Yearbooks

Programme: BSc Food Management (4 years)

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
02133384 Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences Duration of study: 4 years Total credits: 587

Admission requirements

  •  In order to register NSC/IEB/Cambridge candidates must comply with the minimum requirements for degree studies as well as the minimum requirements for the relevant study programme. 
  • Life Orientation is excluded in the calculation of the Admission Point Score (APS).
  • Grade 11 results are used for the provisional admission of prospective students.
  • Final admission is based on the Grade 12 results.

 

Minimum requirements for 2016
Achievement level
Afrikaans or English Mathematics Physical Sciences APS
NSC/IEB HIGCSE AS-Level A-Level NSC/IEB HIGCSE AS-Level A-Level NSC/IEB HIGCSE AS-Level A-Level
5 3 C C 5 3 C C 5 3 C C 30
 
Candidates who do not comply with the minimum admission requirements may be considered for admission to the BScAgric or the BSc (Four-year Programme) based on the results of the NBT. Please note that students who are placed in the BSc (Four-year Programme) will take a minimum of five years to complete the BSc Agric study programme.

 

Other programme-specific information

Students may enrol for AIM 111 and AIM 121 instead of AIM 101 (the same content presented over 2 semesters)

Elective module FST 413 may be substituted with VDS 414 

Elective module VDS 427 may be substituted with VDS 424

 

Electives are chosen as follows:

Fourth year – 47/56 credits 

 

Internship

OPI 400 (Experiential training in industry): During the first to fourth years of study, students must complete a total of 480 hours experiential training in the industry to develop practical and occupational skills, participate in community engagement and provide service learning. This is equal to 3 weeks x 40 hours (120 hours) per year, according to requirements as determine by the head of department. These “credits” must be successfully completed together with a complete portfolio before the degree will be conferred. Please note: Various practical and industry interaction activities support the theoretical component of VDS 414 & VDS 424, VDS 413 and FST 413 and take place after hours to develop practical and industry skills.

A student must pass all the minimum prescribed and elective module credits as set out at the end of each year within a programme as well as the total required credits to comply with the particular degree programme. Please refer to the curricula of the respective programmes. At least 144 credits must be obtained at 300-/400-level, or otherwise as indicated by curriculum. The minimum module credits needed to comply with degree requirements is set out at the end of each study programme. Subject to the programmes as indicated a maximum of 150 credits will be recognised at 100-level. A student may, in consultation with the Head of Department and subject to the permission by the Dean, select or replace prescribed module credits not indicated in BSc three-year study programmes to the equivalent of a maximum of 36 module credits.

It is important that the total number of prescribed module credits is completed during the course of the study programme. The Dean may, on the recommendation of the Head of Department, approve deviations in this regard. Subject to the programmes as indicated in the respective curricula, a student may not register for more than 75 module credits per semester at first-year level subject to permission by the Dean. A student may be permitted to register for up to 80 module credits in a the first semester during the first year provided that he or she obtained a final mark of no less than 70% for grade 12 Mathematics and achieved an APS of 34 or more in the NSC.

Students who are already in possession of a bachelor’s degree, will not receive credit for modules of which the content overlap with modules from the degree that was already conferred. Credits will not be considered for more than half the credits passed previously for an uncompleted degree. No credits at the final-year or 300- and 400-level will be granted.

The Dean may, on the recommendation of the programme manager, approve deviations with regard to the composition of the study programme.

Please note: Where elective modules are not specified, these may be chosen from any modules appearing in the list of modules.

It remains the student’s responsibility to acertain, prior to registration, whether they comply with the prerequisites of the modules they want to register for.

The prerequisites are listed in the Alphabetical list of modules.

Promotion to next study year

A student will be promoted to the following year of study if he or she passed 100 credits of the prescribed credits for a year of study, unless the Dean on the recommendation of the head of department decides otherwise. A student who does not comply with the requirements for promotion to the following year of study, retains the credit for the modules already passed and may be admitted by the Dean, on recommendation of the head of department, to modules of the following year of study to a maximum of 48 credits, provided that it will fit in with both the lecture and examination timetable.

