Yearbooks

Programme: BA Extended programme

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
01130014 Faculty of Humanities Duration of study: 4 years Total credits: 368

Programme information

This programme is directed at a general formative education in the humanities. It provides the student with a broad academic basis in order to continue with postgraduate studies and prepares the student for active involvement in a wide variety of career possibilities.

Additional requirements

Prospective students cannot apply for this study programme. The Faculty’s Admission Committee determines which students will be placed in this study programme. A limited number of places are available. Grade 12 applicants who have achieved an APS of 26-29 in Grade 11 will be considered for the BA (Extended programme), based on the results of the NBT.

Other programme-specific information

Students who are deemed to be at risk of their level of academic literacy are compelled to take ALL 110 and ALL 125.
Students who are deemed NOT to be at risk of their level of academic literacy are compelled to take language modules to the value of 12 credits from the list of language modules (see Academic literacy).

In addition to the prescribed fundamental modules, the curriculum should be compiled as follows:
Core/Elective modules:
First year of study
Select any 2 disciplines (subjects) at yr level 1 and do 2 semester modules from each of these disciplines plus 1 other module.

Second year of study
Select one discipline (subject) that you did in the first year and do both semesters at yr level 2.
Select any 2 additional disciplines at yr level 1 and do both semesters.

Third year of study
Select any 1 of the previous disciplines that you did at year level 1 and do it at yr level 2.
Select one of the disciplines that you did at yr level 2 and do it at yr level 3.

Fourth year of study
Select the other discipline that you did at yr level 2 and do it at yr level 3. Select any of the remaining modules you did at yr level 1 and do it at yr level 2.

The following general principles for combining disciplines in this programme prevail:

  • If a discipline (subject) does not offer two semester modules per year level, students should consult the departmental head of the particular discipline regarding potential supplementing with other relevant modules.
  • If any language disciplines (language subjects) are selected, the module choices that are prescribed in the language groups and in the alphabetical list of modules must be taken into account.
  • A few disciplines (subjects) from other faculties may be included in this programme but the following restrictions are applicable: only two of the four first-year subjects, one of the three second-year subjects, and one of the two third-year subjects may be selected from another faculty. Only the following disciplines from other faculties may be included in the programme:
    • Biblical and religious studies (REL)
    • Information science (INL)
    • Education (OPV)
    • Geography (GGY)
    • Consult the yearbook of the relevant faculty that offers these disciplines regarding the credit values, presentation modes and possible prerequisites.
  • In order to continue with postgraduate studies in a specific discipline, a student needs to do six semester modules in the discipline over the three years of study.

LANGUAGE GROUPS FOR SELECTION IN PROGRAMMES

Note: You should consult the alphabetical list of modules for full information on all the language modules listed below, as some of these modules have specific requirements/prerequisites.

Module group 1 – Afrikaans
Year level 1
• As a first language: AFR 110,120
• For speakers of other languages (also for speakers of other languages who are registered for qualifications in education and law) AFR 114
• For law students (first language): AFR 110 Note: AFR 120 may be taken additionally.
• For students following a programme in education: AFR 110,120; (first language); AFR 114 (speakers of other languages)

Year level 2
• As a first language: AFR 214, AFR 210,220
• For students following a programme in education: AFR 214, AFR 220
• Language, culture, communication and media: LCC 210,220

Year level 3
• As a first language: AFR 311,321
• For students following a programme in education: Any modules with alpha codes AFR and LCC offered at year level 3.
• Language, culture, communication and media: LCC 312,320,322

Module group 2 – English
Year level 1
• For special purposes: ENG 118
• For academic purposes: ENG 110,120

Year level 2
ENG 210,220

Year level 3
• ENG 310,320
• ENG 311,322

Module group 3 – French
Year level 1
• For beginners: FRN 104,181 (LLM students)
• Cultural-professional (for students who have passed French in Grade 12): FRN 113,123

Year level 2
FRN 211,221

Year level 3
Cultural-professional: FRN 361,362,363,364

Module group 4 – German
Year level 1
• For beginners: DTS 104
• Cultural-professional (for students who have passed German in Grade 12): DTS 113,123

Year level 2
DTS 211,221

Year level 3
Cultural-professional: DTS 361,362,363,364

Module group 5 – Greek
Year level 1
GRK 110,120

Year level 2
GRK 210,220

Module group 6 – Hebrew
Year level 1
HEB 110,120

Year level 2
HEB 210,220

Module group 7 – Latin
Year level 1
LAT 110,120 (students who passed Latin in Grade 12 may start immediately with Latin at year level 2)

