Yearbooks

Programme: BChD Dentistry

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
11130001 Faculty of Health Sciences Duration of study: 5 years Total credits: 937
Contact:
Prof WD Snyman
[email protected]
+27 (0)123192552

Programme information

NB: Selection of candidates takes place prior to admission.

The General Regulations are applicable to bachelor’s degrees.

Each student in Dentistry must apply to the Registrar of the Health Professions Council of South Africa for registration as a student in Dentistry, within two months after the commencement of the first year of study. Students, who have been granted exemption from the first or second year of study, must also comply with the registration requirements.

NOTE: For students who registered for the BChD degree programme prior to 2014, the relevant regulations as they appear in the 2013 Yearbook will be applicable.

Admission requirements

  •  In order to register NSC/IEB/Cambridge candidates must comply with the minimum requirements for degree studies and with the minimum requirements for the relevant study programme.
  •  Life Orientation is excluded in the calculation of the APS.
  •  Grade 11 results will be used for the conditional admission of prospective students.
  •  Admission to Health Sciences study programmes is subject to a selection process.

 

 

Minimum requirements for 2016

Achievement Level

APS

English

Mathematics

Physical Science

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

5

3

C

C

5

3

C

C

5

3

C

C

35

 

 

 

 

Additional requirements

(a)   Candidates are not allowed to complete their first year of study at another university.

(b)   In terms of the selection procedure, candidates must pass English, Mathematics and Physical Science with at least a 5 rating code (60%- 69%), and achieve an APS of at least 35, in order to be considered for selection and/or admission.

(c)   At the conclusion of the selection process, candidates are informed in writing regarding the outcome.

(d)   Admission of foreign students to the BChD degree programme is limited to one annually. Only applications of candidates from SADC countries are accepted.

(e)   School-leaving candidates with no previous tertiary exposure, who have not been admitted to the first year of study for the BChD degree programme may register for the BSc degree programme in medical sciences or biological sciences at the University, provided that they comply with the admission requirements for the programme in question. A candidate who completes the first semester of such a degree programme successfully, may apply to be considered for admission to the second semester of BChD I on the grounds of this achievement. If successful, the student may be admitted to the second semester of BChD I.

Other programme-specific information

Note:

(i)      A new curriculum is being phased in for the programme. The first year of study will be followed for the first time in 2014, the second year in 2015, the third year in 2016, the fourth year in 2017 and the fifth year in 2018.

(ii)     The total credits and regulations for the degree programme in this publication are applicable to the new curriculum being phased in.

(iii)    In 2016 the fourth and fifth year of study will still be followed according to the old curriculum.

(iv)    Students who fail a year in the existing curriculum immediately prior to the year of the implementation of the revised curriculum will have to repeat all the modules for that particular year in the revised curriculum. 

(v)     The total credits and regulations for the old curriculum appear in the 2013 Yearbook and are applicable for students who registered for the BChD degree programme prior to 2014.                              

  • Apart from the examination modules mentioned above, the following compulsory academic information management module must also be passed during the first semester of the first year of study: AIM 101.
  • All new first-year students at the University must write an academic literacy test. On the grounds of the outcome of this test, students will either be exempted from the following academic literacy modules, or if they have failed the test mentioned above, will be required to pass in the relevant modules: ELH 111 and 112
  • The first semester of the year module PHY 181 is the same as PHY 131.
  • Students are exempted from the language module(s) on the basis of the successful completion of a language proficiency test at the beginning of the year.

Requirements for admission to specific modules
A student who has:

  1. obtained at least 50% in the final Grade 12 examination in Mathematics as well as in Physical Science, will be admitted to Molecular and cell biology (MLB 111), and a module in the subjects Chemistry, Physics, Zoology and Entomology, Genetics, Microbiology or Botany;
  2. obtained at least 50% in the final Grade 12 examination in Mathematics as well as in Physical Science, will be admitted to a module in Radiation Physics (RFI);
  3. obtained at least 50% in the final Grade 12 examination in either Physical Science or Life Sciences, will be admitted to modules in Occupational Therapy and Therapeutic Media;
  4. obtained at least 60% in the final Grade 12 examination in Mathematics, will be admitted to the module WTW 158 in Mathematics; and
  5. obtained at least 50% in the final Grade 12 examination in Mathematics, will be admitted to the module WTW 134 in Mathematics.

Examinations and pass requirements

Passing a module

A module mark is calculated from the continuous evaluation opportunities during the course of the presentation of the module in question. These evaluations shall include one or more of the following:

(i)      Evaluations regarding theoretical knowledge.

