in education: Any modules with alpha codes AFR and LCC offered at year level 3.
• Language, culture, communication and media: LCC 312,320,322

Module group 2 – English
Year level 1
• For special purposes: ENG 118
• For academic purposes: ENG 110,120

Year level 2
ENG 210,220

Year level 3
• ENG 310,320
• ENG 311,322

Module group 3 – French
Year level 1
• For beginners: FRN 104,181 (LLM students)
• Cultural-professional (for students who have passed French in Grade 12): FRN 113,123

Year level 2
FRN 211,221

Year level 3
Cultural-professional: FRN 361,362,363,364

Module group 4 – German
Year level 1
• For beginners: DTS 104
• Cultural-professional (for students who have passed German in Grade 12): DTS 113,123

Year level 2
DTS 211,221

Year level 3
Cultural-professional: DTS 361,362,363,364

Module group 5 – Greek
Year level 1
GRK 110,120

Year level 2
GRK 210,220

Module group 6 – Hebrew
Year level 1
HEB 110,120

Year level 2
HEB 210,220

Module group 7 – Latin
Year level 1
LAT 110,120 (students who passed Latin in Grade 12 may start immediately with Latin at year level 2)

Year level 2
LAT 210,220

Year level 3
LAT 310,320

Module group 8 – IsiNdebele
Year level 1
For speakers of isiNdebele as home language or first or second additional language
NDE 110, AFT 121

Year level 2
NDE 210, AFT 220

Year level 3
NDE 310, AFT 320

Module group 9 – IsiZulu
Year level 1
• For beginners: ZUL 110,120
• For speakers of isiZulu as home language or first or second additional language: ZUL 111, AFT 121

Year level 2
• For students who did ZUL 110,120 at year level 1: ZUL 210,220
• For students who did AFT 121: ZUL 111 at year level 1: AFT 220, ZUL 211

Year level 3
ZUL 310, AFT 320

Module group 10 – Sepedi
Year level 1
• For beginners: SEP 110,120
• For speakers of Sepedi as home language or first or second additional language: SEP 111, AFT 121

Year level 2
• For students who did SEP 110,120 at year level 1: SEP 210,220
• For students who did AFT 121, SEP 111 at year level 1: AFT 220, SEP 211

Year level 3
SEP 310, AFT 320

Module group 11 – Setswana
Year level 1
• For beginners: STW 110,120
• For speakers of Setswana as home language or first or second additional language: STW 111, AFT 121

Year level 2
• For students who did STW 110,120 at year level 1: STW 210,220
• For students who did AFT 121, STW 111 at year level 1: AFT 220, STW 211

Year level 3
STW 310, AFT 320

Module group 12 – Spanish
Year level 1
For beginners: SPN 101,102

Year level 2
SPN 211,221

Year level 3
SPN 311,321

Module group 13 – Portuguese
Year level 1
• For beginners: PTG 101
• Portuguese language and culture (for students who have passed Portuguese in Gr 12): PTG 113,123

Year level 2
PTG 211,221

Year level 3
PTG 311,321

Academic literacy
The academic literacy of all students who enrol at the University of Pretoria for the first time and all new students enrolling with the Faculty of Humanities for the first time will be assessed at the start of the academic year by means of their NSC marks.

Students following a degree programme : The NSC Grade 12 English mark will be used to determine whether students in the Faculty of Humanities should register for the academic literacy modules (ALL 110 and ALL 125 ):

  • Home Language: Students with a 4 or lower register for ALL 110 and ALL 125.
  • First Additional Language: Students with a 5 or lower register for ALL 110 and ALL 125.

