Yearbooks

Programme: BSocial Work Social Work

Code Faculty Duration Credits Download
01130143 Faculty of Humanities Duration of study: 4 years Total credits: 675
Contact:
Prof LS Geyer
[email protected]
+27 (0)124202648

Programme information

The purpose of this integrated programme is to provide qualifiers with professional training for a career in social work. The theoretical training goes hand in hand with appropriate practical skills training.

Admission requirements

  •  Candidates who achieved an APS of 30 in Grade 11 and comply with the minimum subject requirements and achievement levels of these study programmes will automatically be granted placement in the study programmes subject to the availability of space. The above-mentioned is not applicable to selection programmes.
  •  To retain admission learners will be expected to obtain an APS of at least 28 in Grade 12. Prospective students who have already been granted provisional admission in these study programmes but obtained at least an APS of 27 in Grade 12 will be considered by the Admission Committee should space be available. The Admission Committee of the Faculty of Humanities will consider these students once the results of the National Benchmark Test (NBT) are available and depending on the availability of space.
  • The Faculty will assess satisfactory performance in the NBT in the light of its commitment to ensure that an appropriate proportion of the applicants will be drawn from the historically disadvantaged category of the population.
  • Applicants with an APS of 30 but who do not comply with the subject requirements must write the NBT.
  • Life Orientation is excluded when calculating the APS.

Minimum requirements for 2016

Achievement Level

APS

Afrikaans or English

NSC/IEB

HIGCSE

AS-Level

A-Level

5

3

C

C

30

 

Other programme-specific information

  • Students who are deemed to be at risk of their level of academic literacy are compelled to take ALL 110 and ALL 125.
  • Students who are deemed NOT to be at risk of their level of academic literacy are compelled to take language modules to the value of 12 credits from the list of language modules (see Academic literacy).
  • In order to be admitted to year level 2, students are selected according to academic achievement, psychometric tests and a personal interview which carry an equal weight. This selection process applies also to students from other universities applying for continuation of the social work studies at UP. Further information is available from the programme coordinator.
  • No student will be allowed to commence with the fourth-year level modules before the successful completion of all the social work modules up to the third-year level of study as well as at least eighty per cent (80%) of the additional required modules for the programme.
  • Elective modules: Select modules from the list to the value of 140 credits. 80 credits must be at yr level 2 and 60 credits at yr level 3. At least one discipline must be taken at yr levels 1, 2 and 3.

Note:

-    If Criminology is selected up to third-year level, apart from all of the abovementioned Criminology modules, students also have to take SLK 220 and SOC 220.

-    If Psychology is selected up to third-year level, apart from all of the abovementioned Psychology modules, students also have to take KRM 210 and SOC 220.

-    If Sociology is selected up to third-year level, apart from all of the abovementioned Sociology modules, students also have to take KRM 210 and SLK 220.

Minimum credits: 138

Fundamental modules

Core modules

  • Module content:

    Part 1: Fundamental criminology
    Introduction to criminology, definition of crime, crime tendencies, classical and positivistic explanations of crime.
    Part 2: Violent crime
    A brief analysis of causes, consequences and mechanisms to prevent and reduce violent crime within a South African context. Define violent crime in terms of interpersonal violence, homicide, violent crimes within the criminal justice system and property-related violent crimes.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Penology
    In Penology attention is given to the criminal justice system to emphasise the importance of using an integrated approach in the handling of offenders.  The impact of overpopulation in prisons is critically evaluated. Attention is also given to awaiting trial offenders, the importance of community-based sentences as well as the re-integration of offenders in the community.
    Part 2: Crime prevention and control
    Responsibilities of the police and the community in crime prevention and control. Primary, secondary and tertiary crime prevention, crime prevention and reduction strategies in South Africa.

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  • Module content:

    Integration of social work theory and practice within a developmental social work perspective; relevance and exposure to volunteerism and cultural diversity. Introduction to welfare services in practice and different fields of service delivery. Application of social work intervention in the community by means of a situation analysis. Intervention with groups and individuals by means of roleplaying in a laboratory setting. Life-skills training regarding a holistic balanced life style, human sexuality and HIV/Aids, conflict management, self-image and skills involved in public speaking.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Developmental social work
    The origin and nature, of social welfare and social work from a national and international perspective. Socio-economic problems, target groups, specialised fields, intervention levels (individual, family, group and community), service providers and role players in the South African context.  Developmental social welfare; principles, values, goal and functions of social work within a developmental perspective.  Cultural sensitive social work practice.
    Part 2: Social work intervention: Community
    Nature and characteristics of social work intervention with communities; exploration of the components of communities and community work; the value of ecosystems theory in community work; composition of a community profile and the principles of social work services to communities  to enhance community participation
    Part 3: Social work intervention: Community
    Nature and characteristics of social work intervention with communities; exploration of the components of communities and community work; the value of the ecosystems and strengths perspective theory in community work; composition of a community profile and the principles of social work services to communities to enhance community mobilisation and participation.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Social work intervention: Individual and group
    Characteristic features of the helping relationship; the communication process; basic interpersonal skills and exploring skills in social work intervention with individuals. Different types of groups; group dynamics; leadership and basic skills for group leaders in social work intervention with groups.
    Part 2: Family development and assistance
    Families: The life cycle of the family, tasks and behaviour of the members of the family. The focus is on the social, economic, religious and cultural diversity of families and causes of family disorganisation.

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  • Module content:

    This module is a general orientation to Psychology. An introduction is given to various theoretical approaches in Psychology, and the development of Psychology as a science is discussed. Selected themes from everyday life are explored and integrated with psychological principles. This module focuses on major personality theories. An introduction is given to various paradigmatic approaches in Psychology.

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  • Module content:

    This module introduces the student to a basic knowledge and understanding of the biological basis of human behaviour. The module addresses the key concepts and terminology related to the biological subsystem, the rules and principles guiding biological psychology, and identification of the interrelatedness of different biological systems and subsystems. In this module various cognitive processes are studied, including perception, memory, thinking, intelligence and creativity. Illustrations are given of various thinking processes, such as problem solving, critical, analytic and integrative thinking.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: The individual and society
    An introduction to sociology, the classical sociological paradigm and the principles of sociological research.

    Part 2: The making of the South African order

    This section explores key factors involved in the making and shaping of the contemporary South African social order and considers the sociological implications thereof. Students will be introduced to the political economy of South Africa, with an emphasis on the nature of South Africa’s industrialisation, the process of proletarianisation and the introduction of the migration labour system. In addition, the racial state, the foundations of its social project, and the spatial form of its 20th century racial modernity will be considered.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: The sociology of institutions

    An introduction to the social dynamics of institutions such as the family, the state, the economy, religion, education, and civil society, with specific focus on Southern Africa.

    Part 2: Social stratification: Race, class and gender
    The nature and dynamics of social stratification and inequality will be explored. Race, gender and class are the foci of the section. The South African reality in this regard is highlighted.

     

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Minimum credits: 184

Core modules

  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    Preparation, exploring and assessment of client systems’ functioning with an awareness of social work values and issues of diversity. Application of appropriate intervention skills, processes, techniques and models on individuals, groups, families and communities. Evaluation of outcomes and appropriate termination of intervention processes.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    Part 1: Social work intervention: Community
    The mandate of community work and community development within the context of developmental social welfare in South Africa. Studying the process of community work and community development with specific focus on various community assessment approaches, practice models, including the roles and techniques.
    Part 2: Social work intervention: Individual and group
    A theoretical approach to working with individuals and groups in a multi-cultural context; communication skills and phases of the helping process.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    Part 1: Family development and guidance
    Family functioning with special reference to the components of the intimate relationship and behaviour and diversity in families, parenthood and family assessment tools.
    Part 2: Specialist fields
    Social work services with individuals, groups and communities, as well as applicable legislation and social policy with regards to substance abuse and gerontology.

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  • Module content:

    Introduction to business management as a science; the environment in which the enterprise operates; the field of business, the mission and goals of an enterprise; management and entrepreneurship. The choice of a form of enterprise; the choice of products and/or services; profit and cost planning for different sizes of operating units; the choice of location; the nature of production processes and the layout of the plant or operating unit.
    Introduction to and overview of general management, especially regarding the five management tasks: strategic management; contemporary developments and management issues; financial management; marketing and public relations. Introduction to and overview of the value chain model; management of the input; management of the purchasing function; management of the transformation process with specific reference to production and operations management; human resources management and information management; corporate governance and black economic empowerment (BEE).

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  • Module content:

    This module is designed to introduce students to some of the legal aspects of particular importance to social workers. The module includes the following components: An introduction to law in general including an overview of the sources of law, the South African court system, the legal profession, legal aid and the procedural law; the law of persons, with specific reference to the commencement and termination of legal subjectivity and the legal status of a person; an introduction to the criminal law and punishment and the role of the social worker in the criminal process.