(ii)     Evaluations regarding clinical knowledge and skills.

(iii)    Compulsory attendance at and active participation in prescribed activities.

(iv)    A final comprehensive module examination moderated by external examiners.

Repeating modules (and thus the year of study)

(i)      Students must pass all the modules of a particular year of study in order to be admitted to the next year of study.

(ii)     Students who repeat the first or second year of study are exempted from the modules which have been passed in the unsuccessful year. The examination moderating meeting, in conjunction with the Dean/Chairperson of the School of Dentistry, retains the right to only award a pass mark in the said modules, if the student complies with the following requirements regarding those modules:

•     That the mark awarded to the relevant module was not awarded on the grounds of condonement;

•     That the student attended the relevant module regularly and furthermore complied with all other requirements.

•     That the contents of the module in the ensuing year correspond with the contents of the module concerned.

Examinations and pass requirements, subminima and continuous evaluation mark

(i)      In accordance with the stipulations of the General Regulations, no minimum year or semester mark is required for admission to the examination: Provided that the different year and semester modules in a School need not be handled in the same manner, although a great degree of uniformity is expedient. Any other requirements for admission to the examination are set out in the study manuals. A final mark of at least 50% is required to pass (see also Reg. D.1(b) (i)).

(ii)     Subminimum

A subminimum of 40% is required in the written section of an examination, with a subminimum of 50% in the clinical section of a module. At the beginning of the academic year, the head of department informs the students of the required subminimum in subsections of the modules offered by the department in question. This information is also published in the study manual.

(iii)    Continuous evaluation mark

A student obtains marks for practical and clinical work, for tests and also for assignments completed during the course of an academic year.

A student who repeats a year of study and who must acquire certificates of satisfactory preparation in failed modules, must comply with all the requirements set by the head of department.

 

(iii)   Supplementary examinations in the fourth year of study

A student who obtains between 40-49% in examination and promotion modules, is admitted to supplementary examinations. Should he or she fail this supplementary examination/promotion test, the fourth year has to be repeated. When a year of study has to be repeated, the student retains credit for the examination modules passed. Consult Reg. D.1 (e) regarding the certificate of satisfactory preparation and progress, which must be obtained in the year of repetition in all promotion modules already passed, as well as the extent of involvement of tudents regarding promotion modules already passed, in order to maintain a specific level of clinical skills.

(iv)  Examinations in the fifth year of study

A student who has failed the clinical part of any module in the final examination, will be required to repeat that module. The period which must elapse before the student may again sit an examination, is determined by the Dean, on the recommendation of the examination moderating committee. A student who repeats a module, must obtain certificates of satisfactory preparation in all the other modules that he/she has passed.

 

 

 

Promotion to next study year

Promotion to the next year of study

The stipulations of the General Regulations concerning satisfactory preparation and progress also apply to modules where a promotion test is required. Supplementary examination marks and pass marks in promotion modules are awarded according to the stipulations of the General Regulations: Provided that:

  1. Promotion is based on theoretical and/or practical and/or clinical evaluation throughout the year and a minimum of 50% is required to be promoted.
  2. A student, who has obtained a year mark of less than 50% can be admitted by the examination moderating meeting to a supplementary promotion test in the relevant promotion module.
  3. Students repeating a year of study retain credit for examination modules passed, unless determined otherwise, but a certificate of satisfactory preparation and progress must be obtained in all the promotion modules.
  4. In order to comply with the requirements for (iii) and to maintain a specified level of clinical skills, the extent of involvement of students in successfully completed promotion modules is determined by the relevant module chairperson, at the commencement of the year, and agreed with the student(s) concerned.

Failed candidates/Admission to the second semester of BChD I

  1. (aa)  Selected first-year students, who have passed a sufficient number of prescribed first-semester modules at 100 level will, in accordance with the stipulations of the omGeneral Regulations, autatically be admitted to the second semester of the first year of study. During the second semester, the students will be admitted to an examination on an anti-semester basis in the first-semester module(s) still outstanding, if this can be accommodated in the timetable.
  2. (bb) In the School of Dentistry, a student may not repeat more semester modules than the equivalent of eight lectures per week on an anti-semester basis in the second semester.
  3. Admission to the next year of study
  4. A student must pass all the modules of the relevant year of study for admission to the next year of study.

Admission to the second year of study

A student must pass all the modules of the first year of study for admission to the second year of study.

Failed candidates

A student, who has failed a year of study for the second time before completing BChD II, is excluded from the programme and will again be subjected to selection with a view to readmission to the second year of study. Also consult Reg. D.1 (c) concerning students who fail some modules of a year (and therefore the year of study).

