Yearbooks

Programme: LLB

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
04130012 Faculty of Law Duration of study: 4 years Total credits: 506

Programme information

The LLB is the first professional qualification for legal practitioners and provides qualifiers with the necessary theoretical knowledge and practical skills to gain entry into the formal legal profession (eg attorneys/advocates), or to follow other careers in law.

Admission requirements

  • In order to register for degree programmes, NSC/IEB/Cambridge candidates must comply with the minimum requirements for degree studies as well as the minimum requirements for the relevant programme.
  • Life Orientation is excluded when calculating the Admission Point Score (APS). The following persons may also be considered for admission: a candidate who is in possession of a certificate that is deemed by the University to be equivalent to the required Grade 12 certificate with university endorsement; a candidate who is a graduate from another tertiary institution or has been granted the status of a graduate of such an institution; and a candidate who is a graduate of another faculty at the University of Pretoria.
    Note: Candidates who obtained a BA (Law) or BCom (Law) degree at UP will not be subjected to a selection process and will automatically be admitted to register for the LLB degree.
  • International students must obtain a full exemption certificate from Universities South Africa before they will be considered for admission.
  • A conditional exemption certificate is not accepted for admission to LLB studies.
  • LLB is a full-time four-year programme. Students are not permitted to obtain full-time employment while registered for LLB.
  • Only applicants who comply with all the above-mentioned admission requirements will be considered for admission.
 
Minimum requirements for 2017
Achievement level
Afrikaans or English APS
NSC/IEB HIGCSE AS-Level A-Level
5 3 C C

32*

*Candidates with an APS of 32 or higher will, on receipt of their applications, be accepted on a continuous basis until 30 September or until all available places have been taken. Candidates with an APS of 38 or higher will be accepted on a continuous basis until registration in January of the next academic year, irrespective of the number of candidates already accepted.

Other programme-specific information

The Dean determines which elective modules will be presented each year, taking into consideration the availability of lecturing personnel, space and financial implications and/or other circumstances. The Dean may determine the maximum number of registrations for a specific elective module. The Dean may, on recommendation of the relevant head of department, determine that a particular fourth-year elective module will not be offered where on the first day of lectures nine or fewer students are registered for the module.

The Dean has the discretion to credit any other legal module of equal standard passed at another institution as an elective.

The following aspects should be kept in mind:
• Students have to familiarise themselves with the prerequisites for modules from other faculties.
• The modules must fit in on the timetable.
• Number limits of some modules.

Advisory note: Students who intend to pursue an LLB degree must note that to obtain the LLB degree they will be required to obtain at least 24 credits from the following list of language modules: AFR 110, AFR 120, AFR 114, ENG 118, ENG 110, ENG 120. 

Elective modules for fourth year of study: 

4 modules selected from the following list:
• Law and transformation 410 (AMR 410)
• Alternative dispute resolution 420 (AGF 420)
• Child law 410 (KID 410)
• Deeds and notarial practice 410 (ANO 410) [prerequisite: SAR 310]
• Education law 420 (ONR 420)
• Environmental law 410 (OMR 410)
• Information and communications technology law 420 (KUB 420)
• International elective module 1 (IET 411)
• International elective module 2 (IET 412)
• International elective module 3 (IET 413)
• International elective module 4 (IET 414)
• International humanitarian law 420 (PUR 420)
• Jurisprudence 420 (JUR 420)
• Land and land reform law 420 (GHR 420)
• Law and the community 420 (CLW 420)
• Law of banking and financial institutions 410 (LBF 410)
• Law of damages 410 (SGR 410)
• Law of securities 410 (LOC 410)
• Legal problems of HIV and Aids 410 (RHV 410)
• Media law 420 (MDR 420)
• Medical law 410 (GRG 410)
• Moot Court 420 (SKH 420)(students representing UP in the African Human Rights Moot Court Competition or in the Phillip Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition)
• Municipal law 410 (MRG 410)
• Practical law 400 (PRR 400)(see # below) (20 credits; 2 electives)
• Private international law 410 (IPR 410)
• Social security law 420 (SOR 420)
• Sports law 420 (SRR 420)
• Statutory crimes 410 (SMI 410)
• Tax practice 420 (BLP 420)
• Transnational business law 420 (TBR 420)
• Trusts and estates 410 (TBS 410)

