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Programme: BIS Information Science

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
12131004 Faculty of Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology Duration of study: 3 years Total credits: 423
Contact:
Dr MA Holmner
[email protected]
+27 (0)124205215

Programme information

The increasing amount of information available and developing information needs have necessitated the training of information intermediaries to effectively facilitate the bringing together of users and the information they require.

This package focuses on the use of information technology and the processing of information products and is designed to train students in the management, retrieval and organisation of information, as well as to teach them how to add value to, package and distribute information. Students will also have the opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in the management of one of the most important resources of enterprises – information and knowledge. Two or three specialisation options are available, depending on the electives chosen.

Admission requirements

  • In order to register NSC/IEB/Cambridge candidates must comply with the minimum requirements for degree studies as well as with the minimum requirements for the relevant study programme.
  • Life Orientation is excluded when calculating the APS.
  • Grade 11 results are used in the provisional admission of prospective students.
  • A valid National Senior Certificate (NSC) with admission to degree studies is required.
  • Minimum subject and achievement requirements as set out below are required. On first-year level a student has a choice between Afrikaans and English as language medium. In certain cases tuition may be presented in English only for example in electives where the lecturer may not speak Afrikaans or in cases where it is not economically or practically viable.
  • Provisional admission to the four-year programme in the School of Engineering is only guaranteed if a prospective student complies with ALL the requirements below.
Note
 
Candidates who do not comply with the minimum requirements, set out above, but who have obtained a minimum APS of 30, an achievement level of 5 for English or Afrikaans, 6 for Mathematics and 5 for Physical Science, will be considered for provisional admission to either the four-year programme or the ENGAGE programme based on the results of the compulsory NBT.
 
Admission to ENGAGE in the School of Engineering will be determined by the results of the NBT, NSC results, an achievement level of 5 in Mathematics and 4 in Physical Science, as well as an achievement level of 4 in Afrikaans or English, together with an APS of 25.
 
Students may apply directly to be considered for the ENGAGE programme.
 
Minimum requirements for 2016
Achievement level
Afrikaans or English APS
NSC/IEB HIGCSE AS-Level A-Level
4 3 D D

28

(25-27

admission 

based on the 

NBT)

 
Should a candidate obtain an APS of 25 to 27 consideration for admission will be based on the results of the NBT provided the quotas regarding student numbers have not been reached. If informatics is selected at first-year level an achievement level of 5 is required in Mathematics.
 

 

Other programme-specific information

Because credits are not calculated in the same way in all faculties, students should ensure note that the total number of credits required for this package is at least 415-458 depending on the choice of elective modules (as required for Group A, B or C).

Please Note:

Because credits are not calculated in the same way in all faculties, students should take note that the total number of credits required for Group A is at least 70 and 90 for Groups B and C.

1. A candidate who has obtained at least 4 (50-59%) in Mathematics in the Grade 12 examination, or at least 50% in both WTW 133 and WTW 143 will be admitted to Informatics 112;

2. A candidate who has obtained at least 5 (60-69%) in Mathematics, or has passed WTW 133 and WTW 143, will be admitted to Informatics, 154, 164 and 171.

3. Prerequisite for INF is at least level 5 (60-69%) in Mathematics in the Grade 12 examination or WTW 101 or (WTW 133 and WTW 143) as well as the module prerequisites.

Minimum credits: 110

Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    This module is an introduction to the study field of information science and its various professions. Key concepts that will be discussed include the following: the human as information processor and user; the life-cycle of information in terms of processes, products and role-players; as well as the communication of information. The social-ethical impact of globalisation is included as a key concern, with reference to Africa.

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  • Module content:

    Organisation and representation of information. This module provides the student with an introduction to the basic principles and processes underlying the organisation and representation of information. The process of organising information in documents and on the web, in multimedia formats, by means of document image processing and in databases are dealt with. Themes on the representation of information through the creation of metadata include various general and domain specific metadata schemas such as Dublin Core as a metadata standard for the Web, as well as various other metadata schemas.
    Practical classes include basic HTML and the design of Web pages incorporating and applying what was covered in theory.