All students in the Faculty of Humanities who are identified as being at risk in terms of their level of academic literacy, are compelled to obtain at least 12 credits in the academic literacy modules ALL 110 and ALL 125.
All students in the Faculty of Humanities who are not at risk in terms of their level of academic literacy, are compelled to obtain at least 12 credits in language modules:

Department of English
ENG 110 Introduction to literature in English (I) 
ENG 120 Introduction to literature in English (II) 
ENG 118 English for specific purposes 

Departement Afrikaans
AFR 110 Afrikaanse taalkunde en letterkunde 
AFR 120 Afrikaanse taalkunde en letterkunde 
AFR 114 Afrikaans vir sprekers van ander tale (I) 

Department of African Languages
NDE 110 Introduction to isiNdebele grammar – Capita selecta 
* Students who want to take isiNdebele in the second semester, should also register for AFT 121 (African languages literature: Capita selecta)
ZUL 110 IsiZulu for beginners 
ZUL 111 Introduction to isiZulu grammar – Capita selecta 
* Students want to take isiZulu in the second semester, should also register for AFT 121 (African languages literature: Capita selecta)
SEP 110 Sepedi for beginners 
SEP 111 Introduction to Sepedi Grammar – Capita selecta
* Students who want to take Sepedi in the second semester, should also register for AFT 121 (African languages literature: Capita selecta)
STW 110 Setswana for beginners
STW 111 Introduction to Setswana Grammar  – Capita selecta
*Students who want to take Setswana in the second semester, should also register for AFT 121 (African languages literature: Capita selecta)

Department of Modern European Languages
DTS 104 German for beginners 
DTS 113 German: Cultural-professional (1) *Prerequisite: Grade 12 German
FRN 104 French for beginners 
FRN 113 French: Cultural-professional (1) *Prerequisite: Grade 12 French
SPN 101 Spanish for beginners 
SPN 102 Spanish for beginners 
PTG 101 Portuguese for beginners

Department of Ancient Languages and Cultures
HEB 110 Hebrew 
LAT 110 Latin 
GRK 110 Greek

Practical/clinical/internship information

In collaboration with the coordinator, the student has to do approved practical work, excursions and applicable short courses before the qualification can be obtained.

Minimum credits: 166

Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    *Optional Field school usually in April
    Introduction to Archaeology
    An introduction as to how archaeologists study the past via the artefacts left behind by our ancestors. Basic introduction to archaeological theory and how it has contributed to interpretation of the past is discussed. Topics range from the origins of the human family in Africa over three million years ago to the study of more recent times.  

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to the study of Heritage and Cultural Tourism; overview of South African resorts and nature conservation areas as tourist destinations within the broader context of heritage and cultural tourism. An introduction to the basic research skills in the HCT domain.

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  • Module content:

    Archaeo-tourism
    Analysis of tourist and other visitations to archaeological sites. Topics cover international and local legislation, ethics and best practices debates on who interprets and who ‘owns’ the past and profits from it.  Also covered are site management plans, condition assessment and a consideration of the politics and ethics of ‘heritage’.  Case studies range from large UNESCO World Heritage Sites to small, almost forgotten ‘places of the past’ scattered across the globe.

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  • Module content:

    Africa and South Africa: a survey
    An overview focusing on the making of African and South African societies from the earliest times to the present with emphasis on the most significant historical forces, factors and events.

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  • Module content:

    Investigating southern African landscapes and placing them in a theoretical and global context. The geomorphological evolution of southern Africa. Introduction to the concepts of Geomorphology and its relationships with other physical sciences (e.g. meteorology, climatology, geology, hydrology and biology). The processes and controls of landform and landscape evolution. Tutorial exercises cover basic techniques of geomorphological analysis, and topical issues in Geomorphology.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to business management as a science; the environment in which the enterprise operates; the field of business, the mission and goals of an enterprise; management and entrepreneurship. Responsible leadership and the role of a business in society. The choice of a form of enterprise; the choice of products and/or services; profit and cost planning for different sizes of operating units; the choice of location; the nature of production processes and the layout of the plant or operating unit.
    Introduction to and overview of general management, especially regarding the five management tasks: strategic management; contemporary developments and management issues; financial management; marketing and public relations. Introduction to and overview of the value chain model; management of the input; management of the purchasing function; management of the transformation process with specific reference to production and operations management; human resources management and information management; corporate governance and black economic empowerment (BEE).