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  • Module content:

    This module is a continuation of the first module in social welfare law which aims to familiarise students with certain aspects of the law of particular importance to social workers. The module consists of the following components: an introduction to the matrimonial law, the matrimonial property law and the divorce law; parental authority including aspects such as the acquisition, nature, content and interference with parental authority; the role of the social worker in the family law context.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Part 1: Forensic criminalistics
    Crime investigation; obtaining information through communication; post-mortem examinations; serological examinations; fingerprints.
    Part 2: Youth misbehaviour
    Influence of the family, school and peer group; gang behaviour; use of drugs; theoretical explanations, as well as prevention and control of youth misbehaviour.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Victimology
    Scope of victimology, contemporary issues in victimology, position of the victim within the criminal justice system, victim-based legislation, restorative justice. 
    Part 2: Political offences
    The state as offender; crime directed at the state; formal and informal suppression; riots; terrorism; assassination; treason; sexual violence during war; children in organized armed violence and conflict.

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  • Module content:

    In this module human development from conception through adolescence to adulthood is discussed with reference to various psychological theories. Incorporated are the developmental changes related to cognitive, physical, emotional and social functioning of the individual and the context of work in adulthood. Traditional and contemporary theories of human development explaining and describing these stages are studied in order to address the key issues related to both childhood and adulthood.

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  • Module content:

    This module is a social-psychological perspective on interpersonal and group processes. Themes that are covered include communication, pro-social behaviour, social influence and persuasion, political transformation, violence, and group behaviour.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Sociology of work: Globalisation
    The contemporary process of globalisation at a world level impacts on the process of change and economic development. This section will discuss processes and debates associated with economic globalisation and the global dominance of finance capital in the late 20th and early 21st century. We will review contemporary debates associated with these issues.


    Part 2: Gender, family and households

    This section focuses on theories and issues relevant to the understanding of households, families and gender. It addresses thematics such as dynamic family structures, poverty, the survival strategies of poor households, gender-based violence and the ways in which the aforementioned affect family life and forms as well as children and youth in particular. A special emphasis is placed on exploring these issues in a Southern African context.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Demography, health and society
    This section explores the dynamic relationship between demography and health, with examples drawn from South African and international case studies. The substantial increase in world population during the past century compounds key issues faced by contemporary societies. Interplay between demographic processes, such as morbidity, mortality, fertility and mobility, impact on the size of a population. In turn, these are to an extent shaped by the structure of a population as well as the cultural context of a society. Central to this are concerns around health and disease. 

    Part 2: Cultural Sociology

    This section explores themes in cultural sociology, with an emphasis on the ways in which meaning is constructed in everyday life by individuals as well as collectives, on the one hand, and the intersection between culture and institutional forms and social structure on the other. Students will be introduced to the work of some of the key thinkers in the field, and will be provided with the opportunity to write an independent essay on a theme in cultural sociology.

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Minimum credits: 220

Core modules

  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    Plan and implement appropriate social work intervention processes and skills in practice with individuals, families, groups and communities under supervision of a welfare organisation.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    Part 1: Social work intervention: Individual and family
    Theories, models, advanced communication skills, the genogram and the ecochart as intervention techniques and the intervention process as applicable to the individual and the family.
    Part 2: Family development and guidance
    Development of knowledge with regard to the various forms of families and marriages, the family and losses, family violence with regard to marital violence, family murders, the dynamics of the different forms of sexual abuse, the affect of child sexual abuse on the life of the adult person’s life and substitute care.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    Part 1: Methods and skills in community work
    Methods and skills for the community work process in practice within a developmental context: identification of capacities and needs in communities, community participation and involvement, mobilisation of community action; functions and skills of a community project manager; project planning; community project process.
    Part 2: Social work intervention: Group
    Intervention with treatment groups with emphasis on the process and skills; advanced group leadership; theoretical approaches in working with groups.

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  • Module content:

    Responsible leadership and the role of a business in society. The nature and development of entrepreneurship; the individual entrepreneur and characteristics of South African entrepreneurs. Looking at the window of opportunity. Getting started (business start up). Exploring different routes to entrepreneurship: entering a family business, buying a franchise, home-based business and the business buyout. This semester also covers how entrepreneurs can network and find support in their environments. Case studies of successful entrepreneurs - also South African entrepreneurs - are studied.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Social work in health care
    The unique nature, needs and service delivery with regard to social work in health care, mental health care and persons with disability.
    Part 2: Social policy
    An introduction to social policy. The nature, characteristics, scope and process of social policy. Values, ethics and social justice impacting on social policy. Conceptual framework of the policy process.

