Yearbooks

Faculty of Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology

Faculty regulations and information

The regulations for the degrees published in this Yearbook are subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information.

The General Academic Regulations and General Student Rules apply to all faculties and registered students of the University, as well as all prospective students who have accepted an offer of a place at the University of Pretoria. On registering for a programme, the student bears the responsibility of ensuring that they familiarise themselves with the General Academic Regulations applicable to their registration, as well as the relevant faculty-specific and programme-specific regulations and information as stipulated in the relevant yearbook. Ignorance concerning these regulations will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression, or basis for an exception to any of the aforementioned regulations.

Please read the faculty regulations in conjunction with the General Academic Regulations.

1. General Admissions Regulations

  • This Admissions Regulation should be read in conjunction with General Academic Regulation G1.1.
  • In order to register for a first bachelor’s degree at the University, a candidate should have completed the National Senior Certificate (NSC) or an equivalent qualification and meet the minimum requirements for admission to bachelor’s degree study.
  • Candidates must also comply with the particular subject and level requirement as well as with the minimum Admission Point Score (APS) for the relevant degree programme.
  • The APS calculation is based on a candidate’s achievement in six 20-credit recognised subjects by using the NSC ratings that is the “1 to 7 scale of achievement”, as explained in the table below. Thus, the highest APS that can be achieved is 42.
  • Life Orientation is a 10-credit subject and is excluded from the calculation when determining the APS.
  • Grade 11 or equivalent results are used in the provisional admission of prospective students.
  • The final NSC or equivalent results will be the determining factor with regard to final admission.
  • All modules will be presented in English, as English is the language of tuition, communication and correspondence of the University.
  • Minimum requirements for admission to the relevant programmes are set out in the “Minimum admission requirements table” of this document.
  • The following subject rating scores are used for calculating the APS (see Annexure A for the APS Conversion Table):

Rating

code

Rating Marks
7 Outstanding achievement 80-100%
6 Meritorious achievement 70-79%
5 Sutstantial achievement 60-69%
4 Adequate achievement 50-59%
3 Moderate achievement 40-49%
2 Elementary achievement 30-39%
1 Not achieved 0-29%

CLOSING DATES

BSc Architecture: All applicants: 31 July
All other degrees - South African citizens: 30 September – Citizens from countries other than South Africa: 31 August

  1. Registration for a specific year (Refer to General Academic Regulation G4)

A student registers for all the modules that they  intend to take in that specific year (first and second-semester modules and year modules) at the beginning of an academic year. Changes to a curriculum at the beginning of the second semester may be made only with the approval of the Dean. Students will be informed of changes to the curriculum by the respective department.

Students must be registered for all modules that they intend to enrol for during the academic year within the first two weeks of the semester in which the module is presented. (See General Academic Regulation G2.4.)

Students who cannot register by the date of commencement of lectures must report to the lecturer no later than the first day of lectures and are responsible to make arrangements to keep up with the learning activities as no catching-up activities and/or assessments will be provided.

Cancellation of modules without financial and student record implications must be done within the first four weeks of the semester in which the module is presented. (See General Academic Regulation G2.5.)

  1. Module credits for unregistered students

There are students who attend lectures, write tests and examinations and in this manner earn “marks”, but have neither registered for modules nor registered as students. These marks will not be communicated to any student before they have provided proof of registration. A student cannot obtain any credits in a specific academic year for a module “passed” in this manner during a previous academic year and for which they were not registered. This arrangement applies even where the student is prepared to pay the tuition fees.

  1. Change of field of study

Transfer from one field of study to another may only take place with the Dean’s approval, after consultation with the relevant Head of Department.

  1. Examinations (Refer to General Academic Regulation G12)
  1. Examinations, projects and research reports/mini-dissertations

An examination in a module may be written and/or oral. Projects and research reports/mini-dissertations are prepared and examined as stipulated in the study guide of the module, in accordance with the regulations and procedures as described below.
The examinations for modules of the first semester are usually held in May/June, while all other examinations (third- and fourth-quarter modules, second-semester modules and year modules) are usually held in October/November.