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  • Module content:

    Personal information management. This module focuses on personal information management within an organisational context. It deals with managing information and knowledge that is peculiar to an individual and which enables him/her to perform his/her job.
    Topics include: creating an environment in which the individual can manage his/her information and knowledge; the skills needed to be able to manage personal information and knowledge; information overloading which gives rise to personal information and knowledge management, as well as the manner in which individuals can switch from personal information management to personal knowledge management; personal information and knowledge management as a career.

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  • Module content:

    Information and communication technology. This module offers a brief overview of hardware and software, telecommunications technology, LANs, WANs and intranets, the information highway, the internet and the World Wide Web, computer ethics, ICTs, e-commerce, mobile computing technology and the influence that new trends and developments have on the distribution of information.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to business management as a science; the environment in which the enterprise operates; the field of business, the mission and goals of an enterprise; management and entrepreneurship. The choice of a form of enterprise; the choice of products and/or services; profit and cost planning for different sizes of operating units; the choice of location; the nature of production processes and the layout of the plant or operating unit.
    Introduction to and overview of general management, especially regarding the five management tasks: strategic management; contemporary developments and management issues; financial management; marketing and public relations. Introduction to and overview of the value chain model; management of the input; management of the purchasing function; management of the transformation process with specific reference to production and operations management; human resources management and information management; corporate governance and black economic empowerment (BEE).

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  • Module content:

    Responsible leadership and the role of a business in society. The nature and development of entrepreneurship; the individual entrepreneur and characteristics of South African entrepreneurs. Looking at the window of opportunity. Getting started (business start up). Exploring different routes to entrepreneurship: entering a family business, buying a franchise, home-based business and the business buyout. This semester also covers how entrepreneurs can network and find support in their environments. Case studies of successful entrepreneurs - also South African entrepreneurs - are studied.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Introduction to industrial and organisational psychology
    This section is an introduction to the various schools of thought in psychology with particular emphasis on industrial and organisational psychology and its fields of application. The basic principles of scientifically systematising industrial psychological knowledge will be discussed. The biological basis of behaviour will be addressed in order to lay the foundation for the application of ergonomical principles.
    Individual processes
    This section consists of the principles of learning as found in the work context. The role of perception in the work environment will be discussed by considering aspects such as shape, depth, distance and colour perceptions. Cognition, thought, reasoning, memory, creativity and decision-making will be included. Intelligence will be addressed and placed in an Industrial and organisational psychology perspective.

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  • Module content:

    Development and personality
    This module consists of a discussion of the life span and important periods in human development with emphasis on their meaning in the work context. With regard to personality, the following themes will be addressed: the cultural context of personality, its formation and determinants of personality; personality as determinant of behaviour as well as the development and maintenance of self-image. Attention will be given to the basic methods of personality measuring and personality assessment.
    Man in interaction
    This theme deals with some central aspects in human interaction.  These aspects should be known and understood by prospective human resource management practitioners and Industrial Psychologists, as they are acknowledged as human behaviour specialists in the work context who can assist employers/organisations to enhance the performance, productivity and wellness of human resources in the workplace.  Effective human interaction plays a pivotal role in this environment.  Thus this module covers aspects like the self-concept, social roles, social perception, time structuring and management, motivation and frustration and psychological adaptation processes and how it relates to human interaction in general and with reference to the workplace.  Both theory and practical implications are covered.

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  • Module content:

    Principles of marketing management and marketing instruments, customer centricity,  the process of marketing management, market segmentation, positioning and marketing information systems, environmental analysis, identification of target markets, value creation, positioning strategies, consumer behaviour, relationship marketing, relationship intention, application of product, price, marketing communication and distribution strategies.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to information systems, information systems in organisations, hardware: input, processing, output, software: systems and application software, organisation of data and information, telecommunications and networks, the Internet and Intranet. Transaction processing systems, management information systems, decision support systems, information systems in business and society, systems analysis, systems design, implementation, maintenance and revision.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to programming.

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  • Module content:

    Advanced programming, use of a computer-aided software engineering tool.