Admission to the third year of study

A student must pass all the modules of the second year of study for admission to the third year of study.

Admission to the fourth year of study

A student must pass all the modules of the third year of study for admission to the fourth year of study.

Admission to fifth year of study

A student must pass all the modules of the fourth year of study for admission to the fifth year of study.

Academic exclusion from further study

  1. A student following a BChD degree will only be allowed two opportunities to repeat a year of study.
  2. A student who does not comply with the abovementioned requirement but nevertheless wishes to be admitted to the School, may request the Dean/Chairperson of the School in writing, to consider his or her application for readmission in accordance with the prescribed procedure.
  3. If a student fails one or more first-year modules (and therefore is not admitted to the second year of study), such a student forfeits his or her selection and must apply again for selection with a view to admission to the first year of study.
  4. A student, who has failed a year of study for the second time before completing BChD II is excluded from the programme and must apply again for selection with a view to readmission to the second year of study.

Pass with distinction

The degree is conferred with distinction on a student who has obtained at least 65% in all the examination modules of the final year of study, with an average of at least 75% for all the modules.

Minimum credits: 191

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    *For absolute beginners only.
    *Only students from the School of Healthcare Sciences may take this module during semester 2. All other students must  take this module during semester 1. Also note that students from the School of Healthcare Sciences, who already possess the language skills taught in this module, may write an exemption examination.
    The acquisition of basic Sepedi communicative skills with emphasis on everyday expressions and suitable high frequency vocabulary, within specific social situations.

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  • Module content:

    Find, evaluate, process, manage and present information resources for academic purposes using appropriate technology. Apply effective search strategies in different technological environments. Demonstrate the ethical and fair use of information resources. Integrate 21st-century communications into the management of academic information.

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  • Module content:

    Proficiency in academic English by interpreting and contextualising philosophical and sociological texts prescribed during the first semester; medical ethics; study skill improvement.                                                       *Presented to students in Health Sciences only.

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  • Module content:

    Proficiency in Academic English used in the basic medical sciences; analysis, synthesis and presentation of select texts prescribed in the second semester. *Presented to students in Health Sciences only.

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    Theory: Introduction to general chemistry: Measurement in chemistry, matter and energy, atomic theory and the periodic table, chemical compounds and chemical bonds; quantitative relationships in chemical reactions, states of matter and the kinetic theory; solutions and colloids, acids, bases and ionic compounds, chemical equilibria. Introduction to organic chemistry: Chemical bonding in organic compounds, nature, physical properties and nomenclature of simple organic molecules, isomerism, chemical properties of alkanes and cycloalkanes, alkenes, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and esters, amines and amides, carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids.
    Practicals.

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  • Module content:

    This is a broad introduction to the philosophy and history of science. Examples of themes and historical periods which are covered include: world views in ancient Greece; Socrates; Plato – the founder of Western thought; Aristotle – the foundation of a new tradition; Leonardo da Vinci; the foundation of modern science; the wonder years of the seventeenth century – the flourishing of the sciences and philosophy; the rising of mechanization; a drastic turn in man's vision – the rise of psychology; how the theory of relativity changed our view of the cosmos; quantum theory and its implications for the modern world view; the biological sciences and the secrets of life; the rise and role of psychology; the neuro-sciences; the place, role and benefit of philosophical thought in the sciences.

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  • Module content:

    This module comprises basic psychology and sociology concepts relevant to Medicine, and to Dentistry, in the case of BChD students. 
    Basic psychiatric concepts are also taught.

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  • Module content:

    Introductory study of the ultra structure, function and composition of representative cells and cell components. General principles of cell metabolism, molecular genetics, cell growth, cell division and differentiation.

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  • Module content:

    The acquisition of a basic medical orientated vocabulary compiled from Latin and Greek stem forms combined with prefixes and suffixes derived from those languages. The manner in which the meanings of medical terms can be determined by analysing the terms into their recognisable meaningful constituent parts, is taught and exercised. The functional use of medical terms in context as practical outcome of terminological application is continually attended to.

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  • Module content:

    Units, vectors, one dimensional kinematics, dynamics, work, equilibrium, sound, liquids, heat, thermodynamic processes, electric potential and capacitance, direct current and alternating current, optics, modern physics, radio activity.