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  • Module content:

    The nature and development of entrepreneurship; the individual entrepreneur and characteristics of South African entrepreneurs. Creativity and innovation, opportunity finding and exploitation. The business plan and resource requirements are explored. Getting started (business start up). Exploring different routes to entrepreneurship: entering a family business, buying a franchise, home-based business and the business buyout. This semester also covers how entrepreneurs can network and find support in their environments. Case studies of successful entrepreneurs - also South African entrepreneurs - are studied.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    African and world archaeology
    Africa is the home of humanity in both a biological and cultural sense and we have the artefacts and sites to prove it. Topics range from the famous 3 million year-old Australopithecine ‘Lucy’ ancestor found in Ethiopia to the ‘Out of Africa’ dispersal of modern humans, and the emergence of human symbolism, rock art and the emergence of complex societies at society at Lake Chad (Daima) and southern Africa (Mapungubwe and Great Zimbabwe). The main aim is to situate events in Africa in global perspective. 

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to Anthropology
    This introduction to anthropology introduces basic themes of the discipline including ritual, religion, marriage and sex.  It combines classic studies with recent scholarship, and asks the 'big question' about human society and human cultures that offer challenging perspectives on the world we live in.

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  • Module content:

    Small places, Large issues
    This module builds on the ethnographic and theoretical themes introduced in APL 110, asking particular questions about how we may think about the relationship between the local and the global; indigenous and universal; public and private; the real and the possible.

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  • Module content:

    Introducing the basic concepts and interrelationships required to understand the complexity of natural environmental problems, physical and human environment, human induced environmental problems, the ways in which the natural environment affects human society and biodiversity, an introduction to major environmental issues in Southern Africa and sustainable development in the context of environmental issues.

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  • Module content:

    The making of the Modern World: a survey
    A selection of themes on Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe and their contribution to the making of the Modern World.

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  • Module content:

    This module begins by fostering an understanding of human geography. Then follows with the political ordering of space; cultural diversity as well as ethnic geography globally and locally; population geography of the world and South Africa: and four economic levels of development. The purpose is to place South Africa in a world setting and to understand the future of the country.

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  • Module content:

    Foundations of visual culture
    This module introduces art and visual culture theory using a wide range of texts and ideas. The module gives students wide exposure to visual discourses and includes a variety of visual culture examples e.g. artworks, advertisements. These discourses may include:  exploring what visual culture is; modes of analysis; introducing terminology such as ideology and myth; dealing with selected periods from history contextually; introducing cultural icons and themes from popular visual culture.

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  • Module content:

    Images across media: current issues
    This module presents an introduction into the ways in which images appear across media in contemporary visual culture from a specific African perspective within the global. This is done by means of exploring key modes, themes, genres, platforms and visual texts. Among the media and mediums that may be covered are photography, art, graphic design, advertising, film, documentaries, video, digital and social media. 

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  • Module content:

    An introduction to the climate and general seasonal climatic circulation patterns of Southern Africa. Basic weather types and weather processes within the Southern African context. Interpretation of synoptic maps and synoptic station reports. Impacts of climate change and extreme climate events on society.
    *BSc (Geography) and BSc (Environmental Sciences) students may register for WKD 155. Students are not allowed to earn credits for both WKD 155 and WKD 164.

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Minimum credits: 80

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Utilisation of SA cultural historical heritage for tourism
    Remembrance and commemoration and its utilisation in the tourism industry. Introduction to the historical-constitutional development of South Africa and inter-group relations in the country in the context of the heritage and tourism sector. An introduction to field research in the HCT domain.

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  • Module content:

    Community-based tourism
    Development theories and tourism theory: relation between development and tourism. Pro-poor tourism: Opportunities for and constraints on tourism development. Case studies in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Southern African Stone Age, Iron Age, Pastoralism, and Historical Archaeology are the main topics discussed. What types of people were making ESA, MSA, and LSA, when did hominids first left Africa, southern African rock art, the origins of livestock herding, the development and decline of complex societies in southern Africa, and postcolonial approaches in archaeology are some of the focus areas.

