Yearbooks

Programme: BCom Option: Supply Chain Management

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
07130064 Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences Duration of study: 3 years Total credits: 394
Contact:
Mr W Niemann
[email protected]
+27 (0)124204635

Programme information

The purpose of this option is to equip learners of Supply chain management with the ability to participate in functional management within an integrated supply chain. This includes the disciplines of supply management, production and operations management, warehousing, transport management and supply chain strategy.

Admission requirements

  • To be able to register NSC candidates must comply with the minimum requirements for degree studies as well as with the minimum requirements for the relevant study programme.
  • Life Orientation is excluded when calculating the APS.

Minimum requirements for 2016

Achievement Level

APS

Afrikaans or English

Mathematics

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

5

3

C

C

4

3

D

D

30

 

 

 

Additional requirements

  1. General Regulations G.1 to G.15 (with the exception of Regulation G.11.2(c)) apply to a bachelor's degree.
  2. A student may not take more than the prescribed number of modules per semester unless the Dean decides otherwise.
  3. A student may take a module not listed as an elective module only if the prior approval of the Dean has been obtained.
  4. A student who is in possession of a bachelor's degree may not present any modules passed for that degree for another field of specialisation or degree in this Faculty. (See General Regulations G.8 and G.9)
  5. A module passed at 300-level shall only be recognised for degree purposes if the corresponding prescribed module(s) at 200-level has/have been passed, unless the Dean decides otherwise, with the proviso that the following modules which are offered at 300-level only, are also considered "major subjects": Labour law 311 (ABR 311), Labour relations 320 (ABV 320) and International business management 359 and 369 (OBS 359 and 369); only two 14-week modules, or the equivalent thereof, that are not preceded by the 100- and 200-level modules, may be taken for degree purposes. In other words, at least four 14-week modules must be taken at 300-level that are preceded by the 100- and 200-level, except for modules offered on 200- and 300-level only.
  6. A module already passed may only be repeated with the approval of the Dean.
  7. A module passed may not be taken into account for more than one degree or field of specialisation.
  8. It remains the student's responsibility to ascertain, prior to registration, whether all the modules he/she intends taking can be accommodated in the class, test and examination timetables.
  9. The Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences supports an outcomes-based education system and places a high premium on the development of specific academic competences. Class attendance in all modules and for the full duration of all programmes is therefore compulsory for all students.
  10. The Dean has the right of authorisation regarding matters not provided for in the General Regulations or the Faculty Regulations.

Other programme-specific information

Note: See the alphabetical list of modules for prerequisites of all modules.

#   FRK 122 is a terminating module. Candidates will not be able to continue with Financial accounting in the second or third year.

?   FBS 212 and 222 are terminating modules. Candidates will not be able to continue with Financial management at 300-level.

Specialisation modules: OBS 316 and 326.

"Major subject"
To be considered a "major subject" the equivalent of four 14-week modules, including two at 300-level, must be passed provided that:

  • the following modules which are offered at 300-level only, are also considered "major subjects": Labour law 311 (ABR 311), Labour relations 320 (ABV 320), and International business management 359 and 369 (OBS 359 and 369);
  • only two 14-week modules, or the equivalent thereof, that are not preceded by the 100- and  200-level modules, may be taken for degree purposes. In other words, at least four 14-week modules must be taken at 300-level that are preceded by the 100- and 200-level, except for modules offered on 200- and 300-level only.

Promotion to next study year

According to General Regulation G.3 students have to comply with certain requirements as set by the Faculty Board.

  1. A student must pass at least 4 core semester or 2 core year modules to be admitted to the subsequent year of study.
  2. If a student has passed less than the required minimum of 4 core semester or 2 core year modules, he/she will not be readmitted to the Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences. Such a student may apply in writing to the Faculty's Admissions Committee to be readmitted conditionally – with the proviso that the Admissions Committee may set further conditions with regards to the student's academic progress. The Faculty's Admissions Committee may deny a student's application for readmission.
  3. If a student has been readmitted conditionally, his/her academic progress will be monitored after the first semester examinations to determine whether he/she has complied with the requirements set by the Admissions Committee. If not, his/her studies will be suspended.
  4. A student whose studies have been suspended because of his/her poor academic performance has the right to appeal against the decision of the Faculty's Admissions Committee.
  5. A student may be refused promotion to a subsequent year of study if the prescribed tuition fees are not paid.
  6. A student may be refused admission to the examination, or promotion to a subsequent year of study or promotion in a module (if applicable) if he/ she fails to fulfil the attendance requirements. Class attendance in all modules and for the full duration of all programmes is compulsory for all students.