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  • Module content:

    Systemic anatomy and embryology:
    An introduction to anatomical terminology, the musculosketetal system, nervous system, surface anatomy, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, urogenital system, gastro-intestinal system, the endocrine system and human embryology.
    Human osteology:
    Introduction to osteology, bone function and classification, humerus, radius, ulna, femur, tibia, fibula, clavicle, scapula, ribs, sternum, vertebrae, pelvis, hand and foot bones, sesamoid bones, skull, mandible, joints.
    Human histology:
    General introduction to cells and tissue, terminology, the cell and cytoplasm, organelles and inclusions, surface and glandular epithelium, general connective tissue, specialised connective tissue, namely cartilage, bone, blood and haemopoietic tissue, muscle and nervous tissue.

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  • Module content:

    • Principles of public oral health
    • Determinants of health
    • Definitions of health, disease and illness
    • Public health approaches to prevention

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to clinical dentistry:
    • Infection control training
    • Occupational health and safety training
    • Code of conduct, professionalism and ethical behaviour
    • Academic skills training (library, goal-orientation, time management, etc)
    • Basic dental assisting
    • Basic tooth anatomy and terminology
    • Dental terminology
    • Psychomotor skills training (model casting, carving of teeth out of plaster, wax
      work)
    • Introduction to the disciplines and specialities
    • Third language training
    • Clinic visits throughout the year
    • Visits to a dental practice

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Minimum credits: 184

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    Basic Afrikaans grammar and pronunciation and a specific technical (oral health) vocabulary is studied and practised to enable students to converse with patients in the professional environment. In this practical module, students are required to memorise phrases and to practise conversation skills under close observation.

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  • Module content:

    *For absolute beginners only
    *Only students from the School of Healthcare Sciences may take this module during semester 2. All other students must take this module during semester 1. Students from the School of Healthcare Sciences, who already possess the language skills taught in this module, may write an exemption examination.
    The acquisition of basic isiZulu communicative skills with emphasis on everyday expressions and suitable high frequency vocabulary, within specific situations.

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    • Metabolism
    • Neurophysiology
    • The somatic sensory system, pain and special senses
    • Muscle physiology
    • Haematology
    • Cardiovascular system
    • Respiratory system
    • The Urinary system
    • The Gastro intestinal system
    • The Endocrine system
    • The Reproductive system
    • Temperature homeostasis, sickness behaviour and skin
    • Immunology
    • Bone and cartilage metabolism and fracture healing
    • Pathophysiology

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  • Module content:

    Theory and practical training in basic emergency care.

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  • Module content:

    Clinically applied regional approach to human anatomy. Detailed cadaveric dissection of the head and neck, brain and spinal cord, axilla, upper limb, thorax, back and abdomen. Particular emphasis will be given to the head and neck region. The perineum, pelvis and lower limb will not be dissected, but taught with the aid of prosected specimens.

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  • Module content:

    This module is the study of the development, macroscopic and microscopic structure and function of tissue of the mouth and related structures with emphasis on the application in clinical dentistry. This module also includes the study of relevant molecular biology.

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  • Module content:

    • Clinic visits and visits to a dental practice
    • Patient administration training
    • Psychomotor skills training (model casting, carving of teeth out of plaster, wax
      work, wire bending)
    • Pre-clinical communication training – building up rapport with a patient and
       interviewing skills (commences in the second semester)
    • Examination skills training (commences in the second semester)

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  • Module content:

    • Orientation to health sciences research
    • Ethical consideration in the conduct of health sciences research
    • An overview of the research process
    • Selecting or identifying research problems
    • The literature review
    • Refining and defining the research question, formulating a hypothesis and
      preparing a research proposal
    • Quantitative research
    • Non-traditional and qualitative research designs
    • Sampling
    • Data collection and Data quality
    • Data analysis
    • Research reports and report evaluation

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  • Module content:

    Chair-side assisting:
    This clinical training entails the chair-side assisting of senior dental students during the treatment of patients.

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  • Module content:

    • Basic tooth morphology
    • Introduction to dental laboratory procedures in Removable Prosthodontics

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Basic Afrikaans grammar and pronunciation and a specific technical (oral health) vocabulary is studied and practised to enable students to converse with patients in the professional environment. In this practical module, students are required to memorise phrases and to practise conversation skills under close observation.

    View more

  • Module content:

    *For absolute beginners only
    *Only students from the School of Healthcare Sciences may take this module during semester 2. All other students must take this module during semester 1. Students from the School of Healthcare Sciences, who already possess the language skills taught in this module, may write an exemption examination.
    The acquisition of basic isiZulu communicative skills with emphasis on everyday expressions and suitable high frequency vocabulary, within specific situations.

    View more

Minimum credits: 186

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Introductory principles of clinical pharmacotherapy in view of applicable patient problems, receptors for medicines, principles of structure activity relationships, dynamic and kinetic principles to bring pharmacological principles and clinical therapy together in a problem-based curriculum.

