Yearbooks

Programme: MBChB Medicine

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
10130001 Faculty of Health Sciences Duration of study: 6 years Total credits: 1216
Contact:
Prof BG Lindeque
[email protected]
+27 (0)123541201

Programme information

Each student in Medicine must apply to the Registrar of the Health Professions Council of South Africa for registration as a student in Medicine, immediately after admission to the first year of study.

After obtaining the degree, a student must register with the Health Professions Council of South Africa as an intern, and complete at least one year of training at an institution approved by the abovementioned Council for this purpose. (Students who qualify after July 2006, will have a compulsory two-year internship.) After this, he or she must register with the Council as a physician and complete one year of community service before he or she may work in private practice.

The integrated outcomes-based problem-oriented programme consists of theoretical blocks, special activities (SAs) and clinical rotations. During the final 18 months, referred to as the Student Intern Complex (SIC), all the programme activities take place in the clinical settings.

Admission requirements

The applications of international candidates who come from countries that have medical schools will not be considered for placement in the MBChB study programme.
  •  In order to register NSC/IEB/Cambridge candidates must comply with the minimum requirements for degree studies and with the minimum requirements for the relevant study programme.
  •  Life Orientation is excluded in the calculation of the APS.
  •  Grade 11 results will be used for the conditional admission of prospective students.
  •  Admission to Health Sciences study programmes is subject to a selection process.
  •  For selection purposes the sum of the results in six subjects including English Mathematics and Physical Science is calculated. 
 

Minimum requirements for 2016

Achievement Level

APS

English

Mathematics

Physical Science

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

5

3

C

C

5

3

C

C

5

3

C

C

35

 

 

Additional requirements

The Faculty can accommodate 300 first-year MBChB students. Applicants for MBChB I are evaluated according to different categories, with the minimum admission requirements set according to the categories in question.

  1. In terms of the selection procedure, candidates must pass English, Mathematics and Physical Science with at least a 5 rating code (60%-69%), and achieve an APS of at least 35, in order to be considered for selection and/or admission.
  2. It is not possible for candidates to complete the first year of study for this study programme at another South African university.
  3. A candidate who has passed a full academic year at another university, with at least four first-year subjects, will be considered for selection, but only for admission to MBChB I.
  4. Admission of foreign candidates is limited. Preference will be given to students from SADC countries.
  5. Candidates will be notified per SMS and in writing of the outcome of the selection.
  6. School leaving candidates with no previous tertiary exposure who have not been admitted to MBChB I, may register for a first year of study in the BSc degree programme in Biological or Medical Sciences at the University of Pretoria, provided that they qualify for admission. If they pass the prescribed first-semester modules, they may apply before 31 May of their first year of study, to be considered for admission to MBChB I as from the second semester
  7. Candidates who have not been admitted to the first year of study for the MBChB degree programme, may apply for admission to any other degree programme at this University, provided that they comply with the entrance requirements for the degree programme in question; and may, on the grounds of that achievement, reapply for selection (changing to MBChB I).

Other programme-specific information

Important:
Students have three assessment opportunities, namely a block test, first examination and second examination in order to pass GPS Generic procedural skills 280. Although a student will not be held back if GPS 280 is failed, the module in question must be passed by the end of the first semester of the third year of study, failing which the student will be held back in the third year of study.

Fourth year of study:

  • SA 11 (GNK 487) Skin 487 is preceded by one study week named SA 11a in the 4th year, 2nd semester.
  • Students who offer BOK 284 (25 credits) from 2015 will be required to offer and pass module GNK 482.
  • SA 16 (GNK 482) Forensic medicine 482 will be offered for the first time in 2017. Students who passed BOK 284 prior to 2015 will not be required to offer this module as the contents were included in BOK 284 (31 credits).

Fifth year of study:
Block 18 (GNK 585) Pharmacotherapy 585 is preceded by two study weeks, namely Block 18a in the 2nd year, 2nd semester and Block 18b in the 4th year, 2nd semester.
Note: Marks obtained in the morning rotations are taken into account with the relevant block marks.