# Practical law 400
The number of students who may be admitted to the module Practical law (PRR 400) is predetermined by the Dean, in consultation with the Head of the Department of Procedural Law.
Prospective students must apply for admission to the module.
Should more students apply for admission to the module than can be accepted, a selection process will take place on the basis of a student's previous performance and an interview with the Director of the Law Clinic.
Students are promoted on the basis of tests, satisfactory execution of assignments, sessions in the Law Clinic and an oral examination.
Practical law (PRR 400) counts 20 credits and counts as two electives.
Certain modules are only applicable to exchange students.

General requirements
1. Repeating of modules and maximum number of modules per year
• Students who fail modules must repeat the modules in the following year.
• Students will, however, not be allowed to take more than 200 credits per year. (This will mean that in certain instances students will not be allowed to take all the modules required for a specific year as the outstanding modules must first be repeated and passed.) The Dean may, however, exercise discretion to grant exemption from this provision.
• It is the student’s responsibility to choose modules that will not lead to class, test or examination timetable clashes.

2. Credit for modules
Students transferring from another university can only obtain credit for at the most 50% of the modules needed for the degree and must complete at least 50% of the modules at the University of Pretoria.

Dean's merit list
The Student Administration office publishes the Dean’s merit list by March of every calendar year. The list contains the student numbers, in chronological sequence, of those students who achieved a weighted average (ie in accordance with the credit value of each module) of at least 75% in the preceding calendar year.

The weighted average is calculated as follows: The final mark obtained for each module for which the student registered in the preceding calendar year is multiplied by the credit value for that particular module. The sum of the values so obtained for each module are added together and divided by the total of the credit values of all modules for which the student registered in the preceding calendar year. The average so calculated is not rounded off.

A student who failed module(s) or who failed to gain entrance to the exam in the module(s) in a given calendar year may not appear on the Dean’s merit list for that calendar year. A student who registered for less than nine modules in a calendar year may not appear on the Dean’s merit list for that calendar year. Modules passed at other universities are not considered in calculating the weighted average.
 

Examinations and pass requirements

Please consult the Examination and Test policy as contained in the Faculty Regulations.

Promotion to next study year

Promotion to next study year
(According to Regulation G.3 the Faculty Board may set promotion requirements which students must adhere to before they will be promoted.)

  1. A student must pass modules to the value of 60 credits in order to be promoted to the next year of study.
  2. A student who passed less than 4 semester modules will not be readmitted to the Faculty of Law. A student, who has forfeited readmission to the Faculty, may apply in writing to the Admissions Committee of the Faculty for conditional readmission to the Faculty – with the proviso that the Admissions Committee may stipulate further requirements for progress. A student’s application for conditional readmission to the Faculty may be refused.
  3. A student who has been conditionally readmitted to the Faculty will have his/her studies monitored after the first-semester examination in order to determine whether such student has met the set conditions.

Re-registration will only be permitted if a student is capable of completing the degree in the prescribed minimum period of 4 years plus a further 2 years according to the opinion of the Admissions Committee.

Pass with distinction

For the 4-year LLB degree to be awarded with distinction, a student must obtain a grade point average (ie in accordance with the credit value of each module) of at least 75% in respect of all the modules prescribed for the third and fourth years of the LLB degree, completed at this University. The grade point average is calculated as follows: The final mark obtained for each third- and fourth-year module prescribed for the LLB degree, including the electives, is multiplied by the credit value of that particular module. The sum of these values are added together and divided by the total of the credit values of all prescribed third- and fourth-year LLB modules. The average so calculated is not rounded off. A student who failed a third- or fourth-year LLB module, including any of the electives, may not be awarded the degree with distinction.