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  • Module content:

    *Module content will be adapted in accordance with the appropriate degree programme. Only one of KOB 181 - 184 may be taken as a module where necessary for a programme.
    Applied business communication skills.
    Acquiring basic business communication skills will enhance the capabilities of employees, managers and leaders in the business environment. An overview of applied skills on the intrapersonal, dyadic, interpersonal, group (team), organisational, public and mass communication contexts is provided. The practical part of the module (for example, the writing of business reports and presentation skills) concentrates on the performance dimensions of these skills as applied to particular professions.

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  • Module content:

    *Module content will be adapted in accordance with the appropriate degree programme. Only one of KOB 181 - 184 may be taken as a module where necessary for a programme.
    Applied business communication skills.
    Acquiring basic business communication skills will enhance the capabilities of employees, managers and leaders in the business environment. An overview of applied skills on the intrapersonal, dyadic, interpersonal, group (team), organisational, public and mass communication contexts is provided. The practical part of the module (for example, the writing of business reports and presentation skills) concentrates on the performance dimensions of these skills as applied to particular professions.

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  • Module content:

    *Module content will be adapted in accordance with the appropriate degree programme. Only one of KOB 181 - 184 may be taken as a module where necessary for a programme.
    Applied business communication skills.
    Acquiring basic business communication skills will enhance the capabilities of employees, managers and leaders in the business environment. An overview of applied skills on the intrapersonal, dyadic, interpersonal, group (team), organisational, public and mass communication contexts is provided. The practical part of the module (for example, the writing of business reports and presentation skills) concentrates on the performance dimensions of these skills as applied to particular professions.

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  • Module content:

    *Module content will be adapted in accordance with the appropriate degree programme. Only one of KOB 181 - 184 may be taken as a module where necessary for a programme.
    Applied business communication skills.
    Acquiring basic business communication skills will enhance the capabilities of employees, managers and leaders in the business environment. An overview of applied skills on the intrapersonal, dyadic, interpersonal, group (team), organisational, public and mass communication contexts is provided. The practical part of the module (for example, the writing of business reports and presentation skills) concentrates on the performance dimensions of these skills as applied to particular professions.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Fundamental criminology
    Introduction to criminology, definition of crime, crime tendencies, classical and positivistic explanations of crime.
    Part 2: Violent crime
    A brief analysis of causes, consequences and mechanisms to prevent and reduce violent crime within a South African context. Define violent crime in terms of interpersonal violence, homicide, violent crimes within the criminal justice system and property-related violent crimes.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Penology
    In Penology attention is given to the criminal justice system to emphasise the importance of using an integrated approach in the handling of offenders.  The impact of overpopulation in prisons is critically evaluated. Attention is also given to awaiting trial offenders, the importance of community-based sentences as well as the re-integration of offenders in the community.
    Part 2: Crime prevention and control
    Responsibilities of the police and the community in crime prevention and control. Primary, secondary and tertiary crime prevention, crime prevention and reduction strategies in South Africa.

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  • Module content:

    Basics of politics
    An introduction to the study of organised political society at national and international levels with specific reference to political concepts, approaches and methods. The emphasis is on state and governance as frameworks for analysis. This includes the development and comparison of related political entities, processes and regime types of a democratic and non-democratic nature, also considering the salient changes brought about by globalisation.

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  • Module content:

    Cooperation in the political world
    An introduction to cooperation at national and international levels with specific reference to the nature, foundations and politics of cooperation. This includes an analysis and comparison of the politicisation, localisation and internationalisation of issues and of the problems at national, regional and international levels related to cooperation in an increasingly interdependent world characterised by the absence of supranational institutions. Attention is also paid to the corresponding dynamics of regime development, performance and change.

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  • Module content:

    This module is a general orientation to Psychology. An introduction is given to various theoretical approaches in Psychology, and the development of Psychology as a science is discussed. Selected themes from everyday life are explored and integrated with psychological principles. This module focuses on major personality theories. An introduction is given to various paradigmatic approaches in Psychology.