Second half of the fifth year of study, and the sixth year of study:

Admission to the Student Intern Complex (SIC):

  1. For admission to the SIC, a student is required to pass in all the examination modules and morning rotations of the first semester of the fifth year of study.
  2. Rotations and end-of-rotations evaluations (first examinations) and end-of-semester examinations (second examinations)
  1. Training in the SIC extends over 18 months. Rotations take place over a period of 63 weeks in three semesters.
  2. All students who are involved, will enjoy the same rank of seniority and will be known as student interns; i.e. no differentiation will in this case be made between the status of the fifth-year and sixth-year student concerned.
  3. A rotation extends over seven weeks, and every three rotations are grouped together in a logical manner in the three semester divisions of the SIC.
  4. The semester rotations are divided as follows:

Student Intern Complex (SIC) (18 months)
SIC Semester (a): Surgery and related disciplines and Family Medicine

  1. Surgery (7 weeks) GNK 680 – 52 credits
  • General surgery
  • Vascular surgery
  • Plastic surgery
  • Paediatric surgery
  • Cardiothoracic surgery
  • Neurosurgery (1 week)
  1. Surgery-related subdisciplines (3 weeks)
  • Urology (2 weeks) GNK 690 – 11 credits
  • Orthopaedics (3 weeks) GNK 681 – 17 credits
  • 1 week of exams
  1. Anaesthesiology and Family medicine (7 weeks)
  • Anaesthesiology (3½ weeks) GNK 682 – 20 credits
  • Family medicine (3½ weeks) GNK 691 – 20 credits

Total credits per semester: 120

SIC Semester (b): Internal medicine and related sub-disciplines and psychiatry

  1. Internal medicine (7 weeks) GNK 683 – 45 credits
  2. Internal medicine-related subdisciplines (3½ weeks) GNK 684 – 20 credits
  • Dermatology
  • Haematology
  • Cardiology
  • Neurology (3½ weeks) GNK 693 – 15 credits
  1. Psychiatry (7 weeks) GNK 685 – 40 credits

Total credits per semester: 120

SIC Semester (c): Women’s and children’s health and community-based education

  1. Obstetrics and gynaecology (7 weeks) GNK 686 – 40 credits
  2. Paediatrics (7 weeks) GNK 687 – 40 credits
  3. Community obstetrics (3½ weeks) GNK 692 – 20 credits
  4. Community-based education (3½ weeks) GNK 688 – 20 credits

Total credits per semester: 120

SA13 Special activity: Diagnostic laboratory medicine

  1. Diagnostic laboratory medicine (2 weeks) GNK 689 – 11 credits 
  • Image-forming medicine
  • Evidence-based medicine
  • Bioethics (2 days)*

Total credits: 11
Total credits Student Intern Complex: 371

*SA13 Diagnostic laboratory medicine is followed by two study days, namely SA13a in the 6th year, 2nd semester.

  1. End-of-rotation evaluations are held at the end of every seven-week rotation. Students who obtain a final mark of at least 60%, are promoted in the rotation and need not sit the end-of-semester examination in that rotation.
  • In the first semester, this examination will be held three times (for students in the first semester of their sixth year of study).
  • In the second semester, this examination will also be held three times for students in the second semester of both the fifth and the sixth year of study.
  1. End-of-semester examinations are held in the relevant rotations of the semester of a SIC in which students have performed unsatisfactorily (i.e. less than 60%). Students who fail these examinations, will not be admitted to the rotations of the subsequent semester and will be required to repeat and pass the unsuccessful rotation(s). (Further details in this regard appear in Rotation(s) failed or not promoted in below.
  2. During the first semester of the sixth year of study, two lecturing periods of two weeks each will be devoted to the following: GNK 689: Diagnostic laboratory medicine; Image-forming medicine; Evidence-based medicine; Bioethics.

Rotation(s) failed or not promoted in

  1. A student intern who fails a seven-week rotation or rotations for the first time (i.e. the end-of-rotation evaluation) or is not promoted in the rotation(s) in question, sits the end-of-semester examination in the rotation(s) in question. If successful in the second examination, he or she continues with the rotations of the following semester. If unsuccessful, the relevant rotation(s) must be repeated at the first opportunity in the next semester. The nature of such repetition must be regarded as remedial and it ends with the next end-of-rotation examination.
  2. The end-of-rotation examination for such student interns serves as the next official evaluation and must, as such, be monitored by external examiners. A pass mark of at least 50% is required.
  3. Student interns who pass the end-of-rotation evaluation, continue with the next “semester rotations” and may re-join their original group for the duration of the rest of the SIC. The third rotation of the semester will then again be out of phase.
  4. Student interns who fail the end-of-rotation evaluation again (i.e. first examination), routinely continue with the next rotations or semester activity as applicable according to the number of rotations failed. Such student interns will complete the unsuccessful rotations at the end of the training period, after all other rotations have been passed.
  5. The sixth year of study may be failed twice, provided that no previous year has been failed. This means that there is a total of seven semesters available for the sixth year of study to a student intern who has not failed any previous year of study.

