Yearbooks

Programme: BA Fine Arts

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
01130103 Faculty of Humanities Duration of study: 4 years Total credits: 486
Contact:
Miss A Sooful
[email protected]

Programme information

This programme focuses on the main disciplines in fine arts, ie painting, sculpture, graphic printmaking, drawing and new media, as well as on the theories and concepts of art. Graduates qualify as professional artists. The programme is aimed at the promotion of aesthetic awareness and the broadening of visual, critical and creative thinking. The programme also incorporates art management, art communication and marketing, digital training and the use of a wide range of artists materials, media and techniques.

Closing date for applications: 30 June annually

Admission requirements

  • The following persons will be considered for admission: a candidate who is in possession of a certificate that is deemed by the University to be equivalent to the required Grade 12 certificate with university endorsement; a candidate who is a graduate from another tertiary institution or has been granted the status of a graduate of such an institution; and a candidate who is a graduate of another faculty at the University of Pretoria.
  • Candidates who comply with the minimum subject requirements and achievement levels as well as the APS requirements of these programmes will be granted placement in the programmes, subject to the availability of space. The abovementioned is not applicable to selection programmes.
  • To retain admission, learners will be expected to obtain an APS of at least 28 in Grade 12. Prospective students who have already been granted provisional admission in these programmes, but obtained at least an APS of 27 in Grade 12, will be considered by the Admission Committee should space be available. The Admission Committee of the Faculty of Humanities will consider these students once the results of the National Benchmark Test (NBT) are available and depending on the availability of space.
  • The Faculty will assess satisfactory performance in the NBT in the light of its commitment to ensure that an appropriate proportion of the applicants will be drawn from the disadvantaged category of the population.
  • Applicants who meet the minimum APS requirement, but who do not comply with the subject requirements must write the NBT.
  • Life Orientation is excluded when calculating the APS.
  • Departmental selection for this degree programme involves a merit selection process and a final selection process, as well as the submission of a questionnaire and a portfolio of at least 20 recent works, which must be submitted to the Department of Visual Arts by 30 June. Detailed information about the selection process and the portfolio requirements can be obtained at www.up.ac.za/visualarts. Based on the questionnaire and the portfolio, you will be notified whether you qualify to continue with the final selection process. If your merit selection was successful, you will be invited to attend the final selection process, which consists of visualisation
    tests, practical tests and an interview. The final selection process takes place during August. You will be notified by end August of the result of the final selection tests. Approximately 100 applicants will be invited to take part in the final selection process.

Minimum requirements

Achievement level

APS

Afrikaans or English

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

5

3

C

C

30

Additional requirements

Departmental selection is necessary prior to admission to this programme. Although Art as a Grade 12 subject is not a requirement, a candidate must be able to demonstrate his/her creative potential and commitment to the chosen field of study. Candidates are therefore required to submit a portfolio of work for a merit selection review and, if invited, undergo a series of tests and be interviewed by a selection committee. Contact the coordinator for more information. A student who chooses this programme must work in an appropriate design studio, approved by the coordinator, for at least six weeks during the third and fourth years.

Other programme-specific information

Students who are deemed NOT to be at risk of their level of academic literacy, are exempted from ALL 110 and ALL 125.

Promotion to next study year

##Promotion to the second year of study

Pass: BKK 100, VIT 100, VKK 111, 121, and 123.

##Promotion to the third year of study

Pass: BKK 200, VKK 211 and 222.

##Promotion to the fourth year of study

Pass: BKK 300, VKK 311 and 321.

##The Dean may approve exceptions to these requirements on the recommendation of the head of the department.

Pass with distinction

The degree is awarded with distinction to a candidate who obtains at least 75% in BKK 400 and in VKK 401.

Minimum credits: 138

Promotion to the second year of study

Pass: BKK 100, VIT 100, VKK 111, 121, and 123

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    Foundations of visual culture
    This module introduces art and visual culture theory using a wide range of texts and ideas. The module gives students wide exposure to visual discourses and includes a variety of visual culture examples e.g. artworks, advertisements. These discourses may include:  exploring what visual culture is; modes of analysis; introducing terminology such as ideology and myth; dealing with selected periods from history contextually; introducing cultural icons and themes from popular visual culture.

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  • Module content:

    Find, evaluate, process, manage and present information resources for academic purposes using appropriate technology. Apply effective search strategies in different technological environments. Demonstrate the ethical and fair use of information resources. Integrate 21st-century communications into the management of academic information.