Year level 2
LAT 210,220

Year level 3
LAT 310,320

Module group 8 – IsiNdebele
Year level 1
For speakers of isiNdebele as home language or first or second additional language
NDE 110, AFT 121

Year level 2
NDE 210, AFT 220

Year level 3
NDE 310, AFT 320

Module group 9 – IsiZulu
Year level 1
• For beginners: ZUL 110,120
• For speakers of isiZulu as home language or first or second additional language: ZUL 111, AFT 121

Year level 2
• For students who did ZUL 110,120 at year level 1: ZUL 210,220
• For students who did AFT 121: ZUL 111 at year level 1: AFT 220, ZUL 211

Year level 3
ZUL 310, AFT 320

Module group 10 – Sepedi
Year level 1
• For beginners: SEP 110,120
• For speakers of Sepedi as home language or first or second additional language: SEP 111, AFT 121

Year level 2
• For students who did SEP 110,120 at year level 1: SEP 210,220
• For students who did AFT 121, SEP 111 at year level 1: AFT 220, SEP 211

Year level 3
SEP 310, AFT 320

Module group 11 – Setswana
Year level 1
• For beginners: STW 110,120
• For speakers of Setswana as home language or first or second additional language: STW 111, AFT 121

Year level 2
• For students who did STW 110,120 at year level 1: STW 210,220
• For students who did AFT 121, STW 111 at year level 1: AFT 220, STW 211

Year level 3
STW 310, AFT 320

Module group 12 – Spanish
Year level 1
For beginners: SPN 101,102

Year level 2
SPN 211,221

Year level 3
SPN 311,321

Module group 13 – Portuguese
Year level 1
• For beginners: PTG 101
• Portuguese language and culture (for students who have passed Portuguese in Gr 12): PTG 113,123

Year level 2
PTG 211,221

Year level 3
PTG 311,321

Academic literacy
The academic literacy of all students who enrol at the University of Pretoria for the first time and all new students enrolling with the Faculty of Humanities for the first time will be assessed at the start of the academic year by means of their NSC marks.

  1. Students following a degree programme in English: The NSC Grade 12 English mark will be used to determine whether students in the Faculty of Humanities should register for the academic literacy modules (ALL 110 and ALL 125 in English):
  • Home Language: Students with a 4 or lower register for ALL 110 and ALL 125.
  • First Additional Language: Students with a 5 or lower register for ALL 110 and ALL 125.
  1. Students following a degree programme in Afrikaans: The NSC Grade 12 Afrikaans mark will be used to determine whether students in the Faculty of Humanities should register for the academic literacy modules (VAG 110 and VAG 125 in Afrikaans):
  • Home Language: Students with a 4 or lower register for VAG 110 and VAG 125.

All students in the Faculty of Humanities who are identified as being at risk in terms of their level of academic literacy, are compelled to obtain at least 12 credits in the academic literacy modules ALL 110 or VAG 110 and ALL 125 or VAG 125.
All students in the Faculty of Humanities who are not at risk in terms of their level of academic literacy, are compelled to obtain at least 12 credits in language modules:

Department of English
ENG 110 Introduction to literature in English (I) 
ENG 120 Introduction to literature in English (II) 
ENG 118 English for specific purposes 

Departement Afrikaans
AFR 110 Afrikaanse taalkunde en letterkunde 
AFR 120 Afrikaanse taalkunde en letterkunde 
AFR 114 Afrikaans vir sprekers van ander tale (I) 

Department of African Languages
NDE 110 Introduction to isiNdebele grammar – Capita selecta 
* Students who want to take isiNdebele in the second semester, should also register for AFT 121 (African languages literature: Capita selecta)
ZUL 110 IsiZulu for beginners 
ZUL 111 Introduction to isiZulu grammar – Capita selecta 
* Students want to take isiZulu in the second semester, should also register for AFT 121 (African languages literature: Capita selecta)
SEP 110 Sepedi for beginners 
SEP 111 Introduction to Sepedi Grammar – Capita selecta
* Students who want to take Sepedi in the second semester, should also register for AFT 121 (African languages literature: Capita selecta)
STW 110 Setswana for beginners
STW 111 Introduction to Setswana Grammar  – Capita selecta
*Students who want to take Setswana in the second semester, should also register for AFT 121 (African languages literature: Capita selecta)