Examinations and pass requirements

Passing a block/special activity in the MBChB degree programme

  1. A block mark is calculated from the end of the block assessment and the continuous evaluation opportunities during the course of the presentation of the block or special activity in question. These evaluations shall include one or more of the following:
  1. Evaluations regarding theoretical knowledge.
  2. Evaluations regarding clinical knowledge and skills.
  3. Compulsory attendance of, and active participation in prescribed activities.
  4. A final comprehensive block test moderated by external examiners.
  1. Students may exercise the option to have the block mark at the end of the year validated as the final block mark for the block in question (i.e. they are exempted from the block examination for this block), provided that they comply with the following requirements:
  1. The abovementioned block mark is more than 60%.
  2. Proven attendance of all applicable block-specific activities, namely:
  • All tests/continuous evaluations.
  • All practicals and morning ward-round activities.
  • All relevant skills laboratory activities.
  • All relevant community-based education activities.
  • All clinical rotations.
  1. A pass mark in the clinical rotation test.
  2. Attendance of the block in question from day 1.
  3. No conviction by the Faculty Preliminary Disciplinary Committee (Student offences), of any form of dishonesty or fraud.
  1. A block examination is granted to all registered students regardless of the block mark.
  2. The final block mark is calculated from the block examination mark and the block mark (continuous evaluation) in a 50:50 or 60:40 ratio, depending on the year of study and/or block-specific regulations. The formula according to which the final block mark is calculated will be set out in the block book (study guide) and communicated to students at the commencement of the programme.
  3. In order to pass in a block/special activity in which a clinical component is included, a subminimum of 50% is required for the block examination mark, implying that a student who obtains a block mark of more than 50% and a block examination mark of less than 50%, with a final block mark of more than 50%, fails the block and will thus be admitted to a second examination.
  4. Regarding the Longitudinal Clinic Attachment Programme (L-CAS activities) of an academic year (module code LCP 180, 280, 380, 480 and 580), students must hand in a portfolio at the end of the academic year which will be assessed. Satisfactory attendance will furthermore be required regarding this module to pass the year. Note: Students are not allowed into patients’ homes or any other unauthorised facility.
  5. A second examination in a block will be granted to all students who fail the block.
  6. As a rule, the second examination in question will take place in November/ December of the same year, or in January of the following year. However, this regulation is not applicable to the end of the first semester of MBChB V. (A minimum of 50% is required in order to pass in the second examination.
  7. An aegrotat or extraordinary examination granted to a student who could not participate in the block examination due to illness or other acceptable reasons, will take place during the second examination period. Students must apply formally for such an examination, and admission to the examination is approved by the Chairperson of the School or his/her authorised person. Where applicable, the Chairperson of the School may first require a recommendation from the Faculty Health Committee before approving an application for admission to an aegrotat. All modalities of a final examination must be completed jointly as an aegrotat or an extraordinary examination, even if part of it has already been completed as part of the examination sat in the previous examination period. The final block mark is calculated from the marks of all the divisions/modalities of the aegrotat or extraordinary examination and the block mark in question (continuous evaluation mark). The same criteria set for a final mark in a block, are applicable in this case. Note: No special dates will be arranged for an aegrotat/extraordinary examination. These examinations will only take place on the scheduled dates for regular first/second examinations.
  8.  Aegrotat/extraordinary tests are not allowed for the MBChB degree programme. Students who have acceptable reasons for being absent from tests, will of course have no block mark, and a pass in the block(s) will depend totally upon the block examination mark.

Repeating blocks and/or special activities (and thus the year of study) in the MBChB degree programme
A student who has failed one or more blocks and/or special activities in a year of study, must repeat the year of study. However, such a student will be exempted from the blocks and/or special activities passed in the previous (failed) year.
The Examination Moderating Meeting and/or the Chairperson of the School of Medicine, reserves the right to only award a pass mark to the said blocks and/or special activities should the student comply with the following requirements in respect of the blocks and/or special activities in question:

  • That the mark awarded to the said block or special activity was not awarded on the grounds of condonement.
  • That the student’s attendance of the said block and/or special activity was satisfactory, that he or she participated in all other activities and complied with all other requirements.

Examinations and pass requirements
In accordance with the stipulations of the General Regulations, a minimum year or semester mark of 40% is required for admission to the examination: Provided that the different year and semester modules in a School need not be handled in the same manner, although a considerable degree of uniformity is advisable.
The stipulation that students be admitted to the examination without reservation, is supported. A final block mark in the relevant module is, however, calculated from the block examination mark as well as the block mark compiled from continuous evaluation during the presentation of the module (i.e. the semester, year, module or block mark). The latter is calculated from the marks obtained in one or more of the undermentioned:

  1. Evaluations of theoretical knowledge.
  2. Evaluations of clinical knowledge and skills.
  3. Compulsory attendance of and participation in prescribed activities.

