News: wildlife

  • Gallery

    Domesticated cattle are fast food for lions

    Lions show specific preferences for particular cattle types. They exploit cattle when available and repeatedly kill cattle in areas where they are left unguarded or unprotected, also targeting animals that are easiest to catch. Lion populations across Africa have dropped precipitously over the past century, putting them at risk of local extinction in some areas, especially when they move out of...

  • Story

    UP study finds that lions hunt particular cattle types

    When wild lions sneak up on a herd of cattle to grab an easy meal, the dice seem to be loaded more heavily against certain herd members, which are more likely than the others to be killed and eaten, according to a new study conducted by scientists from the University of Pretoria (UP).

  • Gallery

    Novel immobilising drug combinations

    A team from UP’s Faculty of Veterinary Science, in collaboration with the Brain Function Research Group at Wits University and the SANParks Veterinary Wildlife Services team, conducted research in the Kruger National Park to find new combinations of drugs for immobilizing animals.

  • Story

    UP scientist co-authors study on biodiversity loss index

    A study co-authored by Dr Bernard Coetzee, a senior lecturer in the Department of Zoology and Entomology at the University of Pretoria (UP), has detailed how chance events could alter the Living Planet Index (LPI), a measure of the world’s biological diversity based on population trends.

  • Story

    New study welfare and survival of Africa's arid mammals under threat of climate change

    Dr Ned Snelling, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Anatomy and Physiology and Prof Leith Meyer, Director of the Centre for Veterinary Wildlife Studies, both from the Faculty of Veterinary Science have just published a new study on the welfare and survival of Africa’s arid-dwelling mammals under the threat of climate change.

  • Story

    Ground-breaking study reveals colonies of mole-rats communicate with each other in their own dialect

    A study by a team of scientists at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) in Berlin, Germany and the University of Pretoria (UP) has found that naked mole-rats can communicate with one another within their own colony. They do this with a unique dialect that is specific to that individual colony.

  • Gallery

    Ground-breaking study reveals colonies of mole-rats communicate with each other in their own dialect

    A study by a team of scientists at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) in Berlin, Germany and the University of Pretoria (UP) has found that naked mole-rats can communicate with one another within their own colony.

  • Story

    UP researchers embark on vaccine trial for bovine TB

    Professor Anita Michel and Dr Jennie Hewlett, University of Pretoria (UP) researchers in the Faculty of Veterinary Science, have announced the start of vaccine trials for tuberculosis (TB) in African buffalo.

  • Story

    New study finds SA's springhare is a better hopper than Australian Kangaroos

    While kangaroos are distinguished for their well-developed hindlimbs which they use to hop across the Australian outback, it seems South Africa has its own unusual hopper – the springhare.

Copyright © University of Pretoria 2020. All rights reserved.

Share