  1. Examination admission

A minimum semester, year or quarter mark of 40% is required in order to be admitted to the final examination in a specific module. In addition, all other examination admission requirements, applicable to the relevant module, must have been met.

  1. Special examinations 

Refer also to G12.4.

A medical certificate will not be accepted if it merely states that the student appeared ill or declared themselves unfit.
A medical practitioner must be consulted on or before the date on which the examination was scheduled.
Special examinations are not arranged for students who are unable to write the examinations at the times scheduled for the exam

  1. Chancellor’s examination

Refer also to G12.5.

  1. The Dean may, on the recommendation of the relevant head of department, grant a Chancellor’s examination in a module to a student who failed that module in the final year of study, and consequently does not comply with degree requirements.
  2. A student requiring no more than the equivalent of two semester modules (or one year module) to complete their qualification (diploma, certificate or degree), may be admitted to the Chancellor’s examination.
  3. To be taken into consideration for a Chancellor’s examination, a student should have written the examination and failed the module(s) and should also have complied with all other examination admission requirements which are applicable to the relevant module.
  4. Extraordinary cases may be considered by the Dean. In this case a student must apply in writing to the Dean before consideration will be given for admission to a Chancellor’s examination. The relevant head of department decides when the Chancellor’s examination will take place and may prescribe work that must be satisfactorily completed before a student may write the examination.
  5. The candidate should also comply with the subminimum requirements. The highest final mark that may be awarded is 50%.
  6. No Chancellor’s examinations will be allowed for modules with a project or design component in any discipline.

Please note:

  • In the School for the Built Environment, the pass mark required for a Chancellor’s examination is 50%, a higher mark is not allocated and the semester/year mark is not taken into consideration.
  • In the School of Information Technology, the pass mark required for a Chancellor’s examination is 50%, a higher mark is not allocated and the semester/year mark is not taken into consideration.
  • In the School of Engineering, the pass mark required for a Chancellor’s examination is 50%, the semester mark is retained during calculation of the final mark and the final mark is calculated as the weighted average of the Chancellor’s examination mark and the semester mark, in accordance with the formula as published in the study guide of the specific module. No other special Chancellor’s examinations are granted in the School of Engineering.
  1. Perusal and remarking of examination scripts

Refer also to G14. 

  1. Remarking and/or re-evaluation for modules with a project or design component

No remarking of reports submitted for examination or re-evaluation of oral presentations for examination will be allowed for modules with a project or design component in any discipline of the School of Engineering, School for the Built Environment and the School of Information Technology.

  1. Supplementary examinations in the School of Engineering

Refer also to G12.3.

In the School of Engineering a supplementary examination is only granted in instances where:

  1. A final mark of between 45% and 49% was achieved;
  2. A final mark of between 40% and 44% was achieved and where the candidate also achieved either a semester mark or an examination mark of 50% or higher;
  3. A pass mark has been obtained, but the required subminimum in the examination section of the module or divisions thereof has not been obtained.
  4. A final mark of between 40% and 49% has been obtained in first-year modules in the first semester.

Calculation of the final supplementary examination mark: 

  1. The semester mark is retained and the final mark is calculated as the weighted average of the supplementary examination mark and the semester mark, in accordance with the formula as published in the study manual of the specific module, with the proviso that the maximum final mark awarded may be no more than 50%. The only exception to this rule is in the case of first-year modules at first-semester level, where the semester mark is not considered, and where the supplementary examination mark is taken as the final mark, with the proviso that the maximum final mark awarded may be no more than 50%.
  2. All other pass requirements, as published in the study manual of each specific module, remain so and are applicable during the determination of the final result of a supplementary examination in the module. Special supplementary examinations will not be arranged for students who were not able to write the supplementary examinations during scheduled times, as given in the examinations timetable.
  1. Supplementary examinations in the School for the Built Environment

Refer also to G12.3.