Pass with distinction

  1. A degree may be awarded with distinction provided the candidate meets the following criteria:
  1. Completes the degree within three years;
  2. Obtains a Cumulative Grade Point Average CGPA) of 75%;
  3. Repeated passed modules will not be considered. The initial pass mark of module will be used when calculating the GPA.
  1. Transferees from other faculties and from other universities  who still complete their bachelor degrees (including credits transferred and recognised from the degrees they registered for originally) within three years will be considered as exceptional cases by the Dean.
  2. The GPA will be not be rounded up to a whole number.
  3. Exceptional cases will be considered by the Dean.

General information

Minimum requirements for bachelor's degrees; semester and year modules; new regulations

  1. Students who commenced their studies before 2015 must complete the programme in terms of the curriculum of the year in which they commenced their studies, or in terms of the curriculum of the year in which they switched to their current field of specialisation. Students who prefer to do so may, however, apply to change over to the latest curriculum, but then they should comply with all the requirements thereof and they may not revert to the regulations of an earlier year.
  2. Students who are registering for a degree programme for the first time in 2015 must take the modules indicated under the particular field of specialisation.

Please note: Only two 14-week modules, or the equivalent thereof, that are not preceded by the 100- and 200-level modules, may be taken for degree purposes. In other words, at least four 14-week modules must be taken at 300-level that are preceded by the 100- and 200-level, except for modules offered on 200- and 300-level only.
It is thus the responsibility of students to ensure before registration, that their curricula comply with all the requirements of the applicable regulations.

Minimum credits: 135

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    Find, evaluate, process, manage and present information resources for academic purposes using appropriate technology. Apply effective search strategies in different technological environments. Demonstrate the ethical and fair use of information resources. Integrate 21st-century communications into the management of academic information.

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  • Module content:

    This module intends to equip students with the competence in reading and writing required in the four high impact modules: Business Management, Financial Accounting, Statistics and Economics. Students will also be equipped to interpret and draw figures and graphs and to do computations and manage relevant formulas. During Semester 1 students engage with the online computer program MyFoundationsLab individually in a flexible learning environment, and during Semester 2 they attend the scheduled contact sessions and do the coursework.                                                                              This module is offered by the Faculty of Humanities.

     

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    Principles of marketing management and marketing instruments, customer centricity,  the process of marketing management, market segmentation, positioning and marketing information systems, environmental analysis, identification of target markets, value creation, positioning strategies, consumer behaviour, relationship marketing, relationship intention, application of product, price, marketing communication and distribution strategies.

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  • Module content:

    This module deals with the core principles of economics. A distinction between macroeconomics and microeconomics is made. A discussion of the market system and circular flow of goods, services and money is followed by a section dealing with microeconomic principles, including demand and supply analysis, consumer behaviour and utility maximisation, production and the costs thereof, and the different market models and firm behaviour. Labour market institutions and issues, wage determination, as well as income inequality and poverty are also addressed. A section of money, banking, interest rates and monetary policy concludes the course.

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  • Module content:

    This module deals with the core principles of economics, especially macroeconomic measurement the private and public sectors of the South African economy receive attention, while basic macroeconomic relationships and the measurement of domestic output and national income are discussed. Aggregate demand and supply analysis stands core to this course which is also used to introduce students to the analysis of economic growth, unemployment and inflation. The microeconomics of government is addressed in a separate section, followed by a section on international economics, focusing on international trade, exchange rates and the balance of payments. The economics of developing countries and South Africa in the global economy conclude the course.

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  • Module content:

    The nature and function of accounting; the development of accounting; financial position; financial result; the recording process; processing of accounting data; treatment of VAT; elementary income statement and balance sheet; flow of documents; accounting systems; introduction to internal control and internal control measures; bank reconciliations; control accounts; adjustments; financial statements of a sole proprietorship; the accounting framework.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to information systems, information systems in organisations, hardware: input, processing, output, software: systems and application software, organisation of data and information, telecommunications and networks, the Internet and Intranet. Transaction processing systems, management information systems, decision support systems, information systems in business and society, systems analysis, systems design, implementation, maintenance and revision.

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  • Module content:

    *Module content will be adapted in accordance with the appropriate degree programme. Only one of KOB 181 - 184 may be taken as a module where necessary for a programme.
    Applied business communication skills.
    Acquiring basic business communication skills will enhance the capabilities of employees, managers and leaders in the business environment. An overview of applied skills on the intrapersonal, dyadic, interpersonal, group (team), organisational, public and mass communication contexts is provided. The practical part of the module (for example, the writing of business reports and presentation skills) concentrates on the performance dimensions of these skills as applied to particular professions.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to business management as a science; the environment in which the enterprise operates; the field of business, the mission and goals of an enterprise; management and entrepreneurship. The choice of a form of enterprise; the choice of products and/or services; profit and cost planning for different sizes of operating units; the choice of location; the nature of production processes and the layout of the plant or operating unit.
    Introduction to and overview of general management, especially regarding the five management tasks: strategic management; contemporary developments and management issues; financial management; marketing and public relations. Introduction to and overview of the value chain model; management of the input; management of the purchasing function; management of the transformation process with specific reference to production and operations management; human resources management and information management; corporate governance and black economic empowerment (BEE).