Department of Modern European Languages
DTS 104 German for beginners 
DTS 113 German: Cultural-professional (1) *Prerequisite: Grade 12 German
FRN 104 French for beginners 
FRN 113 French: Cultural-professional (1) *Prerequisite: Grade 12 French
SPN 101 Spanish for beginners 
SPN 102 Spanish for beginners 
PTG 101 Portuguese for beginners

Department of Ancient Languages and Cultures
HEB 110 Hebrew 
LAT 110 Latin 
GRK 110 Greek

Promotion to next study year

  1. A student selected for the BA (Extended programme) must pass the following modules to the value of at least 50 credits at the end of the first year of study: fundamental modules of at least 26 credits as well as 1 subject at yr level 1 (all  consecutive modules of the same discipline – 24 credits).

The studies of students who do not comply with these requirements, will be cancelled and no readmission will be considered.

  1. Students in the BA (Extended programme) who passed all modules in the first year of study (80 credits), may apply for admission to the BA degree programme from the second year of study. Such an application must be accompanied by the necessary motivation. The Admissions Committee may approve the application of a student based on his/her academic performance.

Minimum credits: 80

Fundamental modules

Elective modules

  • Module content:

    *This module is only offered in Afrikaans

    Taalkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse taalkunde met klem op lees-en skryfvaardigheid. Letterkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse en Nederlandse letterkunde aan die hand van kortverhale en gedigte.

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    *This module is only offered in Afrikaans

    Taalkundekomponent: Inleiding tot die Afrikaanse sintaksis, fonetiek en taalgeskiedenis. Letterkundekomponent:Inleiding tot die Romankuns Inleiding tot die Drama

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    *Optional Field school usually in April
    Introduction to Archaeology
    An introduction as to how archaeologists study the past via the artefacts left behind by our ancestors. Basic introduction to archaeological theory and how it has contributed to interpretation of the past is discussed. Topics range from the origins of the human family in Africa over three million years ago to the study of more recent times.  

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    African and world archaeology
    Africa is the home of humanity in both a biological and cultural sense and we have the artefacts and sites to prove it. Topics range from the famous 3 million year-old Australopithecine ‘Lucy’ ancestor found in Ethiopia to the ‘Out of Africa’ dispersal of modern humans, and the emergence of human symbolism, rock art and the emergence of complex societies at society at Lake Chad (Daima) and southern Africa (Mapungubwe and Great Zimbabwe). The main aim is to situate events in Africa in global perspective. 

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    An introduction to the ancient world I: the ancient Near East
    Various facets of the ancient Mesopotamian, Syria-Palestinian and Egyptian cultures are dealt with in broad outline. Examples that are dealt with can include the following, namely geography, worldviews, history, literature, daily life, customs, values, religion and mythology. Examples of ancient cultures whose characteristics can be investigated range from the Sumerians, the Assyrians, the Babylonians, the Persians, the Canaanites, the Israelites and the Egyptians from their origin Before the Common Era to the beginning of the Common Era.

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    An introduction to the ancient world II: the Greek and Roman worlds
    Various facets of the ancient Greek and Roman cultures are dealt with in broad outline. Examples that are dealt with can include the following, namely geography, worldview, history, literature, daily life, customs, values, religion and mythology. These classical societies are investigated from their origin Before the Common Era into the Common Era.

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    Introduction to Anthropology
    This introduction to anthropology introduces basic themes of the discipline including ritual, religion, marriage and sex.  It combines classic studies with recent scholarship, and asks the 'big question' about human society and human cultures that offer challenging perspectives on the world we live in.

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    Small places, Large issues
    This module builds on the ethnographic and theoretical themes introduced in APL 110, asking particular questions about how we may think about the relationship between the local and the global; indigenous and universal; public and private; the real and the possible.

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    The languages of drama and film
    This module introduces the languages of drama and film as well as approaches to drama and film analysis. In addition, historical and contemporary drama and film theories will be used to read various drama and film texts.

    A & B: For students who enrolled for the BA Drama programme prior to 2016, as well as for students entering the BDram programme in 2016.

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    Drama and film genresThis module introduces the notion of genre as part of a wider concept of narrative building and storytelling in both drama and film. Different types of genre are introduced and discussed with regard to film and drama and furthermore linked to the idea of emerging identities in contemporary storytelling. All these parts are conceptually introduced and provide an introduction to reading, interpretation and giving meaning to various discourses in film and drama narratives.