The contribution of each modality in the calculation of the abovementioned mark is set out in the regulations and published in the study guides. The details are explained in detail to the students concerned before commencement of the modules. Likewise, also the weight allocated to the abovementioned marks and the various examination marks when calculating the final block mark awarded to the student, which varies between 50:50 and 40:60 according to the field of study, year of study and programme-specific compilation.
The importance of continuous evaluation in the assessment of students is non-negotiable, and therefore the marks awarded in these type of evaluations will form part of the final pass mark of all modules/subjects.
The pass mark for essays is at least 50%. The stipulations of the General Regulations regarding requirements for dissertations apply mutatis mutandis to essays.
For requirements regarding the abovementioned, also consult the study manual of a given block.

Academic exclusion from further study

  1. In accordance with the stipulations of the General Regulations, re-registration of a student is permitted only if the student completes the degree programme for which he or she is registered within the prescribed minimum period of study plus two years.
  2. In the case of the MBChB degree offerred by the School of Medicine, a student who fails a year of study for a second time, must apply, in writing, to the Readmission Committee of the School chaired by the Chairperson of the School, for readmission to the programme.
  3. The Committee in question will take all relevant factors into consideration.

Promotion to next study year

Failed candidates/Admission to the second semester of MBChB I

  1. Selected first-year students, who have passed in all prescribed first-semester modules at 100 level will, in accordance with the stipulations of the General Regulations, automatically be admitted to the second semester of the first year of study.
  2. During the second semester, the students who have failed modules may be admitted to an examination on an anti-semester basis, if this can be accommodated in the timetables.
  3. In the School of Medicine, a student may not repeat first-semester modules comprising more than 8 lectures per week on an anti-semester basis in the second semester.

Failed candidates/Admission to MBChB II

  1. A student must pass all the modules prescribed for MBChB I, for admission to MBChB II.
  2. Students who take the maximum allowable number of first-semester modules on an anti-semester basis in the second semester, must pass a second examination in the modules in question prior to commencement of the second year of study. Should a student pass in these modules, the fact that the modules were failed in the first semester, will not affect his or her admission to MBChB II.
  3. None of the second-semester blocks and special activities of MBChB I are presented on an anti-semester basis.
  4. ALL students who fail the first year of study for the MBChB degree, forfeit their selection and must apply, in writing, for readmission to the MBChB degree programme. Also consult Reg.M.1(c) regarding students who fail certain blocks in a year and therefore the year of study.

Admission to the second year of study
A student must pass all the modules prescribed for the first year of study before admission to the second year of study.

Failed candidates/Admission to MBChB III

  1. Students must pass in all the prescribed modules for MBChB II for admission to MBChB III.
  2. Students who fail one block, may repeat the MBChB II year* without forfeiting his/her selection.
  3. Students who fail two blocks, but who have not failed a block before, may repeat the MBChB II year*, without forfeiting his/her selection.
  4. Students who fail three or more blocks, are automatically excluded from the programme.
  5. Students who have failed MBChB I and subsequently also MBChB II (notwithstanding the number of blocks involved), are automatically excluded from the programme.
  6. Students who are excluded from the programme, will again be subjected to selection with a view to readmission to MBChB II.

See also Examinations and pass requirements regarding students who fail certain blocks and therefore have to repeat the year of study.

Admission to the third year of study
A student must pass all the modules prescribed for the second year of study with exception of SA9 for admission to the third year of study.

Failed candidate (third year of study)
A student who fails any given block (i.e. examination modules), fails and will be required to repeat the third year of study. Consult also faculty regulations regarding students who fail some blocks, and thus the year of study.

Admission to the fourth year of study:
A student must pass all the modules prescribed for the third year of study for admission to the fourth year of study. Consult also faculty regulations regarding students who fail certain blocks in a year, and therefore the year of study.

Failed candidates (fourth year of study)
A student who fails any given block (i.e. examination modules), fails and will be required to repeat the fourth year of study. Consult also the paragraph regarding students who fail some blocks, and thus the year of study.

Admission to the fifth year of study:
A student must pass all the modules prescribed for the fourth year of study for admission to the fifth year of study.

Fifth year of study:
Second semester
The Student Intern Complex (SIC) commences at the beginning of the second semester of the fifth year of study.

