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Programme: BAdmin International Relations

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
07131151 Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences Duration of study: 3 years Total credits: 393
Contact:
Prof LP Malan
[email protected]
+27 (0)124202063

Programme information

The purpose of this package is to provide qualifiers with an in-depth knowledge and understanding of contemporary world politics and related changes in the international system. This will enable learners, once they are employed in the public or private sector, to respond in an innovative and proactive manner to the problems and challenges of globalisation.

Admission requirements

  • To be able to register NSC candidates must comply with the minimum requirements for degree studies as well as with the minimum requirements for the relevant study programme.
  • Life Orientation is excluded when calculating the APS.

Minimum requirements for 2016

Achievement Level

APS

Afrikaans or English

Mathematics

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

5

3

C

C

Mathematics

4

or

Mathematical

Literacy

4

3

D

D

28

 

This programme is only offered in English. Students cannot be admitted to a BCom degree via a BAdmin if they do not comply with the admission requirements for a BCom degree.

 

Other programme-specific information

Only two 14-week modules, or the equivalent thereof, that are not preceded by the 100- and 200-level modules, may be taken for degree purposes. In other words, at least four 14-week modules must be taken at 300-level that are preceded by the 100- and 200-level except for the modules offered at 200- and 300-level only.

At each year level a minimum of four quarter or two semester modules of the electives should be from the same subject. As the credits per module may differ from faculty to faculty, the total credits for the required number of elective modules could exceed the indicated values.

Note: See the alphabetical list of modules for prerequisites of all modules.

(1)     STL and IPL have no modules at year-level 1, but follow on PTO 111 and PTO 120.

(2)     A maximum of 24 credits may be taken.

(3)     Language modules with a maximum value of 64 credits may be taken up to year-level 2 from the following:

- A European language (from English, German, French, Spanish) at UP or

- An international language from Arabic, Mandarin or Russian at Unisa.

See the Faculty of Humanities for credits, prerequisites and presentation of these modules.

Specialisation modules: IPL 310, 320

"Major subject"
To be considered a "major subject" the equivalent of four 14-week modules, including two at 300-level, must be passed provided that:

  • the following modules which are offered at 300-level only, are also considered "major subjects": Labour law 311 (ABR 311), Labour relations 320 (ABV 320), and International business management 359 and 369 (OBS 359 and 369);
  • only two 14-week modules, or the equivalent thereof, that are not preceded by the 100- and  200-level modules, may be taken for degree purposes. In other words, at least four 14-week modules must be taken at 300-level that are preceded by the 100- and 200-level, except for modules offered on 200- and 300-level only.

Promotion to next study year

According to General Regulation G.3 students have to comply with certain requirements as set by the Faculty Board.

  1. A student must pass at least 4 core semester or 2 core year modules to be admitted to the subsequent year of study.
  2. If a student has passed less than the required minimum of 4 core semester or 2 core year modules, he/she will not be readmitted to the Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences. Such a student may apply in writing to the Faculty's Admissions Committee to be readmitted conditionally – with the proviso that the Admissions Committee may set further conditions with regards to the student's academic progress. The Faculty's Admissions Committee may deny a student's application for readmission.
  3. If a student has been readmitted conditionally, his/her academic progress will be monitored after the first semester examinations to determine whether he/she has complied with the requirements set by the Admissions Committee. If not, his/her studies will be suspended.
  4. A student whose studies have been suspended because of his/her poor academic performance has the right to appeal against the decision of the Faculty's Admissions Committee.
  5. A student may be refused promotion to a subsequent year of study if the prescribed tuition fees are not paid.
  6. A student may be refused admission to the examination, or promotion to a subsequent year of study or promotion in a module (if applicable) if he/ she fails to fulfil the attendance requirements. Class attendance in all modules and for the full duration of all programmes is compulsory for all students.

Pass with distinction

  1. A degree may be awarded with distinction provided the candidate meets the following criteria:
  1. Completes the degree within three years;
  2. Obtains a Cumulative Grade Point Average CGPA) of 75%;
  3. Repeated passed modules will not be considered. The initial pass mark of module will be used when calculating the GPA.
  1. Transferees from other faculties and from other universities  who still complete their bachelor degrees (including credits transferred and recognised from the degrees they registered for originally) within three years will be considered as exceptional cases by the Dean.
  2. The GPA will be not be rounded up to a whole number.
  3. Exceptional cases will be considered by the Dean.