     
    A & B: For students who enrolled for the BA Drama programme prior to 2016, as well as for students entering the BDram programme in 2016

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    *No previous knowledge of or experience in German required for admission. Students who passed grade 12 German are not allowed to register for this module
    An intensive introductory study of the German language focusing on the acquisition of basic communication skills, namely listening, reading, speaking and writing. It also offers a brief introduction to the culture of German-speaking countries.  This module complies with the requirements for level A2 set by the “Common European Framework of Reference for Languages”.

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  • Module content:

    Comprehensive review of German grammar; development of reading, writing, speaking and understanding skills; analysis and interpretation of tests.

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  • Module content:

    Continuation of comprehensive review of German; further development of reading, writing, speaking and understanding skills; analysis and interpretation of texts.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to the study of Heritage and Cultural Tourism; overview of South African resorts and nature conservation areas as tourist destinations within the broader context of heritage and cultural tourism. An introduction to the basic research skills in the HCT domain.

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    Archaeo-tourism
    Analysis of tourist and other visitations to archaeological sites. Topics cover international and local legislation, ethics and best practices debates on who interprets and who ‘owns’ the past and profits from it.  Also covered are site management plans, condition assessment and a consideration of the politics and ethics of ‘heritage’.  Case studies range from large UNESCO World Heritage Sites to small, almost forgotten ‘places of the past’ scattered across the globe.

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    *Alternative evening classes - 2 discussion classes per week Introduction to Literature in English (1) This module introduces the study of literature by examining a number of texts representing different genres (poetry, prose, drama). The texts studied here will be mainly from the pre-twentieth century era and may include texts written in English from both Africa and other parts of the world. The aim of this module is to equip students with the critical and analytical skills required for a perceptive reading of poetry, novels and plays.

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  • Module content:

    *Alternative evening classes: 2 discussion classes per week
    Introduction to Literature in English (2)
    This module introduces the study of post-nineteenth century literature by examining a number of texts representing different genres (poetry, drama, prose). Texts will be from both Africa and other parts of the world. By the end of this module students should have the background and analytical skills to perceptively read modern and contemporary poetry, novels and plays.

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    Introduction to Philosophy
    The two semester modules at first-year level introduce students to the four main subfields of Philosophy, namely epistemology and metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy. This module introduces students to two of these subfields. Students must contact the Department of Philosophy to ascertain which two subfields are covered in each semester as the choice may change from time to time due to availability of teaching staff. Students will become acquainted with the nature of philosophical reflection by exploring a number of classical philosophical themes in each subfield. Throughout the module there is an emphasis on developing those critical thinking, reading and writing skills that are required in Philosophy, while students become acquainted with the power of critique as critical judgment and discernment.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to Philosophy
    The two semester modules at first-year level introduce students to the four main subfields of Philosophy, namely epistemology and metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy. This module introduces students to two of these subfields. Students must contact the Department of Philosophy to ascertain which two subfields are covered in each semester as the choice may change from time to time due to availability of teaching staff. Students will become acquainted with the nature of philosophical reflection by exploring a number of classical philosophical themes in each subfield. Throughout the module there is an emphasis on developing those critical thinking, reading and writing skills that are required in Philosophy, while students become acquainted with the power of critique as critical judgment and discernment.

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  • Module content:

    *No previous knowledge of or experience in French required for admission. Students who passed grade 12 French are not allowed to register for this module.
    An intensive introductory study of the French language focusing on the acquisition of basic communication skills, namely listening, reading, speaking and writing. It also offers a brief introduction to the culture of French-speaking countries. This module complies with the requirements for level A2 set by the “Common European Framework of Reference for Languages”.

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  • Module content:

    Comprehensive review of French grammar; development of reading, writing, speaking and understanding skills; analysis and interpretation of texts.

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  • Module content:

    Comprehensive review of French grammar; further development of reading, writing, speaking and understanding skills; analysis and interpretation of texts.

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    The making of the Modern World: a survey
    A selection of themes on Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe and their contribution to the making of the Modern World.

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    Africa and South Africa: a survey
    An overview focusing on the making of African and South African societies from the earliest times to the present with emphasis on the most significant historical forces, factors and events.

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    This module begins by fostering an understanding of human geography. Then follows with the political ordering of space; cultural diversity as well as ethnic geography globally and locally; population geography of the world and South Africa: and four economic levels of development. The purpose is to place South Africa in a world setting and to understand the future of the country.

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    Investigating southern African landscapes and placing them in a theoretical and global context. The geomorphological evolution of southern Africa. Introduction to the concepts of Geomorphology and its relationships with other physical sciences (e.g. meteorology, climatology, geology, hydrology and biology). The processes and controls of landform and landscape evolution. Tutorial exercises cover basic techniques of geomorphological analysis, and topical issues in Geomorphology.

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    Greek grammar (1)
    The basic characteristics of Hellenistic Greek: the writing system and pronunciation, the Greek verb and noun systems, conjugation and declension, basic syntax and vocabulary. Passages from the Greek New Testament are adapted as exercises in order to facilitate linguistic proficiency. Continuous evaluation includes class tests and homework assignments.
    Greek grammar (2)
    Further study of the verb and noun systems of Hellenistic Greek, expansion of the basic vocabulary, and analysis of compound sentences. Adapted passages from the New Testament form the core of practical academic literacy exercises.

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    Greek grammar (3)
    Further study of the verb and noun systems of Hellenistic Greek: middle and passive forms, the third declension, and analysis of compound sentences. Adapted passages from the New Testament form the core of practical academic literacy exercises.
    Greek texts: Read and comprehend
    Read selected texts from the NT and/or Apostolic Fathers, with emphasis on word analysis, basic translation, use of basic aids (dictionary, translations). Evaluation includes translation of unseen passages from the corpuses concerned.

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    Hebrew grammar (1)
    Basic principles of the grammar of classical Hebrew: signs of writing and pronunciation, Hebrew morphology, the nominal and verbal system, basic syntax and vocabulary. Exercise basic competence by means of the analysis and translation of selected passages from the Hebrew Old Testament.
    Hebrew grammar (2)
    More advanced principles of the grammar of classical Hebrew: the function of nouns, verbs and particles, the derived formations of the verb. Passages from the Hebrew Old Testament from the basis for exercising academic literacy.

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  • Module content:

    Hebrew grammar (3)
    Continued study of the Hebrew verbal system: the irregular and weak verbs. Passages from the Hebrew Old Testament from the basis for students’ exercise in academic literacy.
    Hebrew texts: Read and comprehend
    Read selected texts from the OT, with emphasis on word analysis, basic translation, use of basic aids (dictionary, translations). Evaluation includes translation of unseen passages.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Fundamental criminology
    Introduction to criminology, definition of crime, crime tendencies, classical and positivistic explanations of crime.
    Part 2: Violent crime
    A brief analysis of causes, consequences and mechanisms to prevent and reduce violent crime within a South African context. Define violent crime in terms of interpersonal violence, homicide, violent crimes within the criminal justice system and property-related violent crimes.

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    Part 1: Penology
    In Penology attention is given to the criminal justice system to emphasise the importance of using an integrated approach in the handling of offenders.  The impact of overpopulation in prisons is critically evaluated. Attention is also given to awaiting trial offenders, the importance of community-based sentences as well as the re-integration of offenders in the community.
    Part 2: Crime prevention and control
    Responsibilities of the police and the community in crime prevention and control. Primary, secondary and tertiary crime prevention, crime prevention and reduction strategies in South Africa.

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  • Module content:

    *Not for students who passed Latin in Gr 12
    Latin grammar and reading (1) and (2)
    Basic characteristics and use of classical Latin: the verb and noun in Latin (conjugation and declension), basic syntax, as well as vocabulary; exercises in grammar and reading; relevant social, political and historical background.
    Continued study of accidence and syntax; further basic vocabulary. More adapted Latin passages to facilitate academic literacy.

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  • Module content:

    *Not for students who passed Latin in Gr 12
    Latin grammar and reading (3) and (4)
    Continued study of accidence and syntax: further basic vocabulary. More adapted Latin passages to facilitate academic literacy.
    The student’s knowledge and understanding of Latin accidence, syntax and vocabulary is extended further. The emphasis is now more on reading passages and analysing them grammatically and syntactically.