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  • Module content:

    Procedures: skin, scrubbing and dressing for theatre. Physical examinations: cardiovascular examination, respiratory examination.

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  • Module content:

    The modules in the subject odontology form an integrated curriculum that is structured and presented by various lecturers from different departments of the school. The modules consist of theoretical, practical and clinical training.  The theoretical training includes anatomy, embryology, histology, microbiology and pathology of the teeth and teeth structure, while the clinical training is focused on the preventive, curative, and minor rehabilitative treatment of teeth development and eruption malformations, dental caries, pulpal and peri-radicular pathology, unerupted and impacted teeth, and tooth wear as part of the ageing process.

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  • Module content:

    (a) Surgical anatomy: Applied surgical anatomy. (b) Examination, anaesthesia, distress: Examination of a surgical patient, stress control and sedation, local anaesthetics, local anaesthetic techniques, applied pharmacology and prescription (synoptic), emergency procedures. (c) Basic oral surgery: Sterilisation and disinfection, oral surgical armamentarium, exodontia and related complications, bleeding problems, antrum. (d) Advanced oral surgery: Apaicectomy, impactions, electro and cryosurgery, soft tissue infections and osteomyelitis, pre-prosthodontic surgery (review). (e) Basic maxillo-facial surgery: Traumatology, surgical pathology, neuralgias, temporo-mandibular joint derangements. (f) Advanced maxillo-facial surgery: Micro surgery (review), orthognathic surgery, facial cleft deformities, cranio-facial surgery (review).

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  • Module content:

    The modules in this subject extend over the third, fourth and fifth years of study. Lectures, practical and clinical work, seminars and discussions on the following: (a)   Basic principles and therapeutic measures.
    (b)   Occlusion: development and morphology.
    (c)   Development and growth: cranium.
    (d)  Stainless steel: properties and uses.
    (e)  Orthodontic devices: requirements and types.
    (f)   Changes in tissue.
    (g)  Malocclusion: classification and aetiology.
    (h)  Examination, aids, diagnosis and planning.
    (i)   Bad habits.
    (j)   Preventive and interceptive orthodontics.
    (k)  Treatment: principles, problems with space, methods.
    (l)   The role of extraction.
    (m) Retention.

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  • Module content:

    (i)    The modules in the subject are offered in the third, fourth and fifth years of
            study.
    ii)     The depth and weighting of the knowledge base and the clinical application
             and interpretation of the modules will be dependent on the year of study.
    (iii)   The goal is to educate and train general dental practitioners who will be able
             to apply their expertise and knowledge in the prevention and treatment of
             periodontal diseases in both the public and private sectors within the scope
             of the dental practitioner. In order to achieve this, the student must know the
             embryology, normal anatomy, histology and functions of the periodontium.
             The student must understand the aetiology, pathogenesis, the risk and other
             factors associated with the various forms of periodontal diseases, and their
             classification. The student must be able to perform a comprehensive clinical
             examination and use the information so gained to arrive at a diagnosis and
             treatment plan. The student must become proficient in applying preventive
             control methods, to supply oral hygiene methods and applicable instructions
             to the patient; motivating the patient; scaling and root planning; be able to
             correctly evaluate the tissue response to these procedures; be able to
             differentiate clinically between the various forms of periodontal disease and
             be able to perform clinical procedures associated with the treatment of early
             and moderate stages of periodontal diseases. The student must understand
             the treatment possibilities associated with established and advanced
             periodontal diseases, including regenerative procedures and implant
             treatment, and when and to whom, such patients should be referred for
             specialist diagnosis and treatment, should this be necessary.

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  • Module content:

    Holistic evaluation of a patient, the clinical hypothetic-deductive reasoning processes, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment planning. Under the guidance of a tutor, and by utilising a special “practice patient” file, the students start treating a “practice patient” comprehensively. The student compiles a portfolio, on a continuous basis, on the clinical and administrative procedures concerning the "practice patient". The portfolio contains the student’s year mark, which is determined on a 50:50 basis, with the examination mark as the final pass mark. The examination mark is determined when the student presents the practice patient case to an audience and a panel of adjudicators.
    Application of business management principles during patient management. Preparing the student for a meaningful and successful career in an increasingly complex business and health care environment. Application of certain principles and skills in terms of: 
    •   Psychology in the dentistry practice.
    •   Political parameters in dentistry.
    •   Sociology and dentistry.
    •   Ethics for the dentist.
    •   Career possibilities.
    •   Management of a practice.
    Additional to this, students should understand the economic, cultural, legal and regulatory environment to establish and optimise patient management.