BA (Law) graduates
For the LLB degree to be awarded with distinction to a BA (Law) (UP) graduate, a student must obtain a grade point average (ie in accordance with the credit value of each module) of at least 75% in respect of the following modules completed at this University:

RPK 210 and 220
VBB 220
BLR 310
BWR 300
IGZ 320
ISR 310
ODR 320
PBL 310 and 320
SAR 310
VHD 320
ABR 410
PBL 410 and 420
PVR 420
SIP 400
SKY 410
SPR 400
Four final-year electives

The grade point average is calculated as follows: The final mark obtained for each of the modules listed above, including the electives, is multiplied by the credit value of that particular module. The sum of these values are added together and divided by the total of the credit values of the modules listed above. The average so calculated is not rounded off. A BA (Law) (UP) graduate who failed any of the modules listed above, including any of the electives, may not be awarded the LLB degree with distinction.

BCom (Law) graduates
For the LLB degree to be awarded with distinction to a BCom (Law) (UP) graduate, a student must obtain a grade point average (ie in accordance with the credit value of each module) of at least 75% in respect of the following modules completed at this University:

FMR 121
PBL 200
RPK 210 and 220
RPR 210
RVW 210
BLR 310
BWR 300
IGZ 320
JUR 310
PBL 310 and 320
ABR 410
PBL 410 and 420
PVR 420
SIP 400
SKY 410
SPR 400
Four final-year electives

The grade point average is calculated as follows: The final mark obtained for each of the modules listed above, including the electives, is multiplied by the credit value of that particular module. The sum of these values are added together and divided by the total of the credit values of the modules listed above. The average so calculated is not rounded off. A BCom (Law) (UP) graduate who failed any of the modules listed above, including any of the electives, may not be awarded the LLB degree with distinction.

Minimum credits: 121

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BA/BCom specialising in law
    The module has both a theoretical and skills component. All elements described below will encompass conceptual knowledge combined with practical application.
    UNDERLYING JURISPRUDENTIAL ASPECTS OF LAW / THE LAW IN GENERAL
    (a) A first-year definition of law / the Law
    (b) The relationships between law and society, law and history, law and politics, law and language
    (c) Being a law student or lawyer in South Africa
    (d) Introduction to different perspectives on the law

    THE SOUTH AFRICAN LEGAL SYSTEM AND ITS HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT
    SOURCES OF SOUTH AFRICAN LAW AND THEIR HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT
    (a) Introduction to characteristics and components of the South African legal system
    (b) Mixed legal systems
    (c) The South African Constitution and its historical development
    (d) Customary law and its historical development
    (e) Common law and its historical development
    (f) Primary and other sources of modern South African law
    (g) Applying the sources of law to a set of facts and relying on the sources of law to answer a jurisprudential question.

    THE ABOVE CONTENT FORMS THE BASIS OF THE SKILLS COMPONENT (INCORPORATING ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS) WHICH CONSISTS OF:
    (a) Conducting research in the library
    (b) Finding, reading and applying the sources of law
    (c) Reading, understanding and summarising texts on topics of law
    (d) Analysing, criticising and improving (“edit”) a piece of writing on the law in a theoretical sense; and
    (e) Writing a well-constructed essay or paragraph on legal problems and topics of law or legal history.

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BA/BCom specialising in law
    BASIC PRINCIPLES OF THE:
    (a) Law of obligations (contract and delict)
    (b) Criminal law
    (c) Law of civil procedure;
    (d) Law of criminal procedure; and
    (e) Law of evidence.

    ACCESS TO JUSTICE:
    (a) Courts and alternative dispute resolution;
    (b) Legal profession; and
    (c) Access to justice and its promotion in South Africa (the idea, problems, representation in criminal matters, role of different organisations, etc).

    THE ABOVE CONTENT FORMS THE BASIS OF THE SKILLS COMPONENT (INCORPORATING ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS) WHICH CONSISTS OF:
    (a) Drafting a simple contract based upon a set of facts (law of contract)
    (b) Reading, understanding, summarising a case on the law of delict and applying the principles of legal argument and logic to it
    (c) Summarising, analysing, criticising and improving (“edit”) a piece of writing on the law of evidence
    (d) Understanding and applying the principles of examination in chief, cross-examination and re-examination to a concrete set of facts with a view to participation in a “moot court” or debate.