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    Part 1: Developmental social work
    The origin and nature, of social welfare and social work from a national and international perspective. Socio-economic problems, target groups, specialised fields, intervention levels (individual, family, group and community), service providers and role players in the South African context.  Developmental social welfare; principles, values, goal and functions of social work within a developmental perspective.  Cultural sensitive social work practice.
    Part 2: Social work intervention: Community
    Nature and characteristics of social work intervention with communities; exploration of the components of communities and community work; the value of ecosystems theory in community work; composition of a community profile and the principles of social work services to communities  to enhance community participation
    Part 3: Social work intervention: Community
    Nature and characteristics of social work intervention with communities; exploration of the components of communities and community work; the value of the ecosystems and strengths perspective theory in community work; composition of a community profile and the principles of social work services to communities to enhance community mobilisation and participation.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Social work intervention: Individual and group
    Characteristic features of the helping relationship; the communication process; basic interpersonal skills and exploring skills in social work intervention with individuals. Different types of groups; group dynamics; leadership and basic skills for group leaders in social work intervention with groups.
    Part 2: Family development and assistance
    Families: The life cycle of the family, tasks and behaviour of the members of the family. The focus is on the social, economic, religious and cultural diversity of families and causes of family disorganisation.

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    For speakers of isiNdebele as home language or first or second additional language.
    Aspects of the grammar of isiNdebele such as an introduction to the word categories; an introduction to the structure, meaning and use of the noun, the adjective, the relative, the possessive; the verb; writing and spelling rules; dictionaries and dictionary use; grammatical analysis.

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  • Module content:

    *For absolute beginners only.
    *Only students from the School of Healthcare Sciences may take this module during semester 2. All other students must  take this module during semester 1. Also note that students from the School of Healthcare Sciences, who already possess the language skills taught in this module, may write an exemption examination.
    The acquisition of basic Sepedi communicative skills with emphasis on everyday expressions and suitable high frequency vocabulary, within specific social situations.

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  • Module content:

    Sepedi - communication and grammar
    The acquisition of more advanced communication skills in further social situations. More extensive vocabulary and more advanced language structures are acquired and used. Further awareness of the nature and function of language structures. Writing and spelling rules. Dictionaries and dictionary use. Reading and comprehension of basic texts.

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  • Module content:

    This module is a general orientation to Psychology. An introduction is given to various theoretical approaches in Psychology, and the development of Psychology as a science is discussed. Selected themes from everyday life are explored and integrated with psychological principles. This module focuses on major personality theories. An introduction is given to various paradigmatic approaches in Psychology.

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    This module introduces the student to a basic knowledge and understanding of the biological basis of human behaviour. The module addresses the key concepts and terminology related to the biological subsystem, the rules and principles guiding biological psychology, and identification of the interrelatedness of different biological systems and subsystems. In this module various cognitive processes are studied, including perception, memory, thinking, intelligence and creativity. Illustrations are given of various thinking processes, such as problem solving, critical, analytic and integrative thinking.

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    Part 1: The individual and society
    An introduction to sociology, the classical sociological paradigm and the principles of sociological research.

    Part 2: The making of the South African order

    This section explores key factors involved in the making and shaping of the contemporary South African social order and considers the sociological implications thereof. Students will be introduced to the political economy of South Africa, with an emphasis on the nature of South Africa’s industrialisation, the process of proletarianisation and the introduction of the migration labour system. In addition, the racial state, the foundations of its social project, and the spatial form of its 20th century racial modernity will be considered.

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    Part 1: The sociology of institutions
    An introduction to the social dynamics of institutions such as the family, the state, the economy, religion, education, and civil society, with specific focus on Southern Africa.

    Part 2: Social stratification: Race, class and gender
    The nature and dynamics of social stratification and inequality will be explored. Race, gender and class are the foci of the section. The South African reality in this regard is highlighted.

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    *No previous knowledge of Spanish is required. Please note: Students with an advanced knowledge of Spanish (e.g. levels B1, B2 or higher) are not allowed to register for this module.
    An introductory study of the Spanish language focusing on the acquisition of basic communication skills, namely listening, reading, speaking and writing. It also offers a brief introduction to the culture of Spanish-speaking countries. This module complies with the requirements for level A set by the “Common European Framework of Reference for Languages”.

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  • Module content:

    * For absolute beginners only.

    The acquisition of basic Setswana communicative skills with emphasis on everyday expressions and suitable high frequency vocabulary with specific social situations.
     

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    Setswana – communication and grammar
    The acquisition of more advanced communication skills in further social situations. More extensive vocabulary and more advanced language structures are acquired and used. Further awareness of the nature and function of language structures. Writing and spelling rules. Dictionaries and dictionary use. Reading and comprehension of basic texts.