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  • Module content:

    This module intends to equip students to cope more confidently and competently with the reading and understanding of a variety of texts, to apply these skills in a variety of contexts and to follow the conventions of academic writing.

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  • Module content:

    This module equips students to understand and use a range of discipline-specific terminology; apply the strategies of critical and comprehensive reading to their own academic literacy; apply the conventions of academic writing to their own writing, using the process approach, to produce intelligible academic texts and use the correct referencing technique as required by the faculty.

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    Exploration of the profession of the artist. Introduction to the fundamental elements and principles of two- and three-dimensional art. Analysis of works of art. Synthesis and application of acquired knowledge with selected mediums, materials and techniques.

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  • Module content:

    *Requires departmental selection
    Practical skills acquisition and direct application of studio practice to a wide variety of art processes, techniques and materials. General art training focusing on market-related art activities.

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  • Module content:

    Images across media: current issues
    This module presents an introduction into the ways in which images appear across media in contemporary visual culture from a specific African perspective within the global. This is done by means of exploring key modes, themes, genres, platforms and visual texts. Among the media and mediums that may be covered are photography, art, graphic design, advertising, film, documentaries, video, digital and social media. 

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  • Module content:

    Images across media: historical perspectives

    This module presents a historical overview of the ways in which images have appeared across media in visual culture from a specific African vantage point within the global. This is done by means of exploring key modes, themes and visual texts with the aim of fostering an understanding of how historical events and cultural and ideological trends underpin the visual. Among the topics that may be covered are the progression of graphic and industrial design from the Industrial Revolution, photography, art, fashion, dress, magazines, printed culture and postcards. The module also provides an introduction to research approaches and methods in the field of visual culture. 

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    *This module is only offered in Afrikaans

    Taalkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse taalkunde met klem op lees-en skryfvaardigheid. Letterkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse en Nederlandse letterkunde aan die hand van kortverhale en gedigte.

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  • Module content:

    *This module is only offered in Afrikaans

    Taalkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse sintaksis, fonetiek en taalgeskiedenis. Letterkundekomponent:Inleiding tot die Romankuns Inleiding tot die Drama

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to Anthropology
    This introduction to anthropology introduces basic themes of the discipline including ritual, religion, marriage and sex.  It combines classic studies with recent scholarship, and asks the 'big question' about human society and human cultures that offer challenging perspectives on the world we live in.

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  • Module content:

    Small places, Large issues
    This module builds on the ethnographic and theoretical themes introduced in APL 110, asking particular questions about how we may think about the relationship between the local and the global; indigenous and universal; public and private; the real and the possible.

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  • Module content:

    *Alternative evening classes - 2 discussion classes per week Introduction to Literature in English (1) This module introduces the study of literature by examining a number of texts representing different genres (poetry, prose, drama). The texts studied here will be mainly from the pre-twentieth century era and may include texts written in English from both Africa and other parts of the world. The aim of this module is to equip students with the critical and analytical skills required for a perceptive reading of poetry, novels and plays.

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  • Module content:

    *Alternative evening classes: 2 discussion classes per week
    Introduction to Literature in English (2)
    This module introduces the study of post-nineteenth century literature by examining a number of texts representing different genres (poetry, drama, prose). Texts will be from both Africa and other parts of the world. By the end of this module students should have the background and analytical skills to perceptively read modern and contemporary poetry, novels and plays.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to Philosophy
    The two semester modules at first-year level introduce students to the four main subfields of Philosophy, namely epistemology and metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy. This module introduces students to two of these subfields. Students must contact the Department of Philosophy to ascertain which two subfields are covered in each semester as the choice may change from time to time due to availability of teaching staff. Students will become acquainted with the nature of philosophical reflection by exploring a number of classical philosophical themes in each subfield. Throughout the module there is an emphasis on developing those critical thinking, reading and writing skills that are required in Philosophy, while students become acquainted with the power of critique as critical judgment and discernment.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to Philosophy
    The two semester modules at first-year level introduce students to the four main subfields of Philosophy, namely epistemology and metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy. This module introduces students to two of these subfields. Students must contact the Department of Philosophy to ascertain which two subfields are covered in each semester as the choice may change from time to time due to availability of teaching staff. Students will become acquainted with the nature of philosophical reflection by exploring a number of classical philosophical themes in each subfield. Throughout the module there is an emphasis on developing those critical thinking, reading and writing skills that are required in Philosophy, while students become acquainted with the power of critique as critical judgment and discernment.