General promotion requirements in the faculty
All students whose academic progress is not acceptable can be suspended from further studies.

  • A student who is excluded from further studies in terms of the stipulations of the abovementioned regulations, will be notified in writing by the Dean or Admissions Committee at the end of the relevant semester.
  • A student who has been excluded from further studies may apply in writing to the Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences for re-admission.
  • Should the student be re-admitted by the Admissions Committee, strict conditions will be set which the student must comply with in order to proceed with his/her studies.
  • Should the student not be re-admitted to further studies by the Admissions Committee, he/she will be informed in writing.
  • Students who are not re-admitted by the Admissions Committee have the right to appeal to the Senior Appeals Committee.
  • Any decision taken by the Senior Appeals Committee is final.

Pass with distinction

A student obtains his or her degree with distinction if a weighted average of at least 75% is obtained in the following modules:

Recipe development and standardisation 413

Consumer aspects of food 417

Food research project 480

Food service management 420

Food science and technology 413

Minimum credits: 134

Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Principles of marketing management and marketing instruments, customer centricity,  the process of marketing management, market segmentation, positioning and marketing information systems, environmental analysis, identification of target markets, value creation, positioning strategies, consumer behaviour, relationship marketing, relationship intention, application of product, price, marketing communication and distribution strategies.

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  • Module content:

    Simple statistical analysis: Data collection and analysis: Samples, tabulation, graphical representation, describing location, spread and skewness. Introductory probability and distribution theory. Sampling distributions and the central limit theorem. Statistical inference: Basic principles, estimation and testing in the one- and two-sample cases (parametric and non-parametric). Introduction to experimental design. One- and twoway designs, randomised blocks. Multiple statistical analysis: Bivariate data sets: Curve fitting (linear and non-linear), growth curves. Statistical inference in the simple regression case. Categorical analysis: Testing goodness of fit and contingency tables. Multiple regression and correlation: Fitting and testing of models. Residual analysis. Computer literacy: Use of computer packages in data analysis and report writing.

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  • Module content:

    General introduction to inorganic, analytical and physical chemistry. Atomic structure and periodicity. Molecular structure and chemical bonding using the VSEOR model. Nomenclature of iorganic ions and compounds. Classification of reactions: precipitation, acid-base, redox reactions and gas-forming reactions. Mole concept and stoichiometric calculations concerning chemical formulas and chemical reactions. Principles of reactivity: energy and chemical reactions. Physical behaviour gases, liquids, solids and solutions and the role of intermolecular forces. Rate of reactions: Introduction to chemical kinetics.

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  • Module content:

    Theory: General physical-analytical chemistry: Physical behaviour of gases, liquids and solids, intermolecular forces, solutions. Principles of reactivity: energy and chemical reactions, entropy and free energy, electrochemistry. Organic chemistry: Structure (bonding), nomenclature, isomerism, introductory stereochemistry, introduction to chemical reactions and chemical properties of organic compounds and biological compounds, i.e. carbohydrates and amino acids. Practical: Molecular structure (model building), synthesis and properties of simple organic compounds.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction (terminology and anatomical orientation); chemical principles; cytology and histology; neuro-physiology and the senses; haematology and body fluids; cardiovascular system.

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  • Module content:

    Respiratory system; nutrition; digestion and metabolism; kidneys and acid-base equilibrium; endocrinology; reproduction physiology and reproduction; skin and body temperatures.

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  • Module content:

    The module will introduce the student to the field of Microbiology. Basic Microbiological aspects that will be covered include introduction into the diversity of the microbial world (bacteria, archaea, eukaryotic microorganisms and viruses), basic principles of cell structure and function, microbial nutrition and microbial growth and growth control. Applications in Microbiology will be illustrated by specific examples i.e. bioremediation, animal-microbial symbiosis, plant-microbial symbiosis and the use of microorganisms in industrial microbiology. Wastewater treatment, microbial diseases and food will be introduced using specific examples.

