Yearbooks

Programme: BComHons Human Resources Management

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
07240144 Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences Duration of study: 1 year Total credits: 130
Contact:
Mrs C Smit
[email protected]
+27 (0)124203108

Admission requirements

  • BCom degree in Human Resource Management or Industrial and Organisational Psychology accredited by the Health Profession Council of South Africa (HPCSA).
  •  An average of at least 65% for Industrial Psychology on 3rd year level.

1. Registration for a second field of study With reference to General Regulation G.6, a student who has already completed a bachelor of honours degree at this or another university, may, with the permission of the Dean, register for another degree, subject to the regulations applicable to the field of study in question and to any other stipulations the Dean may prescribe on the condition that there shall be no overlap in the course content of the first degree and the second degree. Such a concession may be withdrawn by the Dean/Deans if the student does not perform satisfactorily.

2. Acknowledgement of modules

2.1. Subject to the stipulations of G.22.1, G.23.2 and the Joint Statute, a Dean may acknowledge modules passed at another tertiary institution or at this University in a department other than that in which the honours study is undertaken for the honours degree – provided that at least half of the required modules for the degree in question are attended and passed at this university.

2.2. If there is overlap in the course content of the degree for which the student wishes to enrol or is enrolled and a degree already conferred, the Dean may not acknowledge any modules that form part of the degree already conferred.

 

 

Additional requirements

  1. Registration for a second field of study

With reference to General Regulation G.6, a student who has already completed a bachelor of honours degree at this or another university, may, with the permission of the Dean, register for another degree, subject to the regulations applicable to the field of study in question and to any other stipulations the Dean may prescribe on the condition that there shall be no overlap in the course content of the first degree and the second degree. Such a concession may be withdrawn by the Dean/Deans if the student does not perform satisfactorily.

  1. Acknowledgement of modules
  1. Subject to the stipulations of G.22.1, G.23.2 and the Joint Statute, a Dean may acknowledge modules passed at another tertiary institution or at this University in a department other than that in which the honours study is undertaken for the honours degree – provided that at least half of the required modules for the degree in question are attended and passed at this university.
  2. If there is overlap in the course content of the degree for which the student wishes to enrol or is enrolled and a degree already conferred, the Dean may not acknowledge any modules that form part of the degree already conferred.

Examinations and pass requirements

In calculating marks, General Regulation G12.2 applies.
Subject to the provisions of General Regulation G.26, a head of a department determines, in consultation with the Dean

  • when the honours examinations in his/her department will take place, provided that:
  1. honours examinations which do not take place before the end of the academic  year, must take place no later than 18 January of the following year, and all examination results must be submitted to the Student Administration by 25 January; and
  2. honours examinations which do not take place before the end of the first semester, may take place no later than 15 July, and all examination results must be submitted to the Student Administration on or before 18 July.
  • whether a candidate will be admitted to a supplementary examination, provided that a supplementary examination is granted, only once in a maximum of two prescribed semester modules or once in one year module;
  • supplementary examinations (if granted) cover the same subject matter as was the case for the examinations;
  • NB: For the purpose of this provision, the phrase "not sit for an examination more than twice in the same subject" as it appears in General Regulation G.18.2, implies that a candidate may not be admitted to an examination in a module, including a supplementary examination, more than three times.
  • the manner in which research reports are prepared and examined in his department.

NB: Full details are published in each department's postgraduate information brochure, which is available from the head of department concerned. The minimum pass mark for a research report is 50%. The provisions regarding pass requirements for dissertations contained in General Regulation G.12.2 apply mutatis mutandis to research reports.

Subject to the provisions of General Regulation G.12.2.1.3, the subminimum required in subdivisions of modules is published in the study guides, which is available from the head of department concerned.