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    Part 1: Theories of crime
    Theories explaining the causes and different aspects of crime.
    Part 2: Psychocriminology
    Nature of human behaviour; aggression and violence; offenders with mental disorders; sexual offences; terrorism and hostage taking.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Female crime
    Nature and extent of female crime; crimes committed by women; theoretical explanations.
    Part 2: Contemporary criminology issues
    Contemporary crime phenomena such as hate crimes, road rage, corruption, white-collar crimes, organised crime, ecological crime as well as the problems associated with contemporary crimes (e.g. babies behind bars and HIV/Aids) are addressed. In conjunction with this, attention is given to forensic report writing, preparation of children and youths to testify in court and restorative justice.

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  • Module content:

    Identification of abnormal behaviour in children based on knowledge of normal childhood development; introduction to the study of various models pertaining to abnormal behaviour; understanding and application of basic concepts in child psychopathology. This module also provides an introduction to psychopathology and symptomatology of adult abnormal behaviour. Terminology, definitions of abnormal behaviour, problems in diagnosis, labelling, and myths regarding abnormal behaviour are discussed. Neurosis as a specific mental disorder is studied critically from a multidimensional perspective, including intrapsychic, interpersonal and social-cultural explanations.

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  • Module content:

    This module deals with a community psychological perspective on human behaviour and psychological interventions and also critically explores the contribution of various perspectives in psychology. The module focuses on themes such as definitions of key concepts, principles and aims of community psychology, and the role of the community psychologist as well as the impact of earlier thought frameworks on contemporary perspectives. The implications of these ideas for practical initiatives focussed on mental health in communities, are discussed. The module further focuses on critical psychology. Critical psychology is an orientation towards psychology that is critical towards the assumptions and practices of psychology as it is practiced in the mainstream. It attempts to address power issues as they manifest in the practice of mainstream psychology. The focus is on examining how the practice and theories of mainstream psychology contribute to these power issues impacting on marginalised groups.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Social theory

    This section focuses on contemporary social theory, in order to extend and broaden students’ understanding of social theory beyond the classical canon. Students will be introduced to key conceptual vocabularies, theoretical paradigms and contemporary bodies of work in social theory. In addition, the way in which scholars who work on South Africa have drawn on social theory to inform and enrich their work is emphasized. 

    Part 2: Labour studies

    The section addresses sociological approaches to the workplace. It will critically assess labour market policy and examine issues such as management practice, employment and unemployment, and discrimination and flexibility in the labour market in South Africa.

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  • Module content:

    Part 1: Rural and urban sociology

    This section considers the relationship between the rural and urban, against the backdrop of the emergence and development of both capitalism in its various guises and globalisation within the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in the global North and South. Questions on the nature of social interaction in communities, changing ways of relating, inequality and livelihoods, collective action, local cultures and modernities are considered.


    Part 2: Sociology of religion

    This section looks at religion and secularism in social context. Specific emphasis is placed on religion and secularism as forces for social change.

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Minimum credits: 120

Core modules

  • Module content:

    As an intern at a welfare organization, the student has to apply social work theory in social work practice from a developmental frame of reference. The focus will be on interventions with individuals, families, groups and communities. Interventions are aimed at prevention, early intervention, statutory processes and continuum of developmental services, taking into account relevant policy issues from a global and local perspective, while upholding the basic values and principles enshrined in the Bill of Rights in the SA Constitution. Management of own workload.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    Theoretical approaches in advance work with individuals and families; advance skills and techniques in the work with individuals and families; phases of the intervention process in the work with families; theoretical founding of the divorce process, divorce counselling and crisis intervention.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    General principles in social work management with specific reference to functions of social work management, management ethics and management styles. Supervision as a social work management tool with specific reference to the functions, methods and processes of social work supervision.

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  • Module content:

    *Closed – requires departmental selection
    Overview of the context and nature of social welfare and social services in South Africa; practice realities and challenges; importance of partnerships. Emergence of social development against the background of socio-economic and political influences from a global, regional and national perspective. Social justice and change of structural forces of oppression, exclusion and disempowerment through social development. Impact of political economy and environmental challenges on social and funding policies, social development and social services. Relation between social and economic development.

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  • Module content:

    Research concepts, research ethics, types of research, research designs and research process as applicable to social work. Independent research according to a relevant topic.
    The completion of the research process will result in a research report.

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The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of each student to familiarise himself or herself well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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