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  • Module content:

    Responsible leadership and the role of a business in society. The nature and development of entrepreneurship; the individual entrepreneur and characteristics of South African entrepreneurs. Looking at the window of opportunity. Getting started (business start up). Exploring different routes to entrepreneurship: entering a family business, buying a franchise, home-based business and the business buyout. This semester also covers how entrepreneurs can network and find support in their environments. Case studies of successful entrepreneurs - also South African entrepreneurs - are studied.

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  • Module content:

    Descriptive statistics:
    Sampling and the collection of data; frequency distributions and graphical representations. Descriptive measures of location and dispersion.
    Probability and inference:
    Introductory probability theory and theoretical distributions. Sampling distributions. Estimation theory and hypothesis testing of sampling averages and proportions (one and two-sample cases). Identification, use, evaluation and interpretation of statistical computer packages and statistical techniques.

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  • Module content:

    *On its own, STK 113 and 123 will not be recognised for degree purposes, but exemption will be granted for STK 110.
    Data operations and transformations:
    Introductory concepts, the role of statistic, various types of data and the number system. Concepts underlying linear, quadratic, exponential, hyperbolic, logarithmic transformations of quantitative data, graphical representations, solving of equations, interpretations. Determining linear equations in practical situations. Characteristics of logarithmic functions. The relationship between the exponential and logarithmic functions in economic and related problems. Systems of equations in equilibrium. Additional concepts relating to data processing, functions and inverse functions, sigma notation, factorial notation, sequences and series, inequalities (strong, weak, absolute, conditional, double) and absolute values.
    Descriptive statistics – Univariate:
    Sampling and the collection of data, frequency distributions and graphical representations. Descriptive measures of location and dispersion. Introductory probability theory.  Identification, use, evaluation and interpretation of statistical computer packages and statistical techniques.
    The weekly one hour practical is presented during the last seven weeks of the semester.

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  • Module content:

    Multivariate statistics:
    Analysis of variance, categorical data analysis, distribution-free methods, curve fitting, regression and correlation, the analysis of time series and indices.
    Statistical and economic applications of quantitative techniques:
    Systems of linear equations: drafting, matrices, solving and application. Optimisation; linear functions (two and more independent variables), non-linear functions (one and two independent variables). Marginal and total functions. Stochastic and deterministic variables in statistical and economic context: producers' and consumers' surplus, distribution functions, probability distributions, probability density functions. Identification, use, evaluation, interpretation of statistical computer packages and statistical techniques.
    This module is also presented as an anti-semester bilingual module.

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  • Module content:

    *On its own, STK 113 and 123 will not be recognized for degree purposes, but exemption will be granted for STK 110.
    Optimisation techniques with economic applications: Data transformations and relationships with economic applications, operations and rules, linear, quadratic, exponential, hyperbolic and logarithmic functions; systems of equations in equilibrium, system of linear inequalities, solving of linear programming problems by means of the graphical and extreme point methods. Applications of differentiation and integration in statistic and economic related problems: the limit of a function, continuity, rate of change, the derivative of a function, differentiation rules, higher order derivatives, optimisation techniques, the area under a curve and applications of definite integrals. Probability and inference: Theoretical distributions. Sampling distributions.  Estimation theory and hypothesis testing of sampling averages and proportions (one-sample and two-sample cases). Identification, use, evaluation and interpretation of statistical computer packages and statistical techniques. The weekly one hour practical is presented during the last seven weeks of the semester.

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  • Module content:

    Budgeting, payroll accounting, taxation – income tax and an introduction to other types of taxes, credit and the new Credit Act, insurance, accounting for inventories (focus on inventory and the accounting entries, not calculations), interpretation of financial statements.

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  • Module content:

    E-marketing, services marketing, not-for-profit marketing, business-to-business marketing, retailing, global marketing.