Failed candidates

  1. At the end of the first semester of the fifth year of study, students will sit examinations in each block in which they have not been promoted. A second examination will take place immediately after commence-ment of the SIC. Successful students obtain SIC status and may continue with the SIC.
  2. Students who fail the examination as well as the second examination in one block or more (and therefore fail the semester) may not continue with the SIC but participate in a remedial programme, which will take place during the first seven weeks of the second semester.
  3. A second examination will be granted in the outstanding blocks at the end of the seven-week period.
  4. Unsuccessful completion of the morning rotations during the first semester of the fifth year of study prevents a student from promoting the relevant block(s) and examination will become compulsory.
  5. If the students pass in the second examination, they may join the SIC as from the second seven-week rotation period.
  6. If a student again fails the second examination, the rest of the year of study will be used as remediation. In January of the subsequent year, students may commence provisionally with the SIC, but will have to interrupt the SIC for the duration of the unsuccessful block when it is presented in the first semester. Students will then have to repeat the block. Successful students then continue with the SIC.

Pass with distinction

The degree is conferred with distinction on a student who has obtained an average of at least 75% in the Student Intern Complex rotations.

General information

Students who will comply with all the requirements for the MBChB degree by 28 February, will receive the degree in question officially during the Autumn graduation ceremonies in April of the particular year. Students who will only comply with all the requirements for the MBChB degree during or after March, will receive the degree in question officially during the Spring graduation ceremonies in September of the particular year.

Student interns: MBChB

All students

  1. At the conclusion of each seven-week rotation, an end-of-rotation evaluation (EORE) takes place in the different departments. The aim with the EORE is the identification of those students who obtain examination exemption (semester examination) and those who are not exempted and will have to sit the examination at the end of the semester. All EOREs are supported by external examiners.
  2. The same process takes place in rotations with a duration of 3,5 weeks.
  3. No marks are disclosed to students, only the names and/or registration numbers of the students who must sit the semester examination.
  4. After conclusion of the semester examination (which extends over three days on dates determined beforehand), an EMM is held, with the following objectives:
  • Validation of the rotation marks as the semester examination mark, of the students who have obtained examination exemption. The rotation mark and the EORE mark contribute to the final mark.
  • Identification of the students who have passed the semester examination. The rotation mark and the semester examination mark contribute to the final mark;
  • Identification of the students who have failed the semester examination. These students are referred to Student Administration, as a new rotation division must now be followed; and
  • Identification of the students who need study assistance.

Students who repeat rotations: MBChB

  1. Students who repeat rotations, do the end-of-rotation evaluation (EORE) at the conclusion of the rotation that has been repeated. The objective is to obtain a pass mark. The continuous evaluation marks and the EORE mark contribute to the final mark.
  2. On the first Wednesday after the conclusion of the rotation, an EMM takes place at 13:00 (or a different timeslot as arranged), to evaluate the achievement of the students, who have repeated the rotation. The objectives of this EMM are:
  • Identification of the students who pass the rotation that has been repeated (final mark of 50% or more) (maximum indicated on the form is "50H");
  • Identification of the students who fail the rotation that has been repeated. These students are referred to Student Administration, as a new rotation division must now be followed; and
  • Identification of the students who need study assistance.
  1. The achievement of the students who have repeated a 3,5 week rotation, is discussed at the same EMM.

Students who are "finalists" at another time than the end of the sixth year of study: MBChB

  1. Students who repeated previous rotations successfully, and who are now “finalists”, but will be doing the current rotation for the first time:
  1. These students do the EORE just like all other students do, the objective being, as in the case with other students, to identify those who do or do not obtain, exemption from the semester examination.
  2. Students who obtain examination exemption after the conclusion of the EORE, thus pass the rotation automatically.
  3. Students who do not obtain exemption from the semester examination after the conclusion of the EORE, must therefore sit the examination at the end of the relevant semester.
  4. In keeping with UP regulations, these students, who are completing their studies (“finalists”), who have only one course (rotation) to complete in order to comply with all the requirements for the MBChB degree, and who have not obtained examination exemption, may apply to sit a "special examination" the following week (at a time earlier than the semester examination where applicable). This examination (which will take place at an earlier time), must preferably be scheduled for the Monday or Tuesday of the following week. The department determines the format and due to the fact that the student has already been through the external evaluation process, the presence of an external examiner at the special examination is optional, although recommended. The final mark comprises the examination mark and must be 50% or more to pass. The marks must be available by the Wednesday in order that these students' marks can be submitted to the EMM, which will be held on that day.
  5. The objectives of the EMM for this category of students are:
  • Identification of the students who have passed the special examination. These students complete the programme, and a special mini oath-taking ceremony is arranged for them; and
  • Identification of the students who have failed the special examination. These students fail the course, must repeat the relevant rotation and must therefore be referred to Student Administration.
  1. Students who are "finalists", but who are repeating the current rotation (all circumstances – previously, or at a recent EMM, identified as having failed): MBChB
  1. These students do the EORE as all other students. The objective is to obtain a pass mark. The continuous evaluation marks and the EORE mark contribute to the rotation mark, which, in this case, is also the final mark. The mark must be 50% or more, but the maximum that will be indicated on the form, is “50H”.
  2. On the first Wednesday after the conclusion of the rotation, an EMM will be held at 13:00 (or another time slot as arranged), to evaluate the achievement of these students who are repeating the current rotation. The objectives of this EMM are:
  • Identification of the students who have passed the EORE/examination. These students thus complete the MBChB degree programme and a mini oath-taking ceremony will be arranged for them; and
  • Identification of the students who have failed the EORE/examination. These students thus fail the rotation, must repeat the relevant rotation and must therefore be referred to Student Administration.
  1. Students in this category, who are only repeating a 3,5 week rotation, will follow the exact same route, but a unique EMM will be arranged shortly after completion of the EORE/examination. The same objectives will apply.