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  • Module content:

    Introductory study of the ultra structure, function and composition of representative cells and cell components. General principles of cell metabolism, molecular genetics, cell growth, cell division and differentiation.

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  • Module content:

    Module 1:  Basic food preparation and food preparation techniques. Mise en place, weighing and measurement techniques, equipment and terminology as applied in food preparation. History of the foodservice industry and contemporary chefs. Basic food quality control.
    Module 2: Food preparation basics of the following: stocks, soups and sauces

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  • Module content:

    *Students will not be credited for more than one of the following modules for their degree: WTW 134, WTW 165, WTW 114, WTW 158. WTW 134 does not lead to admission to Mathematics at 200 level and is intended for students who require Mathematics at 100 level only. WTW 134 is offered as WTW 165 in the second semester only to students who have applied in the first semester of the current year for the approximately 65 MBChB, or the 5-6 BChD places becoming available in the second semester and who were therefore enrolled for MGW 112 in the first semester of the current year.        Functions, derivatives, interpretation of the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of differentiation, integration, interpretation of the definite integral, applications of integration. Matrices, solutions of systems of equations. All topics are studied in the context of applications.

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  • Module content:

    Module 1:  Principles and practices of food preparation  and cooking techniques. Mise en place, weighing and measurement techniques, equipment and terminology as applied in food preparation. Basic food quality control.
    Module 2: Food preparation basics of the following: starches and cereals

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Minimum credits: 136

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Structural and ionic properties of amino acids. Peptides, the peptide bond, primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins. Interactions that stabilise protein structure, denaturation and renaturation of proteins. Introduction to methods for the purification of proteins, amino acid composition, and sequence determinations. Introduction to enzyme kinetics and enzyme inhibition. Allosteric enzymes, regulation of enzyme activity, active centres and mechanisms of enzyme catalysis. Examples of industrial applications of enzymes. Practical training in laboratory techniques and Good Laboratory Practice. Techniques for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of biological molecules. Processing and presentation of scientific data.

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  • Module content:

    Biochemistry of carbohydrates. Thermodynamics and bioenergetics. Glycolysis, citric acid cycle and electron transport. Glycogen metabolism, pentose-phosphate pathway, gluconeogenesis and photosynthesis. Practical training in study and analysis of metabolic pathways and enzymes. Scientific method and design: Hypothesis design and testing, method design and scientific controls.

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  • Module content:

    Biochemistry of lipids, membrane structure, anabolism and catabolism of lipids. Nitrogen metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis and catabolism. Biosynthesis of neurotransmitters, pigments, hormones and nucleotides from amino acids. Catabolism of pureness and pyrimidines. Therapeutic agents directed against nucleotide metabolism. Examples of inborn errors of metabolism of nitrogen containing compounds. The urea cycle, nitrogen excretion. Practical training in scientific writing skills: evaluation of a scientific report. Techniques for separation and analysis of biological molecules

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  • Module content:

    Biochemistry of nutrition and toxicology. Proximate analysis of nutrients. Review of energy requirements and expenditure. Respiratory quotient. Requirements and function of water, vitamins and minerals. Interpretation and modification of RDA values for specific diets, eg growth, exercise, pregnancy and lactation, aging and starvation. Interactions between nutrients. Comparison of monogastric and ruminant metabolism. Cholesterol, polyunsaturated, essential fatty acids and dietary anti-oxidants. Oxidation of fats. Biochemical mechanisms of water- and fat-soluble vitamins and assessment of vitamin status. Mineral requirements, biochemical mechanisms, imbalances and diarrhoea. Biochemistry of xenobiotics: absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME); detoxification reactions: oxidation/reduction (Phase I), conjugations (Phase II), export from cells (Phase III); factors affecting metabolism and disposition. Toxic responses: tissue damage and physiological effects, teratogenesis, immunotoxicity, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Examples of toxins: biochemical mechanisms of common toxins and their antidotes. Antibiotics and resistance. Natural toxins from fungi, plants and animals: goitrogens, cyanogens, cholineesterase inhibitors, ergotoxin, aflatoxins  Practical training in analyses of nutrients, fatty acids separations, antioxidant determination, and enzyme activity measurements, PO ratio of mitochondria, electrophoresis, extraction, solubility and gel permeation techniques.