Except for first-semester modules in the first year where supplementary examinations are compulsory between 40% and 49%, a supplementary examination is only granted in instances where:

  1. a final mark of between 45% and 49% was obtained;
  2. a final mark of between 40% and 44% was obtained and where the candidate also obtained either a semester mark or an examination mark of 50% or higher;
  3. a pass mark has been obtained, but the required subminimum in the examination section of the module or divisions thereof has not been obtained.

(i) to (iii) do not apply to third-year or honours modules of any of the programmes in the Department of Architecture. No supplementary examinations are granted in any year of study for design and panel-assessed modules.

  1. Supplementary examinations in the School of Information Technology

Refer also to G12.3.
In the School of Information Technology all supplementary examinations are considered and granted in accordance with the stipulations of G Regulation G12.3, and is calculated as follows:

  1. The semester mark is retained and the final mark is calculated as the weighted average of the supplementary examination mark and the semester mark, in accordance with the formula as published in the study manual of the specific module, with the proviso that the maximum final mark awarded may be no more than 50%. The only exception to this rule is in the case of first-year modules at first-semester level, where the semester mark is not considered, and where the supplementary examination mark is taken as the final mark, with the proviso that the maximum final mark awarded may be no more than 50%. For modules linked to continuous assessment, the department involved will share the supplementary exam model to be followed in the study guide of the module.
  2. All other pass requirements, as published in the study manual of each specific module, remain so and are applicable during the determination of the final result of a supplementary examination in the module
  3. No supplementary examinations are granted to third-year modules in the Department of Computer Science.

Special supplementary examinations will not be arranged for students who were not able to write the supplementary examinations during scheduled times, as provided in the examinations timetable.

  1. Pass requirements

Refer also to G11 and G12.2.

  1. In order to pass a module, a student must obtain an examination mark of at least 40% and a final mark of at least 50% except if stated otherwise in the study guide. A student passes a module with distinction if a final mark of at least 75% is obtained. The final mark is compiled from the semester/year mark and the examination mark.
  2. Please note: In the Faculty of Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology borderline cases (e.g. a mark of 49% or 74%) must be reconsidered by both the internal and external examiners, for determination of the possible merit of an upward adjustment of the mark. Marks may not be adjusted downwards, except when obvious marking and adding errors were detected. The pass mark is a minimum final mark of 50% and a student fails the module if a lower mark (e.g. 49%) was obtained.
  3. Calculation of the final mark: The semester/year mark must account for no less than 40% and no more than 60% of the final mark, with the exception of modules such as design and research projects and research reports/essays, as well as in modules where the development of general skills is the primary learning activity, where appropriate alternative norms are determined individually by schools or departments. The specific details and/or formula for the calculation of the final mark are set out in the study guide of each module. Also, a schedule listing this information (for all the modules presented in each school) will be compiled, for approval by the Dean.
  4. Calculation of the semester/year mark: The semester/year mark is compiled from formative assessment of learning activities such as assignments, presentations, practicals and group projects, as well as from class tests and semester tests. For each module the specific formula for the calculation of the semester/year mark is determined by the lecturer(s) responsible for the presentation of the module and the details are set out in the study guide. Also, a schedule listing this information for all the modules presented in each school will be compiled, for approval by the Dean. (Refer also to G11.)
  5. In some modules specific requirements in respect of certain components of the semester/year mark may be set in order for a student to pass the module (for example that satisfactory performance in and attendance of practical classes are required). Thus, even if a pass mark is obtained in the module, a pass is not granted unless these requirements are met. For such modules these specific requirements are set out in the study guide. Also, a schedule containing this information (for all such modules presented in each school) will be compiled, for approval by the Dean.
  6. A student must comply with the subminimum requirements in subdivisions of certain modules. For such modules these specific requirements are set out in the study guide of the module. Also, a schedule containing this information (for all such modules presented in each school) will be compiled, for approval by the Dean.