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  • Module content:

    The purpose of this module is to enable the dentist to identify medical problems, which may have an effect on the dental treatment or may affect the patient’s general health. The dentist must be able to interpret the patient’s medical history, in order to modify the treatment plan accordingly to ensure a safe dental treatment and/or to refer the patient for medical or specialist care.

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  • Module content:

    Examination and evaluation of the denture patient, principles and taking of impressions, determination of vertical and horizontal jaw relations and facial bow recording. Aesthetics. Fitting and placing of the finished denture. Post treatment. Clinical aspects of manufacturing of complete and partial dentures, obturators and special apparatus.

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  • Module content:

    • Oral epidemiology
    • Prevention and oral health promotion
    • Health services (systems)

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  • Module content:

    General pathology
    • Cell injury, death and adaptation
    • Acute and chronic inflammation
    • Repair: Cell regeneration, fibrosis and wound healing
    • Hemodynamic disorders, thrombosis and shock
    • Disorders of the immune system
    • Neoplasia
    • Environmental diseases
    • General pathology of infectious diseases
    Diseases of the following organ systems
    • Blood vessels
    • Heart
    • Haemopoietic and lymphoid systems
    • Respiratory tract
    • Urinary tract
    • Gastrointestinal tract
    • Liver and biliary tract
    • Pancreas
    • Male genital system
    • Female genital system and breast
    • Endocrine system
    • Musculoskeletal system
    • Skin
    • Nervous system

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  • Module content:

    Infectious diseases in the various body systems:
    This module is an introduction to infectious diseases occurring in the various body systems. The block will cover the diseases caused by the organisms, pathogenesis, specimen collection, laboratory diagnosis as well as management (treatment, prevention and control) of these infections.
    Oral microbiology:
    This module will provide knowledge to dental students about clinical microbiology and infectious diseases as well as basic principles for the recognition and identification of infectious agents relevant to the discipline of dentistry. Furthermore, the role of relevant organisms that are associated with the oral cavity in health and disease and understand diagnosis and be able to recognise patients with infections related to dentistry.

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Minimum credits: 210

Core modules

  • Module content:

    The modules in this subject consist of theoretical and practical training in oral epidemiology, community based primary and secondary prevention and the application of the principles of public oral health in his/her working environment.

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  • Module content:

    The modules in this subject will empower the student with knowledge of the embryology, anatomy, physiology and pathology of the oral mucosa, the salivary glands, intra- and extraoral soft tissue and bone in order to diagnose and manage lesions, diseases and conditions of the oral mucosa, salivary glands, intra and extraoral soft tissue and bone.

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  • Module content:

    The modules in the subject odontology form an integrated curriculum that is structured and presented by various lecturers from different departments of the school. The modules consist of theoretical, practical and clinical training . The theoretical training includes anatomy, embryology, histology, microbiology and pathology of the teeth and teeth structure, while the clinical training is focused on the preventive, curative, and minor rehabilitative treatment of teeth development and eruption malformations, dental caries, pulpal and peri-radicular pathology, unerupted and impacted teeth, and tooth wear as part of the ageing process.

    View more

  • Module content:

    (a)   Surgical anatomy: Applied surgical anatomy.
    (b)   Examination, anaesthesia, distress: Examination of a surgical patient, stress control and sedation, local anaesthetics, local anaesthetic techniques, applied pharmacology and prescription (synoptic), emergency procedures.
    (c)   Basic oral surgery: Sterilisation and disinfection, oral surgical armamentarium, exodontia and related complications, bleeding problems, antrum.
    (d)   Advanced oral surgery: Apaicectomy, impactions, electro and cryosurgery, soft tissue infections and osteomyelitis, pre-prosthodontic surgery (review).
    (e)   Basic maxillo-facial surgery: Traumatology, surgical pathology, neuralgias, temporo-mandibular joint derangements.
    (f)    Advanced maxillo-facial surgery: Micro surgery (review), orthognathic surgery, facial cleft deformities, cranio-facial surgery (review).