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  • Module content:

    Lectures: Food preservation technologies: concept of hurdle technology; heat (blanching, pasteurisation and sterilisation); cold (refrigeration and freezing); concentration and dehydration; food irradiation; fermentation; preservatives; new methods of food preservation. Effect of various food preservation technologies on the microbiological (shelf-life and safety issues), sensory and nutritional quality of foods. Practicals: Practical applications of above processes. Physical, chemical and sensory evaluation of processed foods. Assignment: Application of hurdle technology concept to a specific food product.

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  • Module content:

    Growth, replication and survival of bacteria, Energy sources, harvesting from light versus oxidation, regulation of catabolic pathways, chemotaxis. Nitrogen metabolism, iron-scavenging. Alternative electron acceptors: denitrification, sulphate reduction, methanogenesis.  Bacterial evolution, systematic and genomics. Biodiversity; bacteria occurring in the natural environment (soil, water and air), associated with humans, animals, plants, and those of importance in foods and in the water industry.

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  • Module content:

    Module 1: The study of different food systems with regard to food preparation. Physical and chemical properties and the influence of the composition in food preparation.
    Module 2: Food preparation basics of the following: soups and sauces, fruit and vegetables; salads; frozen desserts; gelatine.
    Module 3: Origin and development of food habits; Factors influencing habits and choice; Dynamics of food habits. Influence of religion on food habits. Food habits of different ethnic groups.

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  • Module content:

    Module 1: The study of different food systems with regard to food preparation. Physical and chemical properties and the influence of the composition in food preparation.
    Module 2:  Food preparation basics of the following: meat; poultry; fish, legumes, eggs and milk, baked products (whole spectrum); leavening agents.
    Module 3: The influence of culture on cuisines. Study of the cuisines of selected African, European and Eastern countries.

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  • Module content:

    Internal and external influencing factors of consumer behaviour, the consumer's decision process and application fields of consumer behaviour, consumerisms and social responsibility, buying behaviour of consumers in both product and service related industries, consumer psychology and the influence thereof on buying behaviour, psychology of pricing, influencing factors in consumer buying behaviour, the impact of various forms of marketing communication on buying behaviour.

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  • Module content:

    Primary sources of migroorganisims in food. Factors affecting the growth and survival of microorganisms in food. Microbial quality, spoilage and safety of food. Different organisms involved, their isolation, screening and detection. Conventional approaches, alternative methods rapid methods. Food fermentations: fermentation types, principles and organisms involved.

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Minimum credits: 140

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Lectures - Chemistry of major food components: Carbohydrates. Proteins. Lipids. Water. Chemical and nutritional aspects of food processing: implications of different processing techniques on the major food components. Functional properties of the major food components. Modification of functional properties of the major food components. Food analysis methodology. Practical work: Food analysis.

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  • Module content:

    Lectures - Basic food analysis and chemistry of the minor food components: Basic food analysis, vitamins, minerals, additives, contaminants. Chemical and nutritional aspects of food processing: implications of different processing techniques on minor food components. Functional properties of the minor food components. Food analysis methodology. Practical work: Food analysis.

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  • Module content:

    Planning and layout of food service units for different food service systems. Equipment for food services. Factors influencing the choice and purchasing of equipment for different food service units. Hygiene and safety in food services. management in food service systems. Financial management in food services.

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  • Module content:

    The study of nutrients and water regarding their chemical composition, characteristics, basic digestion, absorption, metabolism, functions, food sources and symptoms of deficiency and toxicity. Energy metabolism. Dietary recommendations and guidelines, dietary guides and meal planning. The use and application of food composition tables in dietary analysis.

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  • Module content:

    The role of nutrition in the life cycle. The role of nutrition in the prevention of lifestyle related diseases - osteoporosis, cancer, coronary heart disease, tooth decay. Vegetarianism. Different conditions of malnutrition: Protein Energy Malnutrition and obesity.