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  • Module content:

    This module is a general orientation to Psychology. An introduction is given to various theoretical approaches in Psychology, and the development of Psychology as a science is discussed. Selected themes from everyday life are explored and integrated with psychological principles. This module focuses on major personality theories. An introduction is given to various paradigmatic approaches in Psychology.

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  • Module content:

    This module introduces the student to a basic knowledge and understanding of the biological basis of human behaviour. The module addresses the key concepts and terminology related to the biological subsystem, the rules and principles guiding biological psychology, and identification of the interrelatedness of different biological systems and subsystems. In this module various cognitive processes are studied, including perception, memory, thinking, intelligence and creativity. Illustrations are given of various thinking processes, such as problem solving, critical, analytic and integrative thinking.

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  • Module content:

    The world of religion
    What is religion? The functions of religion. Studying religion. Perspectives on religion. Common concepts and key terms in various religions will be dealt with - also generic dimensions and aspects.  The interdependence of religion, culture and society.

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  • Module content:

    Kaleidoscope of religions
    The occurrence of religion in societies. Types of religion. Primal religions. Christianity, Judaism, Islam.  A variety of religions will be addressed: capita selecta will be made from Christianity; Hinduism; Buddhism; New Religions; New Age; main developments in the world and South Africa.

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Minimum credits: 120

Promotion to the third year of study

Pass: BKK 200, VIT 200, VKK 211 and 221

Core modules

  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    Technique, medium, style, form and content: exploration of technique, medium, style, form and content of two- and three-dimensional art works. An analytical methodology is followed to acquire skills in the traditional fine arts disciplines of painting, sculpture, graphic printmaking, drawing and new media.

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  • Module content:

    *Requires departmental selection
    Advanced technical and technological application in two-dimensional and three-dimensional art, applied art and electronic art.

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  • Module content:

    Gender, sexuality and visual representation
    Introduction to the representation of sex, gender and sexuality in visual culture.  Gender theory and terminology related to feminism, masculinity studies and lbgtq theory (lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgendered, queer) are unpacked. Themes and issues in gender and identity politics such as the male hero, the nude in late 19th century art, the femme fatale, hysteria, androgyny and transsexuality are dealt with. Sexuality and gender issues across a range of visual cultural such as soaps, sitcoms, artworks, advertisements, fashion, music videos and films are addressed.

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  • Module content:

    Visual (Post)colonialisms This module investigates aspects of Africanness, Afrocentrism, multiculturalism, transnationalism and the African diaspora and studies a cross section of work including traditional art, tourist art and the hybrid aesthetics of contemporary African art and visual culture. The module also focuses on the ideology of imperialism and colonialism and its influence on art and visual culture from the nineteenth century onwards. The influence of postcolonial thinking on the deconstruction of the ideology of colonialism is highlighted with reference to landscape and memory, the exotic and primitivism in South African visual culture.

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Minimum credits: 120

Promotion to the fourth year of study

Pass: BKK 300, VIT 300, VKK 311 

Core modules

  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    Visual research skills and critical issues in Visual Arts that highlight individual peculiarities of expression and material are explored. Approach to technique, medium, style and content in painting, sculpture, graphic printmaking and new media, leads to individual and personal identity within a South African context.

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  • Module content:

    *Requires departmental selection
    Research, development and vocational preparation in studio practice and market-related art activities, art management and art education.

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  • Module content:

    Post/Modernities: Contemporary discourses
    This module investigates Modernism and Postmodernism as the dominant aesthetic, discursive and visual paradigms of the 20th and 21st centuries. Key concepts in these discourses and counter-discourses are highlighted and explored, such as the creation of modern subjectivity, the beautiful and the sublime, the avant garde, the metaphysics of presence, originality, authorship, hermeneutics, the “language turn”, différance and the so-called “end of art”. Theorist may include: Kant, Heidegger, Derrida and Foucault.

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Minimum credits: 120

Core modules

  • Module content:

    *Field of specialisation depends on approval by the head of department. Professional practice. During this module the student must function at a professional level in a specific area of the visual arts. Two-dimensional, three-dimensional, electronic media or any other applied visual arts field of study is researched at honours level and applied in practice.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    This module entails a study of critical approaches to and current discourses within fine arts, and the ability to contextualise contemporary and historical visual discourses within the international and local cultural and professional paradigms.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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