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  • Module content:

    Find, evaluate, process, manage and present information resources for academic purposes using appropriate technology. Apply effective search strategies in different technological environments. Demonstrate the ethical and fair use of information resources. Integrate 21st-century communications into the management of academic information.

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    *This module is only offered in Afrikaans

    Taalkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse taalkunde met klem op lees-en skryfvaardigheid. Letterkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse en Nederlandse letterkunde aan die hand van kortverhale en gedigte.

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  • Module content:

    Afrikaans for speakers of other languages (1) *No mother tongue speakers of Afrikaans will be allowed to take this module. A subject for advanced learners of Afrikaans. A basic knowledge of Afrikaans grammar and listening, reading, writing and speaking skills are required.

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  • Module content:

    *This module is only offered in Afrikaans

    Taalkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse sintaksis, fonetiek en taalgeskiedenis. Letterkundekomponent:Inleiding tot die Romankuns Inleiding tot die Drama

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  • Module content:

    *Alternative evening classes - 2 discussion classes per week Introduction to Literature in English (1) This module introduces the study of literature by examining a number of texts representing different genres (poetry, prose, drama). The texts studied here will be mainly from the pre-twentieth century era and may include texts written in English from both Africa and other parts of the world. The aim of this module is to equip students with the critical and analytical skills required for a perceptive reading of poetry, novels and plays.

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  • Module content:

    *Alternative evening classes: 2 discussion classes per week
    Introduction to Literature in English (2)
    This module introduces the study of post-nineteenth century literature by examining a number of texts representing different genres (poetry, drama, prose). Texts will be from both Africa and other parts of the world. By the end of this module students should have the background and analytical skills to perceptively read modern and contemporary poetry, novels and plays.

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BA/BCom specialising in Law
    The legal rules in respect of the coming into existence, private law status and termination of a natural person or legal subject

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  • Module content:

    This module is intended to equip students with a thorough knowledge of English grammar and is particularly useful for those interested in a career in teaching, editing, document design or other forms of language practice.

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BA/BCom specialising in law (a) Introduction to family law (b) General principles regarding the coming into existence of a marriage (c) Void, voidable and putative marriages (d) The invariable consequences of the marriage (e) Basic principles regarding the legal relationship between child and parent (f) The variable consequences of a marriage (g) Principles regarding the dissolution of a marriage (h) The consequences of the dissolution of a marriage Law of Parent and Child; (a) Variable consequences of marriage; (b) Dissolution of marriage; (c) Consequences of the dissolution of marriage; (d) Customary marriages; and (e) Domestic partnerships and religious marriages.

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BA/BCom specialising in law
    General introduction to Roman law and European law as foundations of South African private law
    INTRODUCTION TO THE ROMAN LAW OF THINGS
    (a) Things, real rights, possession
    (b) Ownership, limitations, acquisition, protection
    (c) Limited real rights, servitudes, real security

    INTRODUCTION TO THE ROMAN LAW OF CONTRACT
    (a) General principles of the law of contract
    (b) Specific contracts
    (c) Quasi contracts

    INTRODUCTION TO THE ROMAN LAW OF DELICT
    (a) General principles of the law of delict
    (b) Specific delicts
    (c) Quasi delicts

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Introduction to Philosophy
    The two semester modules at first-year level introduce students to the four main subfields of Philosophy, namely epistemology and metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy. This module introduces students to two of these subfields. Students must contact the Department of Philosophy to ascertain which two subfields are covered in each semester as the choice may change from time to time due to availability of teaching staff. Students will become acquainted with the nature of philosophical reflection by exploring a number of classical philosophical themes in each subfield. Throughout the module there is an emphasis on developing those critical thinking, reading and writing skills that are required in Philosophy, while students become acquainted with the power of critique as critical judgment and discernment.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to Philosophy
    The two semester modules at first-year level introduce students to the four main subfields of Philosophy, namely epistemology and metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy. This module introduces students to two of these subfields. Students must contact the Department of Philosophy to ascertain which two subfields are covered in each semester as the choice may change from time to time due to availability of teaching staff. Students will become acquainted with the nature of philosophical reflection by exploring a number of classical philosophical themes in each subfield. Throughout the module there is an emphasis on developing those critical thinking, reading and writing skills that are required in Philosophy, while students become acquainted with the power of critique as critical judgment and discernment.