Please note: 
G10.3 is normally not applied by the School of Engineering, School for the Built Environment and School of Information Technology and no promotion (exemption from the examination) is allowed in any module, except in special cases where permission of the Dean is required.

  1. Summer and Winter schools

Refer also to G11.2(2.1) and G12.6(6.5).

  1. To gain entry into a Summer or Winter school that is presented, a student must have obtained exam entry for the module in the preceding year and received a final mark of at least 35% after the supplementary.
  2. If a student fails the Summer/Winter School presented, the module needs to be repeated.
  3. If a student qualifies to do more than one Summer/Winter School and there is an overlap between the Summer/Winter School, the student needs to select between the two and cannot do both.
  4. No first-year students who have failed to achieve more than 30% of the total credits, excluding non-core modules, may enrol for the Summer/Winter School. 
  1. Academic progress regulations
  1. Students who, after repeating a year of study, fail to pass all outstanding modules in the year of repetition, will be excluded and forfeit their right of admission.
  2. Students whose academic progress is not acceptable can be suspended from further studies. Refer to the following important regulations: G3 and/or regulations as they appear for the applicable programmes.
  3. A student who is excluded from further studies in terms of the stipulations of the abovementioned regulations will be notified in writing by the Dean or admissions committee at the end of the relevant semester as communicated via online student portals.
  4. A student who has been excluded from further studies may apply in writing to the Faculty Appeals Committee for readmission by the set deadline.
  5. If the excluded students are to be readmitted, the Faculty Appeals Committee will determine the conditions of readmission.
  6. Should the student not be readmitted to further studies by the Faculty Appeals Committee, they will be informed in writing as communicated via online student portals.
  7. Students who are not readmitted by the admissions committee have the right to appeal to the Senate Review Committee.
  8. Any decision taken by the Senate Review Committee is final.
  9. No first-year students who have failed to achieve more than 30% of the total credits, excluding non-core modules, may enrol for Winter/Summer School.
  1. Pass with distinction
  1. Pass with distinction in the School of Engineering

A student graduates with distinction if:

  1. no module of the third or fourth year of study of the four-year programme or of the fourth or fifth year of the ENGAGE programme was repeated and a weighted average of at least 75% (not rounded) was obtained in one year in all the modules of the final year of study; and
  2. the degree programme was completed within the prescribed four years for the four-year programme and within the prescribed five years of the ENGAGE programme.

Exceptional cases to the above will be considered by the Dean.

  1. Pass with distinction in the School for the Built Environment 

Please refer to the program specific information in the yearbook 

  1. Pass with distinction in the School of Information Technology

A degree (undergraduate) in the School of IT is conferred with distinction on a student who did not repeat any module of his/her final year, obtained a weighted average of at least 75% (not rounded) in all the prescribed modules for the final year, provided that a subminimum of 65% is obtained in each of these modules and provided that the degree is completed in the prescribed minimum period of time. Ad hoc cases will be considered by the Dean, in consultation with the relevant head of department.

  1. Dean's Merit List 
  1. Dean’s Merit List in the School of Engineering

The Dean's Merit List will be published annually on the website of the Faculty and will contain the names of the students whose academic performance over the year has been excellent and deserves recognition. Letters of commendation will be sent to students who qualify for inclusion on the Dean's Merit List.

To be eligible for inclusion in the Dean's Merit List, a student in the School for Engineering must pass all the modules as prescribed in the curriculum of a specific year of study as published. A student registered for the first, second or third year of the four-year programme must obtain a minimum weighted average of 75% (not rounded) and a student registered on the first, second, third or fourth year of the five-year programme must obtain a minimum weighted average of 75% (not rounded).

  1. Dean’s Merit List in the School for the Built Environment

The Dean's Merit List will be published annually on the website of the Faculty and will contain the names of students whose academic performance over the year has been excellent and deserves recognition. Letters of commendation will be sent to students who qualify for inclusion on the Dean's Merit List.