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  • Module content:

    (i) The modules in the subject are offered in the third, fourth and fifth years of study.
    (ii) The depth and weighting of the knowledge base and the clinical application and interpretation of the modules will be dependent on the year of study.
    (iii) The goal is to educate and train general dental practitioners who will be able to apply their expertise and knowledge in the prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases in both the public and private sectors within the scope of the dental practitioner. In order to achieve this, the student must know the embryology, normal anatomy, histology and functions of the periodontium. The student must understand the aetiology, pathogenesis, the risk and other factors associated with the various forms of periodontal diseases, and their classification. The student must be able to perform a comprehensive clinical examination and use the information so gained to arrive at a diagnosis and treatment plan. The student must become proficient in applying preventive control methods, to supply oral hygiene methods and applicable instructions to the patient; motivating the patient; scaling and root planning; be able to correctly evaluate the tissue response to these procedures; be able to differentiate clinically between the various forms of periodontal disease and be able to perform clinical procedures associated with the treatment of early and moderate stages of periodontal diseases. The student must understand the treatment possibilities associated with established and advanced periodontal diseases, including regenerative procedures and implant treatment, and when and to whom, such patients should be referred for specialist diagnosis and treatment, should this be necessary.

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  • Module content:

    Holistic evaluation of a patient, the clinical hypothetic-deductive reasoning processes, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment planning. Under the guidance of a tutor, and by utilising a special “practice patient” file, the students start treating a “practice patient” comprehensively. The student compiles a portfolio, on a continuous basis, on the clinical and administrative procedures concerning the "practice patient". The portfolio contains the student’s year mark, which is determined on a 50:50 basis with the examination mark as the final pass mark. The examination mark is determined when the student presents the practice patient case to an audience and a panel of adjudicators.
    Application of business management principles during patient management. Preparing the student for a meaningful and successful career in an increasingly complex business and health care environment. Application of certain principles and skills in terms of: 
    •   Psychology in the dentistry practice.
    •   Political parameters in dentistry.
    •   Sociology and dentistry.
    •   Ethics for the dentist.
    •   Career possibilities.
    •   Management of a practice.
    Additional to this, students should understand the economic, cultural, legal and regulatory environment to establish and optimise patient management.

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  • Module content:

    The modules in this subject extend over the third, fourth and fifth years of study. Lectures, practical and clinical work, seminars and discussions on the following: (a) Basic principles and therapeutic measures. (b) Occlusion: development and morphology. (c) Development and growth: cranium. (d) Stainless steel: properties and uses. (e) Orthodontic devices: requirements and types. (f) Changes in tissue. (g) Malocclusion: classification and aetiology. (h) Examination, aids, diagnosis and planning. (i) Bad habits. (j) Preventive and interceptive orthodontics. (k) Treatment: principles, problems with space, methods. (l) The role of extraction. (m) Retention.

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  • Module content:

    Diagnostic imaging 370/470 is a two year course delivered during the 3rd and 4th years of the BChD programme. It deals with all aspects of radiographic imaging of the maxillofacial region appropriate to the Dentist. Diagnostic imaging 370 is delivered during BChD III as a promotion course. Diagnostic imaging 470 is an examination course delivered during BChD IV. The purpose of Diagnostic imaging 470 is: - To formalise teaching and examination of Diagnostic Imaging 370/470. - To certify students’ ability to apply knowledge obtained in Diagnostic Imaging 370 to clinical and practical situations of Diagnostic Imaging. - To certify that students act professionally during clinical situations of Diagnostic Imaging.

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  • Module content:

    Examination and evaluation of the denture patient, principles and taking of impressions, determination of vertical and horizontal jaw relations and facial bow recording. Aesthetics. Fitting and placing of the finished denture. Post treatment. Clinical aspects of manufacturing of complete and partial dentures, obturators and special apparatus.

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Minimum credits: 193

Core modules

  • Module content:

    The modules in this subject consist of theoretical and practical training in oral epidemiology, community based primary and secondary prevention and the application of the principles of public oral health in his/her working environment.

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  • Module content:

    The modules in this subject will empower the student with knowledge of the embryology, anatomy, physiology and pathology of the oral mucosa, the salivary glands, intra- and extraoral soft tissue and bone in order to diagnose and manage lesions, diseases and conditions of the oral mucosa, salivary glands, intra and extraoral soft tissue and bone.

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  • Module content:

    The modules in the subject odontology form an integrated curriculum that is structured and presented by various lecturers from different departments of the school. The modules consist of theoretical, practical and clinical training. The theoretical training includes anatomy, embryology, histology, microbiology and pathology of the teeth and teeth structure, while the clinical training is focused on the preventive, curative, and minor rehabilitative treatment of teeth development and eruption malformations, dental caries, pulpal and peri-radicular pathology, unerupted and impacted teeth, and tooth wear as part of the ageing process.