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  • Module content:

    An introduction to the climate and general seasonal climatic circulation patterns of Southern Africa. Basic weather types and weather processes within the Southern African context. Interpretation of synoptic maps and synoptic station reports. Impacts of climate change and extreme climate events on society.
    *BSc (Geography) and BSc (Environmental Sciences) students may register for WKD 155. Students are not allowed to earn credits for both WKD 155 and WKD 164.

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  • Module content:

    *For absolute beginners only
    *Only students from the School of Healthcare Sciences may take this module during semester 2. All other students must take this module during semester 1. Students from the School of Healthcare Sciences, who already possess the language skills taught in this module, may write an exemption examination.
    The acquisition of basic isiZulu communicative skills with emphasis on everyday expressions and suitable high frequency vocabulary, within specific situations.

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  • Module content:

    isiZulu - communication and grammar
    The acquisition of more advanced communication skills in further social situations. More extensive vocabulary and more advanced language structures are acquired and used. Further awareness of the nature and function of language structures. Writing and spelling rules. Dictionaries and dictionary use. Reading and comprehension of basic texts

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  • Module content:

    In this module students are guided to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes with regard to the political, professional, historical and cultural complexities of teaching.  Selected themes in the history of South African education will be explored to enable students to think critically about their role as engaged professional educators today.

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  • Module content:

    This module focuses on child development and learning. In addition to the underlying principles of developmental psychology and theories of development, child development is discussed in terms of physical growth and motor development; development of perception, cognition and language; emotional development; social development and moral development. Developmental psychopathology is also introduced. In terms of child learning, the principles of learning, theories of learning and barriers to learning are discussed. In addition, school learning is explained in terms of learning, reading and study skills.

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    Foundations of visual culture
    This module introduces art and visual culture theory using a wide range of texts and ideas. The module gives students wide exposure to visual discourses and includes a variety of visual culture examples e.g. artworks, advertisements. These discourses may include:  exploring what visual culture is; modes of analysis; introducing terminology such as ideology and myth; dealing with selected periods from history contextually; introducing cultural icons and themes from popular visual culture.

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    Images across media: current issues
    This module presents an introduction into the ways in which images appear across media in contemporary visual culture from a specific African perspective within the global. This is done by means of exploring key modes, themes, genres, platforms and visual texts. Among the media and mediums that may be covered are photography, art, graphic design, advertising, film, documentaries, video, digital and social media. 

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    Images across media: historical perspectives

    This module presents a historical overview of the ways in which images have appeared across media in visual culture from a specific African vantage point within the global. This is done by means of exploring key modes, themes and visual texts with the aim of fostering an understanding of how historical events and cultural and ideological trends underpin the visual. Among the topics that may be covered are the progression of graphic and industrial design from the Industrial Revolution, photography, art, fashion, dress, magazines, printed culture and postcards. The module also provides an introduction to research approaches and methods in the field of visual culture. 

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    Introducing the basic concepts and interrelationships required to understand the complexity of natural environmental problems, physical and human environment, human induced environmental problems, the ways in which the natural environment affects human society and biodiversity, an introduction to major environmental issues in Southern Africa and sustainable development in the context of environmental issues.

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    Aspects of the literature of isiNdebele/isiZulu/Sepedi/Setswana such as an introduction to literary concepts such as literary text(s), topic, characters, events, time and place; the analysis of selected short stories.

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    This module is intended to equip students with a thorough knowledge of English grammar and is particularly useful for those interested in a career in teaching, editing, document design or other forms of language practice.

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    *For speakers of Sepedi as home language or first or second additional language.
    Aspects of the grammar of Sepedi such as an introduction to the word categories; an introduction to the structure, meaning and use of the noun, the adjective, the relative, the possessive; the verb; writing and spelling rules; dictionaries and dictionary use; grammatical analysis.

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    *For speakers of isiZulu as home language or first or second additional language.
    Aspects of the grammar of isiZulu such as an introduction to the word categories; an introduction to the structure, meaning and use of the noun, the adjective, the relative, the possessive; the verb; writing and spelling rules; dictionaries and dictionary use; grammatical analysis.

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    The world of religion
    What is religion? The functions of religion. Studying religion. Perspectives on religion. Common concepts and key terms in various religions will be dealt with - also generic dimensions and aspects.  The interdependence of religion, culture and society.

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    Kaleidoscope of religions
    The occurrence of religion in societies. Types of religion. Primal religions. Christianity, Judaism, Islam.  A variety of religions will be addressed: capita selecta will be made from Christianity; Hinduism; Buddhism; New Religions; New Age; main developments in the world and South Africa.