Minimum credits: 130

Core modules

  • Module content:

    • Systems approach to labour relations;
    • Contemporary environment variables;
    • Economical;
    • Economic systems and labour relations;
    • RDP initiatives;
    • Foreign and local markets;
    • Creating jobs;
    • Social;
    • RDP principles;
    • Social contracts;
    • Political;
    • Constitution;
    • Affirmative Action;
    • Review of legislation and its current effect on labour relations;
    • Advanced Labour Relations practices;
    • General human resources practices and unfair discrimination;
    • Handling of grievances;
    • Discipline  and
    • Retrenchment.

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  • Module content:

    • Introduction to group dynamics;
    • Leadership and group functioning;
    • Methods of group decision making;
    • Setting of group objectives;
    • Occurrence of conflict and controversy in groups;
    • Coping with conflict of group interests;
    • Group utilisation in problem solving and decision making;
    • Group development and socialisation;
    • Theory regarding negotiations;
    • How to negotiate;
    • The characteristics of the negotiator;
    • Techniques and strategies in negotiating and
    • The negotiation relationship.

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  • Module content:

    • The extent of diversity;
    • Paradigm shifts in the development of the historically disadvantaged employees;
    • Organisation effectiveness by means of management of diversity;
    • Awareness and acceptance of unique and similar characteristics;
    • Female employees; Indian employees; employees with disabilities;homosexual employees; Eurocentric employees; Afrocentric employees;
    • Unique cultural values;
    • Preparing the organisation for diversity management;
    • Phasing in of historically disadvantaged employees in the organisation;
    • Employment Equity legislation;
    • Compiling and maintaining an Employment Equity plan;
    • Maintaining a diversity climate and
    • Monitoring and evaluating the diversity management process.

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  • Module content:

    • Legal aspects: the Health and Safety Act 85 of 1993
    • The concepts “health” and “safety” in context
    • A few important and specific aspects of industrial health
    • Employee Aid Programmes (EAP)
    • HIV/Aids
    • Alcohol and drug dependence
    • Management stress and burnout
    • Traditional healers and employee health
    • International management and employee health
    • Examples of actual events related to employee health and safety

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  • Module content:

    • A model of career management
    • Practical application of the model
    • Career development and adult development stages
    • The choice of, and entry into a career
    • The early career
    • Middle and later stages of career development
    • Job stress
    • Intersection between work and family
    • Entrepreneurship
    • Organisation contributions

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  • Module content:

    • The nature of planned change
    • The competencies of the organisational development practitioner
    • Ethical dilemmas in organisational development
    • Phases in the OD process
    • Entering and contracting
    • Diagnosing organisations
    • Diagnosing groups and jobs
    • Collecting and analysing diagnostic information
    • Feedback of diagnostic data
    • Designing interventions
    • Leading and managing change
    • Evaluating and institutionalising organisation development interventions
    • Human process interventions
    • Interpersonal and group process approaches
    • Organisation process approaches
    • Technostructural interventions
    • Restructuring organisations
    • Employee involvement
    • Work design
    • Strategic interventions
    • Special applications of OD

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  • Module content:

    • Problem identification and problem formulation;
    • Literature study/text study;
    • Research aids: library, computer, etc;
    • Observation and measurement: test reliability; test validity; measuring levels; scaling;
    • Questionnaires as measuring instruments;
    • Random tests;
    • Research strategies;
    • Gathering of data and data preparation;
    • Statistics: parametric and non-parametric;
    • Qualitative methods: contents analysis, phenomenology, ethnomethodology, critical theory and
    • Report writing: research presentation, technical care of research
      reports, scientific journal articles, theses and papers.

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  • Module content:

    • An internship programme (200 hours) for Psychometrists accredited with the Professional Board for Psychology;
    • Ethical and legal aspects regarding psychological measurement;
    • Theory and application of psychological tests;
    • Introduction to tests commonly used in industry and
    • Psychometric report writing.

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  • Module content:

    This module requires the learner to demonstrate their ability to conduct independent research by conducting research on a topic in the Human Resource Management or Industrial Psychology field and writing an academic article for publication in an accredited academic journal.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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