Yearbooks

Programme: BDiv

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
06130005 Faculty of Theology Duration of study: 4 years Total credits: 504

Programme information

This programme provides theological training and formation aimed at the needs of churches. It comprises two aspects, namely a general denominational aspect and a specific denominational aspect. The structure of the programme is determined by a balance between the (1) Biblical scientific dimensions, (2) historical and systematic theology and (3) applied dimensions in the field of theology.

The outcome that the programme aims to achieve, is theoretically supported formation aimed at a broad spectrum of ministerial needs. For this purpose certain elements of the programme are presented in partnership with churches that support the programme.

A student who registers for this programme has to submit his or her curriculum to the Dean for approval at the beginning of each year.

Admission requirements

  • The following persons will be considered for admission: a candidate who is in possession of a certificate that is deemed by the University to be equivalent to the required Grade 12 certificate with university endorsement; a candidate who is a graduate from another tertiary institution or has been granted the status of a graduate of such an institution; and a candidate who is a graduate of another faculty at the University of Pretoria.
  • Life Orientation is excluded in the calculation of the APS.

 

Minimum requirements 

Achievement level

APS

Afrikaans or English

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

4

3

D

D

25

(23-24 admission based on NBT)

 

 

Other programme-specific information

Notes:

  • Academic literacy: The following modules must be completed during the first year of study: ALL 110 (not compulsory if the candidate is exempted on the grounds of the NSC-symbol for English) and ALL 120. All students must pass ALL 120 as part of the prescribed curriculum.
  • Computer literacy: The following module must be completed during the first year of study: AIM 101 or AIM 102 (or AIM 111 and AIM 121).
  • If an elective module does not attract enough enrolments to be presented economically, the Dean may decide to withdraw it from the offering. Students will be advised in time of such a decision to enable them to register for another module.
  • A student may, with the consent of the Dean, exceed the number of modules per study year by two semester modules or one year module.
  • Recognition of modules already passed: A maximum of two semester modules from another faculty will be approved by the Dean, on condition that it is of adequate credit value and not yet presented for a completed degree.
  • CYE is not taken into account.
  • OST 410 comprises an independent study on a subject in any of the disciplines of the BTh (excluding Practical Formation) under the supervision of a lecturer of the relevant department.

Examinations and pass requirements

Special examinations
See General Regulations G.12.4 and G.12.6.
A student who complies with all the requirements for the degree with the exception of a maximum of two semester modules or one year module in each of which a combined mark of at least 40% has been obtained, may be admitted to a special examination in the modules concerned at the end of the following semester.

Promotion to next study year

1. To be admitted to the modules of the second year of study, a student must pass at least seven semester modules unless the Dean decides otherwise.
2. To be admitted to the modules of the third year of study, a student has to pass at least 15 semester modules, including Greek 110 and 120 and Hebrew 110 and 120, unless the Dean decides otherwise.
3. To be admitted to the modules of the fourth year of study, a student has to pass 24 semester modules including Greek 210 and 220 and Hebrew 210 and 220, unless the Dean decides otherwise.

Academic exclusion
The Dean may on recommendation of the relevant faculty committee, exclude a student academically by the cancellation of the registration for that particular year or the next year, if he or she does not comply with the minimum set requirements. You may appeal against academic exclusion.

Pass with distinction

The degree is conferred with distinction on a student who obtains an average of 75% (GPA) in all the prescribed modules of the final year and 75% in the independent study (OST 410), provided that not one of the modules had been failed previously and that the programme was completed within the minimum prescribed period.

General information

In order to qualify for the Dean’s list, a student must have an outstanding academic record for completed studies.

Undergraduate students (BDiv, BTh and Dip[Theol]) must have achieved an average of 75%(GPA)  or above in all of their years of study. No modules should have been repeated, and all modules must be registered in the same year for the specific year.

Honours students must achieve an average of 75% (GPA) or more. The degree must be completed in one year for full-time students and two years for part-time students. No modules should have been repeated.

Master’s students must achieve an average of 75% (GPA) or more, and the degree must be completed in the minimum prescribed time.

The top achievers of the Faculty selected to become part of the Dean’s list will annually be acknowledged at a function hosted by the Dean.

Minimum credits: 120

Electives:

Two semester modules from another faculty. Credit value may not exceed 24.

 

Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Greek grammar (1)
    The basic characteristics of Hellenistic Greek: the writing system and pronunciation, the Greek verb and noun systems, conjugation and declension, basic syntax and vocabulary. Passages from the Greek New Testament are adapted as exercises in order to facilitate linguistic proficiency. Continuous evaluation includes class tests and homework assignments.
    Greek grammar (2)
    Further study of the verb and noun systems of Hellenistic Greek, expansion of the basic vocabulary, and analysis of compound sentences. Adapted passages from the New Testament form the core of practical academic literacy exercises.