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  • Module content:

    (a)   Surgical anatomy: Applied surgical anatomy.
    (b)   Examination, anaesthesia, distress: Examination of a surgical patient, stress
            control and sedation, local anaesthetics, local anaesthetic techniques,
            applied pharmacology and prescription (synoptic), emergency procedures.
    (c)   Basic oral surgery: Sterilisation and disinfection, oral surgical
            armamentarium, exodontia and related complications, bleeding problems,
            antrum.
    (d)   Advanced oral surgery: Apaicectomy, impactions, electro and cryosurgery, soft
            tissue infections and osteomyelitis, pre-prosthodontic surgery (review).
    (e)   Basic maxillo-facial surgery: Traumatology, surgical pathology, neuralgias,
            temporo-mandibular joint derangements.
    (f)    Advanced maxillo-facial surgery: Micro surgery (review), orthognathic surgery,
            facial cleft deformities, cranio-facial surgery (review).

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  • Module content:

    (i)   The modules in the subject are offered in the third, fourth and fifth years of study.
    (ii)  The depth and weighting of the knowledge base and the clinical application and interpretation of the modules will be dependent on the year of study.
    (iii) The goal is to educate and train general dental practitioners who will be able to apply their expertise and knowledge in the prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases in both the public and private sectors within the scope of the dental practitioner. In order to achieve this, the student must know the embryology, normal anatomy, histology and functions of the periodontium. The student must understand the aetiology, pathogenesis, the risk and other factors associated with the various forms of periodontal diseases, and their classification. The student must be able to perform a comprehensive clinical examination and use the information so gained to arrive at a diagnosis and treatment plan. The student must become proficient in applying preventive control methods, to supply oral hygiene methods and applicable instructions to the patient; motivating the patient; scaling and root planning; be able to correctly evaluate the tissue response to these procedures; be able to differentiate clinically between the various forms of periodontal disease and be able to perform clinical procedures associated with the treatment of early and moderate stages of periodontal diseases. The student must understand the treatment possibilities associated with established and advanced periodontal diseases, including regenerative procedures and implant treatment, and when and to whom, such patients should be referred for specialist diagnosis and treatment, should this be necessary.

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  • Module content:

    Holistic evaluation of a patient, the clinical hypothetic-deductive reasoning processes, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment planning. Under the guidance of a tutor, and by utilising a special “practice patient” file, the students start treating a “practice patient” comprehensively. The student compiles a portfolio, on a continuous basis, on the clinical and administrative procedures concerning the "practice patient". The portfolio contains the student’s year mark, which is determined on a 50:50 basis with the examination mark as the final pass mark. The examination mark is determined when the student presents the practice patient case to an audience and a panel of adjudicators.
    Application of business management principles during patient management. Preparing the student for a meaningful and successful career in an increasingly complex business and health care environment. Application of certain principles and skills in terms of: 
    •   Psychology in the dentistry practice.
    •   Political parameters in dentistry.
    •   Sociology and dentistry.
    •   Ethics for the dentist.
    •   Career possibilities.
    •   Managing a practice.
    Additional to this, students should understand the economic, cultural, legal and regulatory environment to establish and optimise patient management.

    View more

  • Module content:

    The modules in this subject extend over the third, fourth and fifth years of study. Lectures, practical and clinical work, seminars and discussions on the following: (a) Basic principles and therapeutic measures. (b) Occlusion: development and morphology. (c) Development and growth: cranium. (d) Stainless steel: properties and uses. (e) Orthodontic devices: requirements and types. (f) Changes in tissue. (g) Malocclusion: classification and aetiology. (h) Examination, aids, diagnosis and planning. (i) Bad habits. (j) Preventive and interceptive orthodontics. (k) Treatment: principles, problems with space, methods. (l) The role of extraction. (m) Retention.

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  • Module content:

    Diagnostic imaging 570 is an attendance course presented during the first semester of BChD V. The purpose of the course is: - To formalise teaching and formative assessment of final year students’ clinical and diagnostic skills in Diagnostic imaging. - To develop students’ confidence in clinical aspects of Diagnostic imaging. - To ensure radiographic service rendering in Diagnostic imaging by senior (5th year) students while 4th year students are in training.

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  • Module content:

    Examination and evaluation of the denture patient, principles and taking of impressions, determination of vertical and horizontal jaw relations and facial bow recording. Aesthetics. Fitting and placing of the finished denture. Post treatment. Clinical aspects of manufacturing of complete and partial dentures, obturators and special apparatus. Pre-clinical crown and bridge techniques course. Examination and evaluation of patient's requiring crown and bridge treatment. Principles of tooth preparation and impression-making. Shade selection. Finishing and cementation of fixed restorations. Clinical aspects of manufacturing of single crowns and fixed prostheses. An introduction to lasers and implants.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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