To be eligible for inclusion in the Dean's Merit List, a student in the School for the Built Environment must pass all the modules as prescribed in the curriculum of a specific year of study as published. A student registered for the first or second of the three-year programme must obtain a minimum weighted average of 75% (not rounded) and a student registered for the first, second or third year of the four-year programme must obtain a minimum weighted average of 75% (not rounded).

  1. Dean’s Merit List in the School of Information Technology

The Dean's Merit List will be published annually on the website of the Faculty and will contain the names of students whose academic performance over the year has been excellent and deserves recognition. Letters of commendation will be sent to students who qualify for inclusion on the Dean's Merit List.

To be eligible for inclusion in the Dean's Merit List, a student in the School of Information Technology must pass all the modules as prescribed in the curriculum of a specific year of study as published. A student registered for the first or second year of the three-year programme must obtain a minimum weighted average of 75% (not rounded).

  1. Additional regulations and information for the School of Engineering
  1. Selection

A selection procedure takes place prior to admission to any programme in the School of Engineering. Restrictions may be placed on the number of students admitted to the School and/or its departments. Postgraduate selection takes place as stipulated in the respective departmental rules.

  1. Renewal of registration

Should a student who is repeating a year of study, with the exception of first-year students, fail to obtain sufficient credits to be promoted to the subsequent year of study at the end of the year of repetition, he or she will forfeit his or her right to readmission. Students who forfeit the right to readmission, may apply in writing to the Admissions Committee for readmission to the Faculty. Provisions regarding promotion, including provisions for first-year students, appear in the regulations of the relevant fields of study.

  1. Equivalent modules

A BEng student may be permitted by the Dean, on recommendation of the relevant head of department, to register for an equivalent module in an alternate semester, although the module is normally offered to the student’s group in another semester, and providing that no timetable clashes occur.

  1. Registration of modules 
  1. Final cut-off dates are set for the change of modules (removing or adding) for each academic year. These dates are available from the Student Administration offices. 
  2. A student may not register for a module of a subsequent year if a timetable clash occurs with a module of a previous year which has not yet been passed and which is prescribed for his or her field of study, unless exemption is obtained from class attendance in the module of the previous year. 
  3. Should a student register for modules of the second semester at the beginning of a year of study, and it becomes evident at the end of the first semester, that he or she does not comply with the prerequisites of the second-semester modules, the registration of such modules will be cancelled. It is also the student's responsibility to ensure at the beginning of the second semester that the cancellation has been brought about. 
  1. Recognition of modules/study units passed at other tertiary institutions 

Refer also to G9.

  1. A bachelor’s degree for which the period of attendance is four academic years, at least during the final two academic years;
  2. Credit may be awarded for modules passed at another university in the third and fourth year, if this was preapproved by the Head of Department (based on substantially equivalent material and all outcomes achieved as prescribed by ECSA), for special arrangements and/or exchange programmes.
  1. Duration of examinations in undergraduate modules in the School of Engineering

The duration of an examination in an 8-credit module will not exceed 90 minutes and in a 16-credit module will not exceed 180 minutes, except where special approval is granted by the Dean to exceed these limits.

The duration of a supplementary examination or a special examination in all undergraduate modules will not exceed 90 minutes, except where special approval is granted by the Dean to exceed this limit. In the event of a special exam, the duration of the examination can be extended to a maximum period of 180 minutes, depending on an arrangement made between the lecturer and the student.