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  • Module content:

    Greek grammar (3)
    Further study of the verb and noun systems of Hellenistic Greek: middle and passive forms, the third declension, and analysis of compound sentences. Adapted passages from the New Testament form the core of practical academic literacy exercises.
    Greek texts: Read and comprehend
    Read selected texts from the NT and/or Apostolic Fathers, with emphasis on word analysis, basic translation, use of basic aids (dictionary, translations). Evaluation includes translation of unseen passages from the corpuses concerned.

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  • Module content:

    Hebrew grammar (1)
    Basic principles of the grammar of classical Hebrew: signs of writing and pronunciation, Hebrew morphology, the nominal and verbal system, basic syntax and vocabulary. Exercise basic competence by means of the analysis and translation of selected passages from the Hebrew Old Testament.
    Hebrew grammar (2)
    More advanced principles of the grammar of classical Hebrew: the function of nouns, verbs and particles, the derived formations of the verb. Passages from the Hebrew Old Testament from the basis for exercising academic literacy.

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  • Module content:

    Hebrew grammar (3)
    Continued study of the Hebrew verbal system: the irregular and weak verbs. Passages from the Hebrew Old Testament from the basis for students’ exercise in academic literacy.
    Hebrew texts: Read and comprehend
    Read selected texts from the OT, with emphasis on word analysis, basic translation, use of basic aids (dictionary, translations). Evaluation includes translation of unseen passages.

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  • Module content:

    Geographical and historical background of the Old Testament. The Near-Eastern cultural background of the Bible

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  • Module content:

    Reflection on the relationship between theology and spirituality.  The ambit, method and disciplines of theology.

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  • Module content:

    Fundamental module. The method and disciplinary ambit of Theology.

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  • Module content:

    The encyclopaedia of the New Testament. The Mediterranean socio-cultural setting of the New Testament.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    *This module is only offered in Afrikaans

    Taalkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse taalkunde met klem op lees-en skryfvaardigheid. Letterkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse en Nederlandse letterkunde aan die hand van kortverhale en gedigte.

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  • Module content:

    *This module is only offered in Afrikaans

    Taalkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse sintaksis, fonetiek en taalgeskiedenis. Letterkundekomponent:Inleiding tot die Romankuns Inleiding tot die Drama

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  • Module content:

    *Alternative evening classes - 2 discussion classes per week Introduction to Literature in English (1) This module introduces the study of literature by examining a number of texts representing different genres (poetry, prose, drama). The texts studied here will be mainly from the pre-twentieth century era and may include texts written in English from both Africa and other parts of the world. The aim of this module is to equip students with the critical and analytical skills required for a perceptive reading of poetry, novels and plays.

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  • Module content:

    *Alternative evening classes: 2 discussion classes per week
    Introduction to Literature in English (2)
    This module introduces the study of post-nineteenth century literature by examining a number of texts representing different genres (poetry, drama, prose). Texts will be from both Africa and other parts of the world. By the end of this module students should have the background and analytical skills to perceptively read modern and contemporary poetry, novels and plays.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to Philosophy
    The two semester modules at first-year level introduce students to the four main subfields of Philosophy, namely epistemology and metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy. This module introduces students to two of these subfields. Students must contact the Department of Philosophy to ascertain which two subfields are covered in each semester as the choice may change from time to time due to availability of teaching staff. Students will become acquainted with the nature of philosophical reflection by exploring a number of classical philosophical themes in each subfield. Throughout the module there is an emphasis on developing those critical thinking, reading and writing skills that are required in Philosophy, while students become acquainted with the power of critique as critical judgment and discernment.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to Philosophy
    The two semester modules at first-year level introduce students to the four main subfields of Philosophy, namely epistemology and metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy. This module introduces students to two of these subfields. Students must contact the Department of Philosophy to ascertain which two subfields are covered in each semester as the choice may change from time to time due to availability of teaching staff. Students will become acquainted with the nature of philosophical reflection by exploring a number of classical philosophical themes in each subfield. Throughout the module there is an emphasis on developing those critical thinking, reading and writing skills that are required in Philosophy, while students become acquainted with the power of critique as critical judgment and discernment.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Fundamental criminology
    Introduction to criminology, definition of crime, crime tendencies, classical and positivistic explanations of crime.
    Part 2: Violent crime
    A brief analysis of causes, consequences and mechanisms to prevent and reduce violent crime within a South African context. Define violent crime in terms of interpersonal violence, homicide, violent crimes within the criminal justice system and property-related violent crimes.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Penology
    In Penology attention is given to the criminal justice system to emphasise the importance of using an integrated approach in the handling of offenders.  The impact of overpopulation in prisons is critically evaluated. Attention is also given to awaiting trial offenders, the importance of community-based sentences as well as the re-integration of offenders in the community.
    Part 2: Crime prevention and control
    Responsibilities of the police and the community in crime prevention and control. Primary, secondary and tertiary crime prevention, crime prevention and reduction strategies in South Africa.

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Minimum credits: 120

Core modules

Minimum credits: 120

Core modules

Minimum credits: 120

Electives:

Five (5) semester modules from the prescribed list. In only one subject may both electives be chosen.

Core modules

Elective modules


The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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