Minimum credits: 142

Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    (a)  Molecule to cell (2 weeks)
    The principles of physiology, chemistry and genetics applicable to man. Macro molecules, lipids, carbohydrates and protein. Introductory genetics: molecular evolution, gene structure and transmission, genetic control of the cell cycle and genetic defects. Impulse conduction and muscle contraction. Nerve potentials.
    (b)  Cell to tissue (4 weeks)
    Gamatogenesis, embryogenesis, embryopathy, histology and incidence of  tissue types. The immune system and its components. Tissue specificity, genetic control of expression and factors influencing gene expressions.
    (c) Tissue to organism (2 weeks)
    Anatomical terminology and introduction to the systemic and functional organisation of the human body. Arrangement of tissues in organs. Life stages of man.

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  • Module content:

    Theory: Introduction to general chemistry: Measurement in chemistry, matter and energy, atomic theory and the periodic table, chemical compounds and chemical bonds; quantitative relationships in chemical reactions, states of matter and the kinetic theory; solutions and colloids, acids, bases and ionic compounds, chemical equilibria. Introduction to organic chemistry: Chemical bonding in organic compounds, nature, physical properties and nomenclature of simple organic molecules, isomerism, chemical properties of alkanes and cycloalkanes, alkenes, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and esters, amines and amides, carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids.
    Practicals.

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  • Module content:

    This is a broad introduction to the philosophy and history of science. Examples of themes and historical periods which are covered include: world views in ancient Greece; Socrates; Plato – the founder of Western thought; Aristotle – the foundation of a new tradition; Leonardo da Vinci; the foundation of modern science; the wonder years of the seventeenth century – the flourishing of the sciences and philosophy; the rising of mechanization; a drastic turn in man's vision – the rise of psychology; how the theory of relativity changed our view of the cosmos; quantum theory and its implications for the modern world view; the biological sciences and the secrets of life; the rise and role of psychology; the neuro-sciences; the place, role and benefit of philosophical thought in the sciences.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to the Study of Medicine/Dentistry. Introduction to the Faculty of Health Sciences and students’ interaction with the faculty description of the curriculum and the demands made on students at different stages. Introduction to the principles contained within the “golden threads”. Introduction to the cultural differences and taboos important to the health care worker. First stages of learning a new language – Setswana and Afrikaans.

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  • Module content:

    The bio-psychosocial approach to health care; patients in their family and community environment; the role of psychology in the work of a generalist; how patients adapt to sickness and cope with stress; the health care system in rural South Africa; health promotion and health education; the use of electronic databases.

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  • Module content:

    Introductory principles to clinical pharmacotherapy on the grounds of applicable patient problems/disease processes; receptors for medicines; principles of structure activity relationships; dynamic and kinetic principles to bring pharmacological principles and clinical therapy together in a problem-based curriculum.

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  • Module content:

    This module comprises basic psychology and sociology concepts relevant to Medicine, and to Dentistry, in the case of BChD students. 
    Basic psychiatric concepts are also taught.

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  • Module content:

    Introductory study of the ultra structure, function and composition of representative cells and cell components. General principles of cell metabolism, molecular genetics, cell growth, cell division and differentiation.

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  • Module content:

    The acquisition of a basic medical orientated vocabulary compiled from Latin and Greek stem forms combined with prefixes and suffixes derived from those languages. The manner in which the meanings of medical terms can be determined by analysing the terms into their recognisable meaningful constituent parts, is taught and exercised. The functional use of medical terms in context as practical outcome of terminological application is continually attended to.