General information

Minimum requirements for bachelor's degrees; semester and year modules; new regulations

  1. Students who commenced their studies before 2015 must complete the programme in terms of the curriculum of the year in which they commenced their studies, or in terms of the curriculum of the year in which they switched to their current field of specialisation. Students who prefer to do so may, however, apply to change over to the latest curriculum, but then they should comply with all the requirements thereof and they may not revert to the regulations of an earlier year.
  2. Students who are registering for a degree programme for the first time in 2015 must take the modules indicated under the particular field of specialisation.

Please note: Only two 14-week modules, or the equivalent thereof, that are not preceded by the 100- and 200-level modules, may be taken for degree purposes. In other words, at least four 14-week modules must be taken at 300-level that are preceded by the 100- and 200-level, except for modules offered on 200- and 300-level only.
It is thus the responsibility of students to ensure before registration, that their curricula comply with all the requirements of the applicable regulations.

Minimum credits: 112

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    Find, evaluate, process, manage and present information resources for academic purposes using appropriate technology. Apply effective search strategies in different technological environments. Demonstrate the ethical and fair use of information resources. Integrate 21st-century communications into the management of academic information.

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  • Module content:

    This module intends to equip students with the competence in reading and writing required in the four high impact modules: Business Management, Financial Accounting, Statistics and Economics. Students will also be equipped to interpret and draw figures and graphs and to do computations and manage relevant formulas. During Semester 1 students engage with the online computer program MyFoundationsLab individually in a flexible learning environment, and during Semester 2 they attend the scheduled contact sessions and do the coursework.                                                                              This module is offered by the Faculty of Humanities.

     

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    This module deals with the core principles of economics. A distinction between macroeconomics and microeconomics is made. A discussion of the market system and circular flow of goods, services and money is followed by a section dealing with microeconomic principles, including demand and supply analysis, consumer behaviour and utility maximisation, production and the costs thereof, and the different market models and firm behaviour. Labour market institutions and issues, wage determination, as well as income inequality and poverty are also addressed. A section of money, banking, interest rates and monetary policy concludes the course.

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  • Module content:

    *Module content will be adapted in accordance with the appropriate degree programme. Only one of KOB 181 - 184 may be taken as a module where necessary for a programme.
    Applied business communication skills.
    Acquiring basic business communication skills will enhance the capabilities of employees, managers and leaders in the business environment. An overview of applied skills on the intrapersonal, dyadic, interpersonal, group (team), organisational, public and mass communication contexts is provided. The practical part of the module (for example, the writing of business reports and presentation skills) concentrates on the performance dimensions of these skills as applied to particular professions.

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  • Module content:

    Basics of politics
    An introduction to the study of organised political society at national and international levels with specific reference to political concepts, approaches and methods. The emphasis is on state and governance as frameworks for analysis. This includes the development and comparison of related political entities, processes and regime types of a democratic and non-democratic nature, also considering the salient changes brought about by globalisation.

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  • Module content:

    Cooperation in the political world
    An introduction to cooperation at national and international levels with specific reference to the nature, foundations and politics of cooperation. This includes an analysis and comparison of the politicisation, localisation and internationalisation of issues and of the problems at national, regional and international levels related to cooperation in an increasingly interdependent world characterised by the absence of supranational institutions. Attention is also paid to the corresponding dynamics of regime development, performance and change.

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  • Module content:

    This module in public administration is designed specifically to assist students in understanding the role of public administration in a modern state, the unique characteristics of public administration, the schools and approaches in public administration and introducing the various generic administrative functions. The discipline of public administration has developed rapidly and by implication, has changed and shifted its paradigm over the years. The purpose of this module is to introduce public administration to the student as a field of study that makes a significant contribution to the effective administration and management of government institutions.

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  • Module content:

    This module in public administration will introduce the constitutional framework pertaining to public administration. The South African system of government, the functions, role and powers of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of government as well as the functioning of the three spheres of government will be discussed. The module will enable the student to understand how and where public administration is practiced.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Introduction to industrial and organisational psychology
    This section is an introduction to the various schools of thought in psychology with particular emphasis on industrial and organisational psychology and its fields of application. The basic principles of scientifically systematising industrial psychological knowledge will be discussed. The biological basis of behaviour will be addressed in order to lay the foundation for the application of ergonomical principles.
    Individual processes
    This section consists of the principles of learning as found in the work context. The role of perception in the work environment will be discussed by considering aspects such as shape, depth, distance and colour perceptions. Cognition, thought, reasoning, memory, creativity and decision-making will be included. Intelligence will be addressed and placed in an Industrial and organisational psychology perspective.