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  • Module content:

    This module introduces the student to a basic knowledge and understanding of the biological basis of human behaviour. The module addresses the key concepts and terminology related to the biological subsystem, the rules and principles guiding biological psychology, and identification of the interrelatedness of different biological systems and subsystems. In this module various cognitive processes are studied, including perception, memory, thinking, intelligence and creativity. Illustrations are given of various thinking processes, such as problem solving, critical, analytic and integrative thinking.

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  • Module content:

    This module in public administration is designed specifically to assist students in understanding the role of public administration in a modern state, the unique characteristics of public administration, the schools and approaches in public administration and introducing the various generic administrative functions. The discipline of public administration has developed rapidly and by implication, has changed and shifted its paradigm over the years. The purpose of this module is to introduce public administration to the student as a field of study that makes a significant contribution to the effective administration and management of government institutions.

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  • Module content:

    This module in public administration will introduce the constitutional framework pertaining to public administration. The South African system of government, the functions, role and powers of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of government as well as the functioning of the three spheres of government will be discussed. The module will enable the student to understand how and where public administration is practiced.

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  • Module content:

    E-marketing, services marketing, not-for-profit marketing, business-to-business marketing, retailing, global marketing.

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  • Module content:

    General systems theory, creative problem solving, soft systems methodology. The systems analyst, systems development building blocks, systems development, systems analysis methods, process modelling.

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Minimum credits: 160

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Information seeking and retrieval. This module explores the theory and practice of effective information seeking and retrieval. It builds on supporting research paradigms such as the systems, user-centred, cognitive and socio-cognitive paradigms. The focus is on the complexities of effective information seeking and retrieval within the context of information behaviour on a personal level, as well as in the context of professional, academic or everyday information needs.

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  • Module content:

    Representation and organisation. Information needs to be represented and organised in a system for it to be effectively retrievable. This module deals with the representation and organisation of information on the level of individual entities (e.g. indexing), from the perspective of the users (user profiling), as well as within a document collection (taxonomies and ontologies).

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  • Module content:

    Social and ethical impact. This module examines moral and legal regulation practices related to information in print and digital environments. Different ethical theories are identified and applied to privacy, access to information, information poverty and censorship. The interpretation and enforcement of rules and regulations are discussed.

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  • Module content:

    This project-orientated module is a form of applied learning which is directed at specific community needs and is integrated into all undergraduate academic programmes offered by the Faculty of Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology. 
    The main objectives with the module are as follows:
    (1) The execution of a community-related project aimed at achieving a beneficial impact on a chosen section of society, preferably but not exclusively, by engagement with a section of society which is different from the student's own background.
    (2) The development of an awareness of personal, social and cultural values, an attitude to be of service, and an understanding of social issues, for the purpose of being a responsible professional.
    (3) The development of important multidisciplinary and life skills, such as communication, interpersonal and leadership skills.
    Assessment in this module will include all or most of the following components: evaluation and approval of the project proposal, assessment of oral and/or written progress reports, peer assessment in the event of team projects, written report-back by those at which the project was aimed at, and final assessment on grounds of the submission of a portfolio and a written report.

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  • Module content:

    Management communication
    Based on the paradigm of Integrated Communication (IC), this module covers management communication theory, leadership and supervisory communication, as well as the management of change and transformation through communication. Management communication in the global arena focuses on the dynamics and celebration of diversity and intercultural relations. Managers should take cognisance of the importance of development communication in both a business and community context. The importance of ethical considerations in managerial and leadership communication is emphasised. After explaining quantitative and qualitative research designs, appropriate communication research techniques are explored.

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  • Module content:

    Organisational communication management
    Through the utilisation of organisational communication management theories, a study is made of group and team communication, with specific emphasis on facilitation, negotiation and innovation. Knowledge management, internal communication, culture and organisational climate are core components of the complex dynamics of the sharing of meaning within the organisation. The function of strategic communication is emphasised throughout. Ethical considerations in organisational communication management are also stressed and appropriate research techniques are presented.