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  • Module content:

    The nature and function of accounting; the development of accounting; financial position; financial result; the recording process; processing of accounting data; treatment of VAT; elementary income statement and balance sheet; flow of documents; accounting systems; introduction to internal control and internal control measures; bank reconciliations; control accounts; adjustments; financial statements of a sole proprietorship; the accounting framework.

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  • Module content:

    The making of the Modern World: a survey
    A selection of themes on Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe and their contribution to the making of the Modern World.

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  • Module content:

    Africa and South Africa: a survey
    An overview focusing on the making of African and South African societies from the earliest times to the present with emphasis on the most significant historical forces, factors and events.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Fundamental criminology
    Introduction to criminology, definition of crime, crime tendencies, classical and positivistic explanations of crime.
    Part 2: Violent crime
    A brief analysis of causes, consequences and mechanisms to prevent and reduce violent crime within a South African context. Define violent crime in terms of interpersonal violence, homicide, violent crimes within the criminal justice system and property-related violent crimes.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Penology
    In Penology attention is given to the criminal justice system to emphasise the importance of using an integrated approach in the handling of offenders.  The impact of overpopulation in prisons is critically evaluated. Attention is also given to awaiting trial offenders, the importance of community-based sentences as well as the re-integration of offenders in the community.
    Part 2: Crime prevention and control
    Responsibilities of the police and the community in crime prevention and control. Primary, secondary and tertiary crime prevention, crime prevention and reduction strategies in South Africa.

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  • Module content:

    Basics of politics
    An introduction to the study of organised political society at national and international levels with specific reference to political concepts, approaches and methods. The emphasis is on state and governance as frameworks for analysis. This includes the development and comparison of related political entities, processes and regime types of a democratic and non-democratic nature, also considering the salient changes brought about by globalisation.

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  • Module content:

    Cooperation in the political world
    An introduction to cooperation at national and international levels with specific reference to the nature, foundations and politics of cooperation. This includes an analysis and comparison of the politicisation, localisation and internationalisation of issues and of the problems at national, regional and international levels related to cooperation in an increasingly interdependent world characterised by the absence of supranational institutions. Attention is also paid to the corresponding dynamics of regime development, performance and change.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: The individual and society
    An introduction to sociology, the classical sociological paradigm and the principles of sociological research.

    Part 2: The making of the South African order

    This section explores key factors involved in the making and shaping of the contemporary South African social order and considers the sociological implications thereof. Students will be introduced to the political economy of South Africa, with an emphasis on the nature of South Africa’s industrialisation, the process of proletarianisation and the introduction of the migration labour system. In addition, the racial state, the foundations of its social project, and the spatial form of its 20th century racial modernity will be considered.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: The sociology of institutions
    An introduction to the social dynamics of institutions such as the family, the state, the economy, religion, education, and civil society, with specific focus on Southern Africa.

    Part 2: Social stratification: Race, class and gender
    The nature and dynamics of social stratification and inequality will be explored. Race, gender and class are the foci of the section. The South African reality in this regard is highlighted.

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  • Module content:

    Budgeting, payroll accounting, taxation – income tax and an introduction to other types of taxes, credit and the new Credit Act, insurance, accounting for inventories (focus on inventory and the accounting entries, not calculations), interpretation of financial statements.

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Minimum credits: 120

Core modules

  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BCom specialising in law
    (a) Law of purchase and sale
    (b) Law of letting and hiring of things
    (c) Law of agency
    (d) Law of surety
    (e) Law of letting and hiring of work

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BA specialising in law
    (a) Indigenous culture groups, their culture, and the definition of legal pluralism
    (b) Law of persons and family law of indigenous culture groups
    (c) Indigenous law of delict
    (d) Indigenous law of succession
    (e) Indigenous law of contract
    (f)  Legal conflict and court structure
    (g) Legal systems based on religion in South Africa

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB, BAdmin, BA specialising in law and BCom Taxation
    Statute law:
    (a) General introduction: relationship between text and context
    (b) What is legislation: categories and types of legislation
    (c) The structure and format of legislation (enacted law texts)
    (d) Commencement, amendment and demise of legislation
    Principles of interpretation:
    (a) How to interpret legislation: various theories and methods of interpretation and
    the influence of the supreme Constitution on statutory interpretation
    (b) Internal and external aids to determine the legislative purpose
    (c) So-called peremptory and directory provisions
    (d) Statutory interpretation and judicial lawmaking
    (e) Basic principles of constitutional interpretation

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BCom specialising in law
    (a) Basic principles of the National Credit Act 34 of 2005
    (b) Aspects regarding the law applicable to credit agreements
    (c) Basic principles of the Consumer Protection Act 68 of 2008

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB, BA specialising in law; BAdmin and BCom law (a) Introduction to constitutional law theory (b) Basic principles: the law, the state and the individual (c) The historical development of the South African constitutional law (d) Different elements of a state (e) Sources of the South African constitutional law (f) The founding provisions, the legal order and symbols of the South African state (g) Cooperative government (h) The national legislative authority (i) The president and the national executive authority (j) Provincial government (k) Judicial authority (l) The Bill of Rights: History of human rights in South Africa, jurisprudential and political perspectives on human rights, application, justiciability and interpretation of the bill of rights, jurisdiction, procedures and remedies, limitation of human rights, an analysis of selected human rights (m) State institutions supporting constitutional democracy (n) The public administration (o) The South African security services (p) General provisions

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BA/BCom specialising in Law

    (a) Intestate succession

    (b) Testate succession

    (c) Administration of states

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BA/BCom specialising in law
    (a) General principles of the law of obligations
    (b) Formation of the contract
    (c) Content of the contract
    (d) Interpretation of written contracts
    (e) Breach of contract
    (f) Remedies for breach of contract
    (g) Termination of contractual obligations
    (h) Drafting of contracts

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB ((a) An overview of the origin and development of the various legal professions (b) Statutory provisions applicable to the legal profession (c) Professional conduct and ethics (d) Professional costs and fees (e) Professional liability of legal practitioners (f) Research skills (g) Writing skills (letter of advice to client; office memorandum; heads of argument)

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB (a) Practice management (b) Taking of instructions (c) Bookkeeping for legal practices (d) Aspects of trial advocacy (e) Practical application (f) Research skills (g) Writing skills (letter of advice to client; office memorandum; heads of argument)

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Minimum credits: 127

Core modules

  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BA/BCom specialising in law
    (a) General principles of the law of delict
    (b) Capita selecta from the principles applicable to specific delicts

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB (a) General principles of intellectual property law (b) Copyright (c) Law relating to inventions and designs (d) Trademark law (e) Law relating to plant breeders' rights (f) Law of competition

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BA/BCom specialising in law
    (a) General principles of the law of things
    (b) Constitutional aspects
    (c) Control (possession and holdership)
    (d) Ownership (including joint ownership and sectional-title property)
    (e) Limited real rights (including servitudes, limiting provisions, public servitudes, mineral rights and real security rights)

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BCom specialising in Law (a) Elements of negotiability; the bill of exchange, cheque and promissory note; parties to bills, cheques and notes (b) Requirements for validity, negotiation, holdership and acceptance (c) The banker-client relationship; crossings and additions to crossings; the legal position of the drawee and collecting bank (d) Electronic payment methods

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  • Module content:

    **For LLB and BCom specialising in law
    (a) General introduction and historical background
    (b) The process of sequestration
    (c) Effects of sequestration
    (d) Voidable and void dispositions
    (e) Overview of administration of insolvent estates
    (f) Composition, rehabilitation and offences
    (g) Liquidation of insolvent companies and close corporations

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BCom specialising in law
    (a) Company law
    (b) Law relating to close corporations
    (c) Partnership law

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB
    (a) Foundations of income tax
    (b) Calculation of income tax payable
    (c) Capital gains tax

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BA specializing in Law
    An overview of the most important jurisprudential approaches amongst others natural law, positivism, realism, critical legal theory, modern and post-modern approaches. The theoretical and practical value of these approaches are investigated within a post-apartheid context.