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Minimum credits: 138

Fundamental modules

  • Module content:

    In this module students are equipped with an understanding of the moral issues influencing human agency in economic and political contexts. In particular philosophy equips students with analytical reasoning skills necessary to understand and solve complex moral problems related to economic and political decision making. We demonstrate to students how the biggest questions concerning the socio-economic aspects of our lives can be broken down and illuminated through reasoned debate. Examples of themes which may be covered in the module include justice and the common good, a moral consideration of the nature and role of economic markets on society, issues concerning justice and equality, and dilemmas of loyalty. The works of philosophers covered may for instance include that of Aristotle, Locke, Bentham, Mill, Kant, Rawls, Friedman, Nozick, Bernstein, Dworkin, Sandel, Walzer, and MacIntyre.

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Core modules

  • Module content:

    Basic principles of law of contract. Law of sales, credit agreements, lease.

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  • Module content:

    Labour law. Aspects of security law. Law of insolvency. Entrepreneurial law; company law, law concerning close corporations. Law of partnerships.

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  • Module content:

    Logistics management
    The role of logistics in an enterprise; definition and scope of customer service; electronic and other logistics information systems; inventory management; materials management with special reference to Japanese systems; management of the supply chain. Methods of transport and transport costs; types and costs of warehousing; electronic aids in materials handling; cost and price determination of purchases; organising for logistics management; methods for improving logistics performance.

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  • Module content:

    *Only for BCom (Option: Supply Chain Management) students
    The role of purchasing in the supply chain, decisionmaking in purchasing, the purchasing process, markets and products, purchasing intelligence, outsourcing and risk management, sourcing strategy, new product development and quality control, purchasing performance management, supplier assessment, negotiating techniques and facilities management and buying of services.

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  • Module content:

    Project management: Introduction
    Project management concepts; needs identification; the project, the project manager and the project team; types of project organisations; project communication and documentation.
    Planning and control: planning, scheduling and schedule control of projects; resource considerations and allocations; cost planning and performance evaluation.

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  • Module content:

    *Only for BCom (Option: Supply Chain Management) students
    Operations strategy and competitiveness; process analysis, product design and process selection; manufacturing; services; total quality management; operations reengineering; supply chain strategy; capacity management; just-in-time systems; forecasting; aggregate sales and operation planning; inventory control; operational scheduling; material requirements planning and theory of constraints.

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  • Module content:

    Role and environment of managerial finance; Financial statement analysis; Cash flow and financial planning; Time value of money; Risk and return. Capital investment decisions; Working capital management.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to management accounting; Cost terms, concepts and classifications; Job-order costing; Process costing; Cost behaviour; Variable versus absorption costing; Cost-volume profit relationships; Budgeting.

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Minimum credits: 120

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Human resource management and development
    The environment in which human resource management takes place; job analysis; strategic human resource planning; equal employment opportunities; planning and management of training; development and careers; functioning in a global environment.
    Negotiation and collective bargaining
    The nature of negotiation; preparation for negotiation; negotiating for purposes of climate creation; persuasive communication; handling conflict and aggression; specialised negotiation and collective bargaining in the South African context.

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  • Module content:

    *Only for BCom (Option: Supply Chain Management) students
    The transport environment; model selection and intermodel combinations; fundamental transport economics; transport planning; transport operations; transport legislation; transport strategies; warehouse methodologies; warehouse location and design; material handling equipment; warehouse operations; key performance indications and performance requirements.

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  • Module content:

    Strategic management analysis and formulation
    Basic concepts; formulation of mission; policy and objectives; external evaluation of the business environment; internal evaluation of the enterprise; including intellectual assets; the formulation and development of a strategic plan.
    Strategic management implementation
    The role of management in strategy implementation; budgets as instrument in the implementation process; leading processes of change within enterprises; supporting policies, procedures and information systems for implementation in the various functional areas; evaluation and control of implementation.

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  • Module content:

    *Only for BCom (Option: Supply Chain Management) students
    Corporate alignments; competitive positioning; customer service design; strategy design; channel strategy; network design; supply chain relationships; supply chain desig; supplier alignment; operations alignment; distribution alignment; demand alignment and logistics information systems.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to international management
    International business management; the process of internationalisation; growth in international trade and investment; the evolution of multinational enterprises; management perspectives on international trade and international trade theories; international trade regulation; economic integration; the formation of trading blocks, and free-trade areas.
    The international business environment
    The cultural environment of international business; the political and legal environments as well as the economic environment of international business; the international monetary system; the foreign exchange market; and international capital markets.

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  • Module content:

    International financial management
    Purpose, scope and principles of international financial management; international cashflow management; foreign exchange risk and foreign exchange risk management; international investment and financing decisions; import and export management; import and export financing, and international purchasing and sourcing.
    International management, leadership and market entry
    International management and leadership; dimensions of strategic international human resource management; international market entry and introduction to international marketing strategy, and future perspectives on Southern Africa as an emerging market.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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