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  • Module content:

    Development and personality
    This module consists of a discussion of the life span and important periods in human development with emphasis on their meaning in the work context. With regard to personality, the following themes will be addressed: the cultural context of personality, its formation and determinants of personality; personality as determinant of behaviour as well as the development and maintenance of self-image. Attention will be given to the basic methods of personality measuring and personality assessment.
    Man in interaction
    This theme deals with some central aspects in human interaction.  These aspects should be known and understood by prospective human resource management practitioners and Industrial Psychologists, as they are acknowledged as human behaviour specialists in the work context who can assist employers/organisations to enhance the performance, productivity and wellness of human resources in the workplace.  Effective human interaction plays a pivotal role in this environment.  Thus this module covers aspects like the self-concept, social roles, social perception, time structuring and management, motivation and frustration and psychological adaptation processes and how it relates to human interaction in general and with reference to the workplace.  Both theory and practical implications are covered.

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  • Module content:

    Principles of marketing management and marketing instruments, customer centricity,  the process of marketing management, market segmentation, positioning and marketing information systems, environmental analysis, identification of target markets, value creation, positioning strategies, consumer behaviour, relationship marketing, relationship intention, application of product, price, marketing communication and distribution strategies.

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  • Module content:

    The making of the Modern World: a survey
    A selection of themes on Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe and their contribution to the making of the Modern World.

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  • Module content:

    Africa and South Africa: a survey
    An overview focusing on the making of African and South African societies from the earliest times to the present with emphasis on the most significant historical forces, factors and events.

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  • Module content:

    E-marketing, services marketing, not-for-profit marketing, business-to-business marketing, retailing, global marketing.

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Minimum credits: 136

Core modules

  • Module content:

    International theory and organisation
    What cause war and peace? Can international order and justice be reconciled? Does the international structure matter? The answers depend on the theoretical lenses through which world politics are viewed. An overview is provided of competing theoretical perspectives of international relations. It includes mainstream and alternative perspectives, as well as the underlying ideas, theories and variants of each. These theories also propose different approaches to global peace, amongst others peace through international organisation. A comprehensive analysis is made of selected international organisations with a universal or regional scope, such as the United Nations, the African Union and the Southern African Development Community, and of international law that underpins these organisations and their activities.

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  • Module content:

    Foreign policy and diplomacy
    A short introduction to the study of foreign policy is followed by an explanation of the use of the comparative method and a framework for foreign policy analysis and evaluation. This allows for a comparative study of the foreign policies of selected states from the major regions of the world, amongst others of South African foreign policy. In each case study the policy environment, the formulation and implementation processes, as well as the substance of the particular state’s foreign policy are covered. Thereafter the focus narrows to diplomacy: the oldest, most versatile and universally used instrument of foreign policy. The nature, history, modes of diplomacy and legal framework of the institution are explored. Examples are drawn from global practice, with specific consideration of the evolution of diplomatic practice within the African and South African context.

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  • Module content:

    This module in public administration constitutes an in-depth analysis of the generic administrative functions, including, policy making, organising, financing, staffing and control. Students will thus be equipped with knowledge and skills related to government strategic planning, policy-making and decision-making, budgeting, public procurement, human resource management functions and employment legislation impacting on human resources within public organisations.

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  • Module content:

    This module in public administration introduces the student to the process of planning, executing and evaluating research in the public sector. Students will be enabled to identify, plan, execute and present a research project. This is a service learning module and as such students will be expected to complete approximately 15 hours service learning and submit a portfolio as part of their formal assessment.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Political dynamics (Micro)
    The study of the theory and practice of behavioural phenomena in politics. With reference to appropriate examples, the emphasis is on the study of political culture, leadership, communication, interests groups, parties and party systems; on elections, electoral systems, voting behaviour; and on public opinion and direct popular control techniques.

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  • Module content:

    Political dynamics (Macro)
    A theoretical basis and framework is provided for the description, analysis and classification of political and policy problems. The emphasis is on the nature of the state, governance and conflict in Africa. Amongst others a study is made of the issues of colonialism and post-colonialism, democratisation, authoritarianism and the development of the state in Africa, in the context of a globalising world.

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  • Module content:

    Internal and external influencing factors of consumer behaviour, the consumer's decision process and application fields of consumer behaviour, consumerisms and social responsibility, buying behaviour of consumers in both product and service related industries, consumer psychology and the influence thereof on buying behaviour, psychology of pricing, influencing factors in consumer buying behaviour, the impact of various forms of marketing communication on buying behaviour.