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB
    (a) The historical development and theory of international law
    (b) Sources of international law
    (c) Territory
    (d) International legal personality
    (e) Jurisdiction, immunity from jurisdiction and extradition
    (f) Self-contained legal regimes and state responsibility
    (g) Judicial settlement of international disputes
    (h) International law in municipal law

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB
    (a) Basic principles of the law of evidence and rules relating to the admissibility of specific categories of evidence.
    (b) Evidential aspects relating to the giving of evidence and the constitutional implications for the law of evidence.

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB and BAdmin
    An overview of judicial review of administrative action in light of the Constitution and the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act 3 of 2000, with a focus on the legitimate scope of such judicial review and the grounds for judicial review.

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB
    The module includes the following:


    (a) How to plan a research project
    (b) Reading strategies and techniques
    (c) Broad theoretical approaches and methodologies (Sociology of law, Legal pluralism, Legal history, Comparison)
    (d) Citation, ethics of citation, presentation and language
    (e) How to write a research proposal and general drafting (As this module is a prerequisite to register for SKY 410, attendance at all the sessions and a mark of at least 50% for the submitted research proposal are required in order to obtain the prescribed credits)

     

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Minimum credits: 140

Core modules

  • Module content:

    *For LLB Capita selecta from any of the following: (a) Enrichment (b) Estoppel (c) Personality rights

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB
    (a) The general principles of criminal procedure law in the lower courts, High Court and the High Court of Appeal of South Africa.
    (b) Drafting of pleadings
    (c) Practical application

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB
    Introduction to criminal law:
    (a) Criminal law and the legal system
    (b) Criminal law and law of delict
    (c) The concepts "criminal law" and "crime"
    (d) The history and sources of our criminal law
    (e) Determinism and indeterminism
    (f)  The purpose and function of the criminal law and crime
    (g) The classification of criminal law and crimes
    General principles of criminal law: elements of criminal liability:
    (a) Legality
    (b) The deed
    (c) Unlawfulness
    (d) Capacity
    (e) Fault
    (f) Multiple defences

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB
    Specific crimes:
    (a) Attempt, incitement and conspiracy
    (b) Participation and accessories after the fact
    (c) Crimes against life
    (d) Crimes against bodily integrity and parental authority
    (e) Crimes against reputation and dignity
    (f)  Crimes against property and freedom of will
    (g) Crimes against sexual morality and family life
    (h) Crimes against public morality and religious feelings
    (i)  Crimes against the administration of justice and public administration
    (j)  Crimes against the state
    Punishment:
    (a) Theories of punishment
    (b) Forms of punishment

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB
    a) Individual labour law
    b) Collective labour law
    c) Resolution of labour disputes

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB
    (a) Aspects of litigation techniques
    (b) General principles of civil procedure
    (c) Practical application
    (d) Compiling pleadings

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  • Module content:

    *For LLB
    (a) The essay deals with a subject from the field of law.
    (b) The supervisor advises final-year students of the date on which the subject of the essay must be submitted to him for approval.
    (c) The head of department responsible for the subject, or a lecturer designated by him/her, acts as project leader and as examiner: Provided that the head of department may appoint an external examiner should he/she deem it necessary.
    (d) Two typed, duplicated or printed copies of the essay of between 8 000 and 14 000 words (with an indication of the amount of words on the last page of the essay), must be submitted. The date when the essay must be submitted will be communicated.
    Each lecturer supervises a maximum of 15 students annually. The topics chosen by these students must preferably be thematically linked. At the beginning of the year, all registered students as a group attend one compulsory lecture on the approach to and writing of an essay. Following this, each lecturer organises one seminar of two hours with his or her group of students, during which students submit the topics and basic structure of their essays.
    After completion of the essays, a copy of each essay is made available to students. For this purpose, one copy must be handed in at the library, and the other at the supervisor. The lecturer then organises a further series of seminars, where each student presents his or her conclusions for the group to criticise. At these seminars, the lecturer also involves another faculty member or expert.
    The evaluation is as follows:
    Written document: 70%
    Participation in seminar: 30%
    Draft essay: 10%

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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