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  • Module content:

    Units, vectors, one dimensional kinematics, dynamics, work, equilibrium, sound, liquids, heat, thermodynamic processes, electric potential and capacitance, direct current and alternating current, optics, modern physics, radio activity.

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  • Module content:

    The longitudinal clinic attachment programme will link students to one of about 40 clinics in Pretoria and its surrounds.  Each student is allocated to a specific clinic in Tshwane, Hammanskraal or Metsweding for a four-year period - medical students from the middle of the first year to the middle of the fifth year, and dentistry students from the middle of the first year to the end of the second year.  Students will visit these clinics during the course of each block and special activity as negotiated with each block and rotation chair.  The activities they do at the clinic will be the practical application of the theory they acquired in class with the added benefit of the experience of the context of the patient and the healthcare system.

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Elective modules

Minimum credits: 185

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    The longitudinal clinic attachment programme will link students to one of about 40 clinics in Pretoria and its surrounds.  Each student is allocated to a specific clinic in Tshwane, Hammanskraal or Metsweding for a four-year period - medical students from the middle of the first year to the middle of the fifth year, and dentistry students from the middle of the first year to the end of the second year.  Students will visit these clinics during the course of each block and special activity as negotiated with each block and rotation chair.  The activities they do at the clinic will be the practical application of the theory they acquired in class with the added benefit of the experience of the context of the patient and the healthcare system.

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Core modules

Elective modules

Minimum credits: 203

Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    (a)     Abdomen and abdominal problems
    (b)     Mamma
    A study of the anatomy and functions, as well as the diseases of the different organs in the abdominal cavity including conditions of the abdominal wall. Furthermore, lectures on the clinical conditions of the mamma will be presented.

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  • Module content:

    (a) Pregnancy (b) Neonatology The study of the natural physiological complexes and pathological conditions concerning pregnancy and birth. Different learning opportunities and situations are used, including prenatal clinics, labour wards and neonatal units. Emphasis is placed on acquiring scientifically-based information, as well as important practical and clinical skills. The behavioural sciences are also included in the block, as well as the social, family and community-related aspects. (c) Growth and development (2 weeks) A study of the unique aspects of the physical growth and neuro-development of a normal child. Learning opportunities are presented to the student to identify problems concerning growth and development, as well evaluating and handling children with abnormal growth and development. Emphasis is placed on the prevention, evaluation and handling, as well as the effective treatment with a decided result. This block integrates with the previous block in order to enable the student to understand the continuum of growth and neuro-development from the prenatal to the post-natal milieu.

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  • Module content:

    Discussion of the important diseases in order to obtain a complete overview of the disease, which will include anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology and clinical medicine.

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  • Module content:

    Lungs and chest. Discussion of the significant diseases in order to obtain a complete overview of the disease, which will include anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology and clinical medicine.

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  • Module content:

    Haematological malignant neoplasia: Basic and clinical information with regard to this group of diseases, including healing ability with regard to lymphoma, leukaemia, myeloproliferative diseases; and immunoproliferative diseases.

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  • Module content:

    An opportunity for the undergraduate student to acquire knowledge, skills and experience in the medical practice environment.

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Minimum credits: 212

Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Module 1: Genital conditions Module 2: Urinary tract disease A study of the disorders of the urinary tract and genital systems in males and in females. Theoretical and practical instruction is used to integrate basic science and clinical medicine. Important clinical skills must be mastered.

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  • Module content:

    Discussion of the important diseases of the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous system with a view to obtaining a total overview of the specific diseases, which will include anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology, clinical neurology, clinical neurosurgery and neuropaediatrics.

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  • Module content:

    A learning opportunity for the undergraduate student to:
    (i)    experience in practice, the general practitioner or family physician,
    (ii)   meet the unselected patient and
    (iii)  observe first-hand, the problems which have to be contended within
            primary care. The problems comprise biomedical, psycho-social and
            managerial challenges.

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  • Module content:

    The module is designed to help students gain knowledge, skills and attitudes in order to understand and respond to the special needs and vulnerability of children in relation to development, nutrition, environment and adaptation; recognise by means of history and examination, common and important abnormalities of development, nutrition, environment and adaptation and be able to deal with them effectively; recognise by means of history and examination, common and important health problems of infancy and childhood and be able to deal with them effectively.
    The mornings are devoted to direct contact with paediatric patients and their problems by means of small-group activities at a variety of experimental learning sites.
    The afternoon periods are used for representative case studies with regard to a series of general or important themes, illustrated by multidisciplinary symposia, lectures, problem-solving exercises and self-tuition.