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  • Module content:

    Integrated brand communications approach, marketing communication planning, objectives and budgets for integrated marketing communications, principles and strategising of marketing communication elements, new media, the brand name communication process, marketing metrics and evaluation for marketing communication effectiveness.

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Minimum credits: 140

Core modules

  • Module content:

    International political economy
    The nature and functioning of the international contemporary political-economic order are analysed against the background of the process of globalisation. The focus is on the interaction of political and economic trends and issues such as the economic importance and political impact of regional trade blocs; the debt burden of states; international aid; the role and influence of multinational corporations; and the transfer of technology to less-developed countries; the rise of new economic powers in the Global South; and global economic governance.

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  • Module content:

    Security and strategic studies
    A study of traditional and contemporary approaches to security and strategy. Attention is paid to new theories on war, security and strategy; military and non-military security issues and threats; the national security of developing states; as well as the relationship between policy, strategy and tactics. The latter includes an introductory overview of the nature, levels, patterns, forms and instruments of strategy, and the laws of war. The national, regional and continental security situation in Africa and modes of multilateral security cooperation in particular are analysed, also in relation to extra-continental trends. Regarding the aforesaid, emphasis is placed on the legal and institutional framework, national security policy and strategic posture of South Africa.

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  • Module content:

    This module in public administration is designed specifically to assist students to have a better understanding regarding the depth, origin and development of ethics in public service and administration. The emphasis here is on building responsive public servants whose duties and responsibilities do not only encourage the effective and efficient functioning of public organisations in an aim to facilitate better service delivery to all, but also apply ethical personal and organisational codes and standards in their daily operational activities. The purpose of this module is to enable the student to apply, synthesise and abstract theory into practice for a better public service of the future.

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  • Module content:

    This module on public administration is designed to broaden the view of students on the understanding of the origin and development of administrative systems. The emphasis is on the practical application of knowledge to problems of developing societies. Increasing global interdependence require scholarly interest in comparative public administration. A motivating force for comparative Public administration is the search for discovering regularities in administrative processes and behaviours throughout the human experience, irrespective of place and time.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Human resource management systems
    This section provides an introduction to human resource management systems and addresses current developments and problems in the field, which will be comprehensively addressed and include the following:
    job analysis, description, specification, and design, remuneration theory and systems, job evaluation and grading as well as benefit and fringe-benefit systems. Remuneration systems as motivation for employees will also be included.
    Human resources provision
    Human resources provision will be presented from an industrial psychological perspective and will include the following themes: human resources planning;
    macro and micro variables which could affect personnel forecasting and provision; human resource information systems; the auditing of skills as well as techniques such as recruitment, selection, placement and induction.

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  • Module content:

    Motivation and performance management
    This section will address the main characteristics of a performance management system and will focus on the strategic and motivational value of the process. Performance management will be addressed under the following headings: criteria development; performance planning; data gathering; observation and documenting; performance appraisal; appraisal instruments; performance feedback to promote motivation.
    People and career development
    This section will address current methods that can be used to develop human resources and to present career development programmes in order to promote performance at both an individual and organisational level. Emphasis will be on needs analysis, curriculum design, goal setting for learning, programme development, preparation of materials, training interventions, presentation and facilitation skills as well as course evaluation. The integration of individual career expectations with the organisation's requirements and strategies will be illustrated based on career development.

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  • Module content:

    Political theory
    A theoretical and normative study of political ideas. This includes the study of key political thinkers such as Plato, Thomas Hobbes and John Rawls as well as the contemporary manifestations of ideologies such as liberalism, socialism, conservatism and nationalism. This normative assessment of politics concludes with a critical evaluation of the development, nature and practical value of prominent democratic theories including participatory, legal, and deliberative democracy.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Democratic studies
    A high level critical analysis of democratic theory and practice. The analysis of democratic theory will include themes such as classical, radical, deliberative and feminist perspectives. The analysis of democratic practice will include aspects such as democratisation, democratic consolidation, democratic citizenship and society, the role and importance of civil society, the institutions and procedures for democracy and “good governance”.
    Part 2: Political analysis
    The methods and practice of political analysis is the focus of study. The principles and problems underpinning different approaches and methods of political analysis are described and explained. This includes the nature, methods and use of comparative analysis, forecasting, risk analysis, performance evaluation and the political audit. These analytical methods are positioned in a political and policy context, with emphasis on practical application. Applicable examples and case studies are used throughout.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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