News: insects

  • Story

    Bees find it easier to drink warmer nectar

    Warmer weather makes feeding time much easier, and more effective, for honeybees, according to Professor Sue Nicolson of the University of Pretoria (UP) and colleagues from Chinese universities, who made this discovery after analysing high-speed videos. The results were published in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

  • Stories

    The dark side of the hive

    Most people have a perception that beehives and colonies are perfectly built, and that they are places of industrious labour for the greater good of the colony and a workforce working for the common good. Prof Crewe’s research uncovers the “dark” side of bees.

  • Video

    A brief history of bees

    Once upon a time there was a world without bees, but we would not have liked this world. It was a dark world without flowering plants competing to attract buzzing bees for pollination—a world without colourful fruits and berries. Even after solitary bees emerged, it took many millennia before bees became social and a colourful and sweet world, a place with nectar, emerged.

  • Infographic

    The dark side of the hive

    Most people have a perception that beehives and colonies are perfectly built, and that they are places of industrious labour for the greater good of the colony and a workforce working for the common good. Prof Crewe’s research uncovers the “dark” side of bees.

  • Video

    UP researcher's team discovers new compounds with the potential to eliminate malaria

    The University of Pretoria (UP) has discovered new potent chemical compounds that show potential as candidates for both the treatment and elimination of malaria. Professor Lyn-Marie Birkholtz was part of an international team that published this discovery in the journal Nature Communications

  • Story

    UP researcher's team discovers new compounds with the potential to eliminate malaria

    The University of Pretoria (UP) has discovered new potent chemical compounds that show potential as candidates for both the treatment and elimination of malaria.

  • Talking Point

    Invasive mosquito species could bring more malaria to Africa’s urban areas

    A species of mosquito that can carry malaria – known as Anopheles stephensi – has invaded eastern Africa and is quickly moving across the region. Moina Spooner, from The Conversation Africa, asked Jeremy Herren and Clifford Mutero to provide insights into why this invasion is happening and what can be done to protect people from it.

  • Video

    What can we do to curb the spread of the polyphagous shothole borer and save SA's urban forests?

    The polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) is a tiny, invasive black beetle from Asia that has recently been discovered in South Africa. Although only 2 mm in length, this tiny beetle has detrimental consequences for South African trees, as it carries a destructive fungus, Fusarium euwallaceae, from tree to tree.

  • Stories

    The secret behind South Africa's disappearing urban forests

    Dr Trudy Paap is a participant in the International Plant Sentinel Network who was tasked to do routine surveys for tree pests and diseases in the National Botanical Gardens of South Africa, a project funded by the South African National Biodiversity Institute.

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