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  • Module content:

    A study of the build and functions as well as the diseases of the musculo-skeletal movement apparatus in adults and children. Emphasis is placed on the diagnosis and treatment of the most prominent conditions as well as the acquiring of practical and clinical skills.

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  • Module content:

    An opportunity for the student to become familiarised with the most common endocrinology problems in practice, including diabetes and obesity. The focus is on the recognition of these conditions and their practical handling.

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  • Module content:

    An opportunity for the undergraduate student to acquire knowledge and skills in respect of the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the head and neck region by means of lectures, seminars, self-tuition and practical sessions in the clinic, ward, theatre as well as the skills laboratory. A problem-based and inter-disciplinary approach is emphasised.

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  • Module content:

    Discussion of the physiology and psychology of ageing and an overview of diseases commonly found in the elderly, with a biomedical psycho-social approach.

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  • Module content:

    Clinical manifestations and management.

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  • Module content:

    The longitudinal clinic attachment programme will link students to one of about 40 clinics in Pretoria and its surrounds.  Each student is allocated to a specific clinic in Tshwane, Hammanskraal or Metsweding for a four-year period - medical students from the middle of the first year to the middle of the fifth year, and dentistry students from the middle of the first year to the end of the second year.  Students will visit these clinics during the course of each block and special activity as negotiated with each block and rotation chair.  The activities they do at the clinic will be the practical application of the theory they acquired in class with the added benefit of the experience of the context of the patient and the healthcare system.

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  • Module content:

    1. Forensic pathology, thanatology taumatology
    2. Medicine and law, medical law

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Minimum credits: 239

Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    The module will help students to acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes that will enable them to diagnose and manage certain psychiatric conditions. Preventive and promotive aspects of management are also emphasised. These psychiatric conditions include the following: mood disorders, anxiety disorders, alcohol and substance-related disorders, sexual disorders, schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, mental disorders due to general medical conditions, personality disorders, eating disorders and sleep disorders. These topics will be handled as applicable to children, adolescents and adults. Additional topics include: legal aspects, aggression, child abuse, child development, mental retardation and interpersonal skills. During morning lectures, students are directly exposed to psychiatric patients and their problems by means of small-group activities. The afternoon lectures are used for the solution of problem-orientated case studies and accompanied exploration of the themes mentioned above. The module is student-oriented, with the emphasis on self-tuition.

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  • Module content:

    This module aims to integrate the concepts of Family Medicine and Community Medicine for the delivery of health care in South Africa. The module content covers medico-legal aspects of practice, ethical issues, as well as approaches to common problems in practice, with emphasis on the application of the bio-psychosocial model of care in the South African district health system.

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  • Module content:

    The block consists of two modules, one practical and the other theoretical. The objective of the trauma practicals is to introduce students to clinical recognition of trauma emergencies, institution of emergency resuscitation, application of life saving and life support manoeuvres and emergency treatment of the trauma victim. Using actors/models, students are taught the application of the Advanced trauma life support (ATLS) (ABCDE) type approach to trauma. The trauma theory comprises the introduction to the full spectrum of trauma as a disease. Epidemiology of trauma, mechanisms of wounding, including ballistics, the biological response to trauma, wound healing and complications of trauma will be taught. Emergency treatment, resuscitation and intensive care treatment of the trauma victim will be covered. A systematic course on a thematic basis will be given to cover the major organ systems prioritised according to the ATLS type approach of life threatening, limb threatening or disfiguring injuries. Thus, thoracic, cardiovascular, abdominal, head and neck trauma will be dealt with as potential life threatening injuries, orthopaedic as limb threatening trauma and skin injuries are mainly disfiguring. Thermal, electrical and chemical burns and hypothermia will be covered. Introduction to physical and psychological rehabilitation and nutrition of the trauma victim will be taught.

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  • Module content:

    Core pharmacotherapy and applicable clinical aspects of the most general and prominent diseases and conditions, principles of toxicology and medical-forensic aspects of substance abuse, court proceedings and iatrogenic deaths.

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  • Module content:

    A basic introduction to the underlying principles of the theory and practice of anaesthesiology applicable to the generalist.  Learning experiences comprise practical residency (prior to Block 18), formal interactive lectures, workshops and case studies (during Block 18).

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  • Module content:

    Internal medicine (7 weeks) in the Student Intern Complex.

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  • Module content:

    Psychiatry (7 weeks) in the Student Intern Complex.

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  • Module content:

    Forensic medicine morning rotation.

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  • Module content:

    Neurology in the Student Intern Complex.

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Minimum credits: 288

Core modules


The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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