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  • Module content:

    *Compulsory veld school, usually in September.
    Archaeological field methods and interpretation
    Introduction to the history and application of key field techniques such as research design, field survey, mapping, GPS and GIS, Total Station, compass work, photography, excavation, rock art recording, basic curation of artefacts, data management- and heritage legislation. Practical instruction in artefact cleaning, curation, meta-data capture and exhibition.

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  • Module content:

    Sex, gender and healing
    This module explores sex, sexuality, gender, sickness and healing.  It entails analysing the ways in which these concepts are understood in diverse social contexts and studies how anthropologists think about them in contemporary society.

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  • Module content:

    Power and wealth
    This module explores anthropological perspectives on politics, power and wealth in colonial and postcolonial contexts.  Key concepts that are discussed include anthropological approaches to citizenship, cosmopolitanism, hegemony, human rights, neoliberalism, sovereignty, civil society, gender, race and class.

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  • Module content:

    Themes from African History
    A selection of themes on the history of Africa and its people during pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial times, focusing on the social, political and economic forces that helped shape the African historical experience.

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  • Module content:

    Rise and fall of segregation and apartheid
    Focuses on the origin and theoretical foundations of these policies and their entrenchment in SA legislation. The resistance against the institution of these respective policies and the subsequent dismantling of apartheid. The impact on social, cultural and economic terrain.

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  • Module content:

    Physical processes that influence the earth’s surface and management. Specific processes and their interaction in themes such as weathering; soil erosion; slope, mass movement and fluvial processes. Practical laboratory exercises are based on the themes covered in the module theory component.

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  • Module content:

    An urbanising world. Urban structure and land use. Urban processes. The urban environment. Social structure and change in cities. Living in the city. Economy, society and politics in the city. Third-world cities and South African cities. Urban futures.

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  • Module content:

    *GIS 221 does not lead to admission to any module at 300 level.
    Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), theoretical concepts and applications of GIS. The focus will be on the GIS process of data input, data analysis, data output and associated technologies.This module teaches students to use GIS as a tool.

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  • Module content:

    Gender, sexuality and visual representation
    Introduction to the representation of sex, gender and sexuality in visual culture.  Gender theory and terminology related to feminism, masculinity studies and lbgtq theory (lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgendered, queer) are unpacked. Themes and issues in gender and identity politics such as the male hero, the nude in late 19th century art, the femme fatale, hysteria, androgyny and transsexuality are dealt with. Sexuality and gender issues across a range of visual cultural such as soaps, sitcoms, artworks, advertisements, fashion, music videos and films are addressed.

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  • Module content:

    Visual (Post)colonialisms
    This module investigates aspects of Africanness, Afrocentrism, multiculturalism, transnationalism and the African diaspora and studies a cross section of work including traditional art, tourist art and the hybrid aesthetics of contemporary African art and visual culture. The module also focuses on the ideology of imperialism and colonialism and its influence on art and visual culture from the nineteenth century onwards. The influence of postcolonial thinking on the deconstruction of the ideology of colonialism is highlighted with reference to landscape and memory, the exotic and primitivism in South African visual culture.

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Minimum credits: 120

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Cultural historical sites and activities in SA
    Introduction to the most important cultural historical sites and cultural activities in South Africa, with a specific focus on cultural tourism in practice. A research assignment with particular attention to literature analysis.

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  • Module content:

    Ethno-tourism
    Approaches to the study of cultural landscapes: characteristics of ethno-tourism. The problem of stereotyping in the tourist industry. Influence of tourism on host communities: tourism dependence and residents’ attitudes, authenticity and the presentation and commodification of culture. An assignment with particular attention to qualitative research methods.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    *AGL 310 will be a prerequisite for a number of other modules (eg AGL 751 Advanced archaeological theory) and it is the responsibility of the students intending to continue archaeology to postgraduate level to do this module.

    Nature of archaeological theory; critique of various approaches to archaeological theory, debates over the relevance of theory, are some of the major topics to be presented.