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    This module offers an intensive study of the Portuguese language focusing on the acquisition of basic communication skills: listening. reading, speaking and writing. It also offers a brief introduction to Lusophone culture. This module complies with the requirements for level A set by the "Common European Framework of Reference for Languages".

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    This module involves a comprehensive review of Portuguese grammar, the development of reading, writing, speaking and understanding skills and the analysis and interpretation of texts.

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  • Module content:

    This module involves the continuation of the comprehensive review of Portuguese grammar begun in PTG 113 and further development of reading, writing, speaking and understanding skills as well as the analysis and interpretation of texts. This module offers an introduction to Portuguese literature from Portugal, Africa and Latin America.

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    This module is a broad introduction to sport and recreation as products in the market. Students discover the nature of sport and recreation, the difference between the concepts and policies, plans, strategies and structures of sport and recreation in South Africa and Zone VI in Africa. The dynamic scope and nature of recreation and sports management are introduced and discussed. Emphasis is placed on basic management tasks and functions in sport and recreation contexts, interpersonal skills, leadership and control systems and techniques in sport and recreation. The module establishes a foundation of management knowledge and skills on which subsequent sport and recreation management modules are built.

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    This module explores the difference between sports and recreation management and leadership and their application in sport and recreation. Selected classic and modern management and leadership theories are identified, described and compared in sport and recreation contexts. Students are guided towards selecting and demonstrating appropriate leadership styles and skills related to cross-cultural sport and recreation situations. Emphasis is placed on building leadership capacity through sport and recreation. This module establishes leadership competencies and confidence for subsequent academic service learning and community engagement activities.

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    This module identifies, defines and examines the underlying theoretical dimensions and practical principles of scientific sports coaching to provide a platform for subsequent knowledge and application in sports coaching contexts.

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    This module builds on the fundamental priciples of sports coaching. It focuses on the processes and techniques of learning and teaching of skills within a sports paradigm. Methodological techniques as implemented by the coach in teaching and learning of sports skills are identified, discussed and applied. In this module the student gets the opportunity to obtain a Level 0/1 Sports Coaching certificate in a sport of choice.

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    This module provides a strong underpinning to the theoretical concepts of recreation and leisure in societies. Foundatios of recreation and leisure, the multifaceted delivery systems and diverse service areas of recreation are identified, characterised and discussed in contemporary contexts. The power, promise, potential and possibilities of recreation and leisure in society are explained and illustrated practically. In this module students obtain an accredited community recreation leadership certificate to provide a foundation for subsequent community engagement and academic service learning components.

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    In this module the role and function of sport as a social phenomenon in society are discussed and explored from different perspectives. Contemporary issues and controversies within the world of sport are unpacked to equip students to recognise and contribute to discourses in the globalised world of sport. 

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    In this module basic principles of sport, exercise and performance psychology are identified as basis for subsequent modules. Fundamental principles of motivation, activation, attention, personality and aggression and their role in sport, exercise and performance are identified, defined and discussed in divese sport contexts. 

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    This module introduces the basic principles, dynamics and skills involved in the psychology of sport coaching. Different roles of the coach as leader, motivator, facilitator and communicator are identified and explained from a psychological perspective. In this module the psychological principles constituting the development of children through sport and coaching will be explored and interpreted. The growth principles will be integrated with all the different life phases.

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    Please note: Students with an advanced knowledge of Spanish (e.g. levels B1, B2 or higher) are not allowed to register for this module.

    An intensive introductory study of the Spanish language focusing on the acquisition of basic communication skills, namely listening, reading, speaking and writing. It also offers a brief introduction to the culture of Spanish-speaking countries. This module complies with the requirements for level A2 set by the "Common European Framework for Reference for Languages."

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    *For speakers of Setswana as home language or first or second additional language. Aspects of the grammar of Setswana such as an introduction to the word categories; an introduction to the structure, meaning and use of the noun, the adjective, the relative, the possessive; the verb; writing and spelling rules; dictionaries and dictionary use; grammatical analysis.

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    An introduction to the study of organised political society at national and international levels with specific reference to political concepts, approaches and methods. The emphasis is on state and governance as frameworks for analysis in light of the salient changes brought about at national and international levels by globalisation. Attention is paid to the corresponding dynamics of regime development, performance and change at national and international levels considering increasing challenges to national sovereignty from within and without states in a context of a growing global agenda dealing with transnational issues and challenges, such as the environment, human rights, development and humanitarian intervention.

     

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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