  1. Exposure to the practice of engineering

Engineering students are exposed in three ways to the practice of engineering during the course of their studies:

  1. Workshop practice – a module comprising a period at the end of the first year of study during which students are trained in workshop practice. Students in electrical, electronic and computer engineering attend the Introduction to Laboratory Measurements and Computer Simulations’ module.
  2. Practical training – specific periods of work at firms during which experience is gained in the practice of engineering. Students may deviate from this stipulation only with the permission of the Dean.
  3. Excursions – study excursions arranged for students to visit various engineering firms and installations in order to obtain insight into the industry. This training is compulsory. Details of the modules regarding these aspects of training are explained in the sections of this publication which deal with the curricula and syllabi of the various programmes.
  1. Promotion to the second semester of the first year    

First year students who did not pass enough credits that will enable them to complete the year with at least 70% of the total number of credits at the end year, is dismissed from studies in the School of Engineering. A student who is registered for the Engineering Engage degree programme and has passed only 24 credits in the first semester, will also be dismissed.

  1. Additional regulations and information for the School of Information Technology
  1. Academic literacy

All first-year students in the School of Information Technology enrol for ALL 121, a specialised module in academic literacy for Information Technology. 

  1. Requirements for specific modules

A candidate who has:

  1. not passed at least four Computer science modules at second-year level, will not be permitted to register for the Computer science modules at third-year level, unless special permission has been granted by the relevant head of department.
  2. selected a module presented by another faculty or department must take note of the admission requirements of such a module, subminimum required in examination papers and supplementary examinations.
  1. Minimum study period (G7) 

The minimum period of study for the degree is indicated at the relevant degree programme. 

  1. Promotion to the second semester of the first year    

A new first-year student who did not pass enough credit that will enable them to complete the year with at least 70% of the total number of credits at the end of of the year, is dismissed from studies in the School of Information Technology.

  1. Additional regulations and information for the School for the Built Environment
  1. Selection

A selection procedure takes place prior to admission to any programme in the Department of Architecture as limited places are available. The BSc Architecture programme follows a four-step selection process and will only be considered as an applicant’s first choice of study. Consult departmental guidelines on the undergraduate and postgraduate selection processes.

  1. Promotion to the second semester of the first year    

A new first-year student who did not pass enough credits that will enable them to complete the year with at least 70% of the total number of credits at the end of the year, is dismissed from studies in the School for the Built Environment.

  1. EBIT misconduct policy

PREAMBLE
This regulation must be read in conjunction with the Disciplinary code for students as provided in the General Regulations and Rules of the University of Pretoria. The regulation pertains to the handling of specific cases of misconduct within departments in the Faculty of EBIT and serves a threefold purpose:

  1. Facilitating internal resolution: The regulation aims to authorise the faculty to address particular forms of misconduct internally within their respective departments, thus granting them the discretion to handle such matters without an immediate referral to the Division of Legal Services.
  2. Expediency and resource efficiency: By enabling the swift resolution of misconduct cases, the regulation seeks to curtail the financial and human resources otherwise entailed in protracted legal proceedings. It endeavours to streamline the handling of misconduct incidents with expediency without compromising the integrity of the process.
  3. Controlled escalation of matters: The regulation establishes a suitable channel to address specific types of misconduct cases, ensuring that they do not unnecessarily escalate to the Division of Legal Services. This approach facilitates a balanced approach in dealing with misconduct cases, reserving the involvement of legal services for more complex or severe scenarios.

In essence, this regulation serves as a framework to effectively address instances of misconduct within the scope of application, fostering a fair and efficient resolution process while judiciously managing available resources.

SCOPE OF THE REGULATION
This regulation governs the conduct of all students enrolled in degree programs within the Faculty of EBIT or participating in modules presented by the Faculty of EBIT. Additionally, it extends its application to students from other faculties who are enrolled in modules offered by the Faculty of EBIT, strictly within the scope of such modules. However, it does not extend to modules presented to EBIT students by other faculties. The scope of this regulation encompasses the following provisions:

  1. First-time offenders: This regulation shall be applicable to students who commit misconduct for the first time. However, any subsequent instances of misconduct shall be referred to the Division of Legal Services for further action.
  2. Admission of guilt: Students who admit to their guilt in cases of misconduct may be considered for internal disciplinary proceedings. Conversely, if a student pleads not guilty, the matter must be referred to the Division of Legal Services for formal legal handling.
  3. Display of remorse: The regulation takes into consideration instances where a student demonstrates genuine remorse for their misconduct.
  4. Agreement to internal disciplinary process: If a student agrees to submit to the internal disciplinary process upon initiating the case, they waive their right to request a referral of the case to the Division of Legal Services.
  5. Staff approval for internal management: If members of staff involved in the case concur that it is appropriate for internal resolution, the case will be retained for internal management. Subsequently, the Departmental Disciplinary Committee relinquishes the option to refer the case to the Division of Legal Services once they determine that it fulfils the prerequisites for internal resolution.

DEFINITIONS OF MISCONDUCT
This regulation addresses two distinct categories of misconduct:

  1. Academic Misconduct: This pertains to acts of dishonesty in coursework or assignments. To qualify for internal resolution, the alleged offence must not have been committed during a semester test, similarly significant assessment, or an examination.
    1. Examples of academic misconduct eligible for internal resolution include but are not limited to unauthorised collaboration on a homework assignment with a classmate, minor cheating during an in-class quiz by discreetly looking at a neighbour's answers,
    2. or submitting a slightly modified version of a previously submitted assignment for a different module or for the same module (e.g. in cases where students are repeating a module) without explicit permission to do so.
    3. Examples of academic misconduct not eligible for internal resolution include but are not limited to falsifying data or results in a project or practical experiment, purchasing an assignment and presenting it as one's original work, gaining access to unauthorised materials before an exam to gain an unfair advantage, impersonating another student to take an exam or submit an assignment on their behalf, hiring another student to take an exam or submit an assignment on their behalf, submitting someone else's work as the student's own, with or without their knowledge, and engaging in systematic cheating during an exam or assignment by colluding with multiple students.
  2. Non-Academic Misconduct: This encompasses acts other than academic misconduct, such as minor disruptions in a class or academic setting or minor violations of departmental or Faculty rules.
    1. Examples of non-academic misconduct that may be resolved internally include situations where a student persistently interrupts a lecturer, thereby hindering effective teaching, or when a student consistently demonstrates rudeness toward peers, tutors, or assistant lecturers. Although not considered severe enough to warrant penalties such as expulsion from the University, such misconduct can still undermine the academic environment and disrupt the learning process.
    2. Examples of offences that must be referred to the Division of Legal Services include, but are not limited to: students intentionally disrupting a lecture with the aim of terminating it prematurely or cases involving racism, sexism, and harassment.
  3. Any form of transgression, whether academic or non-academic misconduct, which constitutes a crime in South African law, for example, fraud or assault, will be referred to Division Legal Services.

It is important to recognise that this regulation operates within the framework of applicable institutional guidelines and policies. Determining the severity and eligibility for internal resolution of any misconduct shall be made at the lecturer's discretion in conjunction with a duly appointed Departmental Disciplinary Representative, ensuring fair and just resolutions in accordance with established procedures and principles.

DEPARTMENTAL DISCIPLINARY REPRESENTATIVE AND COMMITTEE
A Departmental Disciplinary Committee (DDC) shall be composed of a Departmental Disciplinary Representative, which will be the Head of the Department, and/or the Undergraduate Coordinator, and/or a nominated representative, in addition to the lecturer who reported the alleged misconduct. To ensure uniformity and adherence to legal principles in their proceedings, all Departmental Disciplinary Representatives shall receive annual training provided by the Division of Legal Services.

This structure ensures that the DDC comprises qualified individuals with the necessary expertise to resolve internal misconduct cases in a fair and impartial manner. The inclusion of the Head of the Department, Undergraduate Coordinator, or their nominated representatives helps to uphold the integrity of the disciplinary process, as these individuals hold relevant administrative positions within the academic unit.

Furthermore, the requirement for annual training from the Division of Legal Services enhances the competence and consistency of the DDCs across the Faculty. Such training equips representatives with updated knowledge of legal standards and procedural aspects, enabling them to handle misconduct cases with due diligence and in accordance with applicable policies and regulations.

