Yearbooks

Programme: MA African Languages (Coursework)

Code Faculty Duration Credits
01250442 Faculty of Humanities Duration of study: 2 years Total credits: 200
Contact:
Prof E Taljard
[email protected]
+27 (0)124202494

Admission requirements

- An approved honours degree in one of the African languages with an average of at least 60%; or at the programme managers’ discretion; or

- An approved four-year bachelor’s degree or other equivalent tertiary qualification – with the approval of Senate (worth 480 credits) in an appropriate discipline with focus on the African languages.

Prospective students may be required to submit an admissions essay as a condition for admission or to do additional work/modules to enable them to reach the desired level of study.

 

Minimum credits: 100

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Historical development of dialectological theory and practice: theoretical perspectives on dialectology. Variation in language. The relationship between dialectology and linguistics. Study of the linguistic features of selected dialects of the Sotho and Nguni languages.

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  • Module content:

    Different theoretical approaches to the analysis of the drama of the Nguni and Sotho languages.

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  • Module content:

    Creative writing in an African language – isiNdebele, isiZulu, Sepedi or Setswana – for students interested in writing original, creative work of their own. The module aims at guiding and assisting students in producing a portfolio of creative work of a high standard which may include fiction, drama, poetry and biographical or autobiographical writing. Students will be expected to attend a number of workshops at the Hatfield Campus.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to basic lexicographical concepts; typology of the dictionary; structure of the lexicon; prescriptiveness vs descriptiveness of dictionaries; needs assessment; problematic aspects of lemmatisation; corpus building; cross-referencing as lexicographic device; introduction to specialised lexicography.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to core aspects of human language technology in lexicography and natural language processing focusing on the compilation and manipulation of corpora and the building and validation of spellcheckers and the use, compilation and monitoring of usage, of paper, electronic and internet dictionaries.

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  • Module content:

    Advanced translation principles and practice. Students apply their knowledge of the use of HLT (human language technology) in translation practice. Specialisation in various types of translation such as technical translation, legal translation, literary translation (prose and/or poetry), administrative translation (service prose), translation of advertisements, etc. Students choose their field(s) of specialisation in consultation with the lecturer, using any language combination offered by the Language Departments, provided that the particular language combination can be accommodated during any given year. Where possible, practising translators specialising in the various types of translation are invited to participate in the module.

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  • Module content:

    *Students are encouraged to take undergraduate modules from the political sciences and international studies programmes for non-degree purposes.
    Introduction to interpreting practice
    This first-semester module aims at familiarising students with the skills involved in oral translation. Lectures will focus on the theory and practice of various interpreting techniques including oral summaries, sight translations and reformulations of oral texts and speeches and the practice of liaison interpreting in professional situations. Students will also be expected to split up in groups according to the working languages of their choice which, besides English, may consist of any language(s) offered at MA level. Students will be subject to an oral exam to test their mastery of these techniques.

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  • Module content:

    Students who have passed the TRL 811 module may specialise in interpreting in the second semester.
    The focus of this second-semester module is on practising the notetaking technique required for professional interpreting. Students attend both general TRL lectures primarily presented in English and practical group sessions according to their various working languages. Students will be evaluated through an oral exam.

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  • Module content:

    *Students specialising in interpreting may take this module if they have passed the module TRL 812.
    Lectures include the theory and practice of simultaneous conference interpreting of oral texts and speeches. This technique will be mastered through various techniques and practice in an interpreting booth (in the student’s working languages) will conclude this module. Students will be evaluated through an oral exam.

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  • Module content:

    *This module is compulsory for students who wish to do their mini-dissertation with a focus on translation.
    Study of the main characteristics of, and comparison between various translation models, such as text-oriented, functional, process-centred and reception-based translation. The shift from prescriptive theory to descriptive work in the field of translation studies. Corpus-based translation studies (CTS); theory and practice; the use and application of HLT (human language technology) in CTS.

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Minimum credits: 100

Core modules

  • Module content:

    The mini-dissertation should be the product of independent research on any of the following themes: linguistics (African languages), literature (African languages), teaching of African languages, translation, lexicographical and/or terminological issues pertaining to the African languages. Apart from an analysis and interpretation of research results, the mini-dissertation should include a thorough overview of the literature on the selected topic and a synthesis of existing views as reflected in the literature.
    Length: 18 000–20 000 words.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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