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  • Module content:

    Logistics management
    The role of logistics in an enterprise; definition and scope of customer service; electronic and other logistics information systems; inventory management; materials management with special reference to Japanese systems; management of the supply chain. Methods of transport and transport costs; types and costs of warehousing; electronic aids in materials handling; cost and price determination of purchases; organising for logistics management; methods for improving logistics performance.

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  • Module content:

    Project management: Introduction
    Project management concepts; needs identification; the project, the project manager and the project team; types of project organisations; project communication and documentation.
    Planning and control: planning, scheduling and schedule control of projects; resource considerations and allocations; cost planning and performance evaluation.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Database design: the relational model, structured query language (SQL), entity relationship modelling, normalisation, database development life cycle; practical introduction to database design. Databases: advanced entity relationship modelling and normalisation, object-oriented databases, database development life cycle, advanced practical database design.

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  • Module content:

    An overview of systems infrastructure and integration.

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  • Module content:

    Database management: transaction management, concurrent processes, recovery, database administration: new developments: distributed databases, client-server databases: practical implementation of databases.

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  • Module content:

    Systems analysis. Systems design: construction; application architecture; input design; output design; interface design; internal controls; program design; object design; project management; system implementation; use of computer-aided development tools.

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  • Module content:

    Use of computer-aided development tools; advanced programming.

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  • Module content:

    User studies and dissemination. This module focuses on the individual as seeker, user, reader and communicator of information. Various user groups are identified and their information use and communication patterns and requirements are analysed and investigated. This module covers methods of service provision to facilitate and enhance the use and dissemination of information in accordance with the user's needs.

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  • Module content:

    Economics and politics of information. This module examines the economics and politics of information, with a special emphasis on South Africa's information sector. It aims to promote an understanding of the market and non-market qualities of information, and their consequences for the production, distribution and marketing of information goods and services. The ways in which information access and expression are regulated and the use of ICTs in crime and corruption is also addressed.

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  • Module content:

    Indigenous knowledge and communication. This module focuses on the role and function of Indigenous Knowledge (IK) in the information and knowledge society. Various categories and contexts of IK are explored within international and local perspectives.
    Issues pertaining to access and communication of IK, inter alia through Information and Communication Technology (ICT), are addressed in order to ensure sustainable development.

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Minimum credits: 145

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Information Organisation. The module is concerned with the organisation of information in the digital environment focusing on the structure and use of document management and workflow systems, as well as distribution channels and virtual environments. The characteristics and application of the internet, intranets, as well as portals and applications use, are considered.

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  • Module content:

    Information and Knowledge Management. This module focuses on information and knowledge management at an operational level and introduces information and knowledge management at a corporate strategic level. It deals with the management of information and knowledge, which enables the organisation to be competitive. In this module the focus is on four aspects, namely: the 21st century organisation, the external and internal stakeholders that have an interest in information products, as well as the infrastructure that should be in place in organisations to manage information products. The module concludes with a few topics relating to information management at a corporate strategic level.

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  • Module content:

    Experiential learning project. This module takes the form of a project and experiential training in co-operation with industry.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    A review of current trends which are relevant to the application of information systems within a business environment.

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  • Module content:

    Information systems in organisations, social and ethical responsibilities, the role of the Informatician. IT end-user relationships; IT management.

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  • Module content:

    This module deals with the construction and management of digital repositories. It also addresses the characteristics of the digital repository in a rapidly changing technological world and a challenging information society. Core aspects include: system design, relationships to hybrid libraries, digital collections and rights management, standards, virtual referencing and the development and evaluation of digital repositories.

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  • Module content:

    This module examines aspects of the information and knowledge society within local, regional and international contexts. A special focus of the module is the interaction and exchange of data, information and knowledge from communities' local knowledge system with data, information and knowledge from the global knowledge system. The module discusses the growth and role of information and communication technologies (ICTs), and their implications for development.

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  • Module content:

    This module provides an overview of Competitive Intelligence (CI) and focuses on the needs for CI in organisations. The ways in which organisations compete and the benefits that CI can bring to these organisations will also be covered. The growing need for CI among South African organisations will also be examined. Practical examples and case studies will be used to highlight the value of CI in organisations.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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