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  • Module content:

    The module focuses on the following topics: designing and managing fieldwork projects; the relationship between commercial practice, academic research, and local communities; management of archaeological collections in repositories and debates on repatriation; ethics; cultural resource management; presentation of archaeological sites; heritage and related legislation, The main aim is to prepare students for post-degree work in both private and public sectors. 

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  • Module content:

    Africa: anthropological perspectives
    Contemporary ethnographic studies in the African continent, with particular reference to politics, war, resettlement and refugees, religion, identity formation and identity politics, ethnicity and class, and consumption.

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  • Module content:

    Fieldwork, ethnography and theory
    This module reviews themes such as conducting fieldwork, writing ethnography and developing theory in anthropology.  The module allows the opportunity to gain experience with ethnographic field methods in order to develop insight into the implications of methodological choices and their relationship to research questions and settings.

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  • Module content:

    The module focuses on contemporary environmental issues in southern Africa. Recent and future impacts of human pressures on natural resources, the state of the environment in South Africa, management of critical resources, population trends, biodiversity loss, pollution, water scarcity, desertification, climate change, waste accumulation and management, environmental management tools, environmental education and environmental management legislation.

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  • Module content:

    Historical trends in the modern world
    A selection of political, economic and social themes.

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  • Module content:

    Globalisation, diversity and change
    Theories and interpretation on the process of change. Globalisation and its significance for, inter alia, the global economy, the nation-state, nationalism, ethnicity and culture.

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  • Module content:

    The module conceptually integrates environmental, economic, and social components of sustainable development. Other topics covered include changing perceptions on development and environment, development paradigms, challenges of sustainable development, actors and actions in sustainable development, rural and urban livelihoods, and a Third World assessment of sustainable development in the developing world.

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  • Module content:

    *Note: The module is available for BSc (Geography) and BSc (Environmental Sciences) students only. The theory content of this module is the same as GGY 363 and students are not allowed to earn credits for both GGY 361 and GGY 363.


    Interactions of geomorphic processes within the physical and built environments; themes such as geomorphology and environmental change, slope processes and the environment, geomorphic risks and hazards, soil erosion and conservation, geomorphology in environmental management, applied weathering. Practicals involve fieldwork including sampling and mapping and subsequent laboratory analysis.

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  • Module content:

    *Note: The content of this module is the same as GGY 361 and students are not allowed to earn credits for both GGY 361 and GGY 363.
    Interactions of geomorphic processes within the physical and built environments; themes such as geomorphology and environmental change, slope processes and the environment, geomorphic risks and hazards, soil erosion and conservation, geomorphology in environmental management, applied weathering.

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  • Module content:

    Classic development frameworks. Spatial development history and legacy in South Africa. Overview of contemporary environmental legislation in South Africa. Rural development strategy. Rural and agricultural reconstruction. Land reform. Urban development and strategy. Urban spatial reconstruction. National spatial development frameworks.

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  • Module content:

    Post/Modernities: Contemporary discourses
    This module investigates Modernism and Postmodernism as the dominant aesthetic, discursive and visual paradigms of the 20th and 21st centuries. Key concepts in these discourses and counter-discourses are highlighted and explored, such as the creation of modern subjectivity, the beautiful and the sublime, the avant garde, the metaphysics of presence, originality, authorship, hermeneutics, the “language turn”, différance and the so-called “end of art”. Theorist may include: Kant, Heidegger, Derrida and Foucault.

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  • Module content:

    Visual and virtual spaces 
    Critical decoding of culturally encoded ideas and ideologies embodied in the construction of space, place, and cyberspace in selected Modernist and Postmodernist cultural practices. Topics include spaces of consumption and entertainment such as shopping malls; gender and spatiality; symbolic spaces; surveillance and the architecture of fear. Land art, environmental art and related debates are also addressed. The ways in which real space is virtualised through new technologies; the history and development of virtual reality, virtual communities, the cyborg and cyberpunk, as well as post humanism, are all engaged with specific emphasis on how embodiment and disembodiment are represented visually.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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