PROCEDURE AND PENALTY
The following process outlines the internal handling of misconduct cases within the departments, ensuring compliance with university protocols and safeguarding the rights of the students involved. 

  1. Notice of allegations and interview.
    1. The student shall be formally notified of the allegations against them via email. The student must indicate their preference for either internal resolution or direct referral to the Division of Legal Services within seven days from the date of written notification. The formal notification will specify the penalty should the student be found guilty of misconduct.
    2. If the student chooses to continue with the internal process, an interview will be scheduled and conducted by the DDC. This interview shall be conducted without prejudice to the student's rights, allowing them to respond to the allegations and present their version of the events.
  2. Representation: In instances where the student seeks legal representation, an internal resolution shall not be applicable, and the case shall be referred to the Division of Legal Services.
  3. Penalties. Depending on the gravity of the case, the following penalties may be imposed in ascending order of severity.
    1. Written warning. A written warning detailing the misconduct and the requirement to comply with acceptable conduct must be compiled by the DDC and signed by the Head of the Department.
    2. Cancellation of a section of an assessment's mark with the option for resubmission. In such cases, the section mark must be capped at either the examination entry subminimum, if applicable, or at the examination entry subminimum, typically 40%, where the assessment does not carry an examination entry subminimum.
    3. Cancellation of the mark of a section of an assessment without the option for resubmission. This may result in examination refusal should the assessment carry an examination entry subminimum.
    4. Cancellation of an assessment's mark with the option for resubmission. In such cases, the assessment mark must be capped at either the examination entry subminimum, if applicable, or at the examination entry subminimum, typically 40%, where the assessment does not carry an examination entry subminimum.
    5. Cancellation of the assessment mark without the option for reassessment. This may result in examination refusal should the assessment carry an examination entry subminimum.
  4. Maximum penalty for non-academic misconduct. The most severe penalty that may be imposed for misconduct other than academic misconduct is the issuance of an official letter of warning by the Head of the Department.
  5. Incident reporting. All incidents and their respective outcomes must be reported to the Division of Legal Services using the prescribed form provided in Annexure A.
  6. Record keeping. The Division of Legal Services shall maintain records of all reported incidents.
  7. Reported instances may be advanced in aggravation of sanction in any subsequent proceedings, whether internally, by the faculty or by the Division of Legal Services.
  8. Implications for the student's letter of conduct. Should the student not be found guilty of any further infraction(s) during the balance of their studies, the record will not be included in the student’s statement of conduct.

General Academic Regulations and Student Rules
The General Academic Regulations (G Regulations) and General Student Rules apply to all faculties and registered students of the University, as well as all prospective students who have accepted an offer of a place at the University of Pretoria. On registering for a programme, the student bears the responsibility of ensuring that they familiarise themselves with the General Academic Regulations applicable to their registration, as well as the relevant faculty-specific and programme-specific regulations and information as stipulated in the relevant yearbook. Ignorance concerning these regulations will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression, or basis for an exception to any of the aforementioned regulations. The G Regulations are updated annually and may be amended after the publication of this information.

Regulations, degree requirements and information
The faculty regulations, information on and requirements for the degrees published here are subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information.

University of Pretoria Programme Qualification Mix (PQM) verification project
The higher education sector has undergone an extensive alignment to the Higher Education Qualification Sub-Framework (HEQSF) across all institutions in South Africa. In order to comply with the HEQSF, all institutions are legally required to participate in a national initiative led by regulatory bodies such as the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET), the Council on Higher Education (CHE), and the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA). The University of Pretoria is presently engaged in an ongoing effort to align its qualifications and programmes with the HEQSF criteria. Current and prospective students should take note that changes to UP qualification and programme names, may occur as a result of the HEQSF initiative. Students are advised to contact their faculties if they have any questions.

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