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  • Module content:

    Planning executing and reporting consumer food research. Food preservation and evaluation techniques. Experiments in food, emphasizing ingredient function and standard preparation methods. Application of experimental methods through which the chemical and physical reactions of food to different food handling, preparation and preservation techniques are illustrated. Quality evaluation and consumer orientated sensory evaluation of food products.

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  • Module content:

    Module 1: Restaurant management. Table setting, table serving, wine service, food and wine pairing, beverage management
    Module 2: Menu planning for different food service systems and styles of food service.
    Module 3: Large scale food procurement, consumption and storage.
    Practical work: Principles of large-scale food preparation and the practical application thereof in a practical restaurant situation. Recipe formats and adjustment applicable to large-scale food preparation. Work scheduling and the practical exposure to the use of large scale catering equipment in a real life situation.

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Minimum credits: 178

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Principles and applications of sensory evaluation. Types of panels, tests and test conditions and their functions. Selection and training of panellists for descriptive sensory evaluation. Instrumental sensory quality measurements. Statistical analysis and interpretation of data. Practicals: Practical aspects and execution of sensory evaluation techniques, analysis and interpretation of data. Instrumental sensory quality measurements.

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  • Module content:

    Lectures: Principles involved and steps that are followed to develop new food products that are safe, tasty, nutritious and cost effective. Application of the theory of food product development. Quality management systems with specific reference to Good Manufacturing Practices, HACCP and ISO 9000. National and international standards, Codex Alimentarius, FDA. Application of food legislation. Food Packaging. Practicals: A product development project will be planned, conducted and presented. Application and implementation of HACCP.

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  • Module content:

    Five-day intensive research methodology workshop: Philosophy of research; Where to start research - Problem statement; Role and importance of the literature review; How to formulate hypotheses and objectives; Experimental design; The good practical way to do research, including getting the results down; Application of statistics to research; Writing an honours report/masters dissertation/doctoral thesis; Writing a scientific paper; Preparing and presenting posters and oral papers.

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  • Module content:

    The professional food service manager’s roles, responsibilities and characteristics. Contemporary leadership and management styles in food service systems. Professionalism and ethics. Advanced food service systems and production management techniques and training facilitation. Marketing of  food services.

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  • Module content:

    Recipe development process. Development of appropriate recipes and food products for a given situation. Standardisation of recipes. Food styling and food photography.

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  • Module content:

    Advanced food preparation and presentation techniques.

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  • Module content:

    Advanced food preparation and presentation techniques. Event planning and banqueting.

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  • Module content:

    During the first  to fourth years of study  students must complete a total of 600 hours experiential training in the industry to develop practical and occupational skills, participate in community engagement and provide service learning. . This is equal to 3 weeks x40 hours (120 hours) per year for the first to third year and 6 weeks x 40 hours in the fourth year to include event management, according to requirements as determine d by the head of department. These "credits" include evidence of experiential training , service learning and community engagment during the four years of the degree programme and  must be successfully completed together with a complete portfolio before the degree will be conferred. Please note: Various practical and industry- interaction activities support the theoretical component of VDS 322, 413, 414, 417, 424, 427, FST 412 and TBE 311 (as applicable to the respective Consumer Science programmes)  and take place after hours to develop practical and industry skills,

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  • Module content:

    Module 1 : Role playing factors relating to consumer behaviour, food procurement and consumption. The introduction of the 2011 Consumer protection act and food labelling laws.  Consumer education in relation to consumers’ social responsibility.
    Module  2: A South African perspective on food retail management with a focus on how general logistics throughout the supply chain is implemented with the South African consumer in mind.

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  • Module content:

    Aspects of food retailing with regard to display, presentation and shop layout as applied to food products. Practical application of the principles in visual merchandising of food and food retailing in the food industry.

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  • Module content:

    Research methodology. Planning, executing and reporting a research project in Food Management / Hospitality  Management /Food Retail Management.

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  • Module content:

    Research methodology. Planning, executing and reporting a research project in Food Management/Hospitality Management/Food Retail Management.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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