Open Research Topics

Masters and PhD topics currently available


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Prof M. Sharifpur

  • Application of nanofluids in thermal systems

Prof. JFM Slabber

  • A methodology needs to be developed to conduct safety analysis of optimized core design with mixed cores.
  • To investigate the risk of super criticality and boiling in the Spent Fuel Pool. Special attention must be given to the deterministic and probabilistic analysis to ascertain that risks are well known and the mitigation strategies are in place. This must consider several parameters such as burn-up, checker-boarding and fuel integrity.

Prof J. Dirker

  • Non-uniform heat flux flow boiling
  • Phase Change Materials (PCMs) energy storage

Prof W. le Roux

  • Experimental testing of a solar thermal Brayton cycle

Dr L Smith and Prof K Craig

  • Fuselage aftbody analysis and optimisation for efficient propulsion integration

Dr M Mehrabi

  • Modeling and multi-objective optimization of heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of nanofluids in microtubes
  • Modeling of thermophysical properties of magnetic nanofluids for biomedical applications.

Dr M. Everts

  • Heat transfer in the transitional flow regime

Dr BD Bock

  • Falling film refrigerant evaporator:
    • Experimental heat transfer characterization of boiling on the outside of enhanced tubes 
  • Solar heated thermosiphon boiler for domestic water heating using interfacial evaporation
    • Design, modelling, optimization and technoeconomic analysis
  • 3D printed heat exchangers:
    • Design, modelling, optimization and technoeconomic analysis
  • Evaporative algae dewatering:
    • Design, modelling, optimization and technoeconomic analysis 
  • A novel falling film algae photobioreactor
    • Experimental characterization of mass and heat transfer coefficients

Study leader: Dr BD Bock

Falling film refrigerant evaporator: Experimental heat transfer characterization of boiling on the outside of enhanced tubes 

Falling film evaporators, such as the one illustrated here by York, are used in some central air conditioning systems to cool water that is then sent throughout the building to wherever cooling is required (i.e. hydronics systems). The water inside the evaporator tubes is cooled by boiling and evaporating the refrigerant that is trickled onto the outside of the tubes. Flooded evaporators are often used in these systems as well, but the falling film evaporators have the advantage of requiring less refrigerant charge and at times improved heat transfer.
Falling film evaporators may be particularly useful in the near future as the shift to less climate damaging refrigerants occurs. These new refrigerants are often slightly poisonous or flammable, and thus the lower refrigerant charge of falling film evaporators means that they pose less of a safety risk. However, the heat transfer characteristics of these falling film evaporators are still not very well understood, particularly with these new generation of refrigerants.
The aim of this study will be to experimentally test and investigate the heat transfer of new tubes and refrigerants in a falling film evaporator. The Falling Film Evaporator Facility will be used, and the study will build on the previous work conducted by students and previous collaborations with MIT and Imperial College. The exact project scope will be determined by the most recent findings in the department.
Some previous studies of this sort conducted within our department with this facility can be found here:  [1] [2] [3].

Study Type: This is an experimental study focused on lab work, with experimental measurement with sensors and high-speed camera. The theory covered will focus on the physics of fluid dynamics, two-phase heat transfer, bubble physics and similar. Some basic coding will be required to process and analyse the results. Some image analysis of the high-speed footage may be required.

Study Mode: Full Time

Degree Type: Masters or PhD

Experimental funding: Provided

Student funding: The student will have to self fund their studies or secure funding through DSI-NRF Masters/PhD program or similar.

Solar heated thermosiphon boiler for domestic water heating using interfacial evaporation: Design, modelling, optimization and technoeconomic analysis

Interfacial evaporation is a relatively new technology that allows for only the surface of a liquid pool to be heated and subsequently evaporated (please note: not boiled). This is achieved with typically a floating nanoporous substance in a pool of liquid. The nanoporous substance is heated by the sun’s rays and this results in evaporation of the liquid within the nanopores. As the liquid evaporates, this generates a negative pressure that sucks up the liquid from the pool below into the nanopores through capillary action, replenishing the liquid.

This means that in order to evaporate the liquid, only the liquid in the nanoporous substance needs to be heated, instead of the bulk liquid in the pool. This results in a very efficient heating process, as the bulk liquid is not heated and thus does not lose heat to the atmosphere, and instead almost all the solar heating is used to directly evaporate the liquid.

This process could be used in a domestic solar water heater to drive a thermosiphon boiler type system. This two-phase thermosiphon boiler, often called a Two-Phase Closed Thermosiphon (TPCT) to distinguish it from the single-phase thermosyphons used in flat plate solar collectors, would use the sun’s heat to evaporate a fluid in a collector using interfacial evaporation, after which the heated vapour would rise to a condenser. There the vapour would condense, releasing the heat to the water in a domestic geyser, after which the condensed liquid would fall back down to the collector and the cycle would repeat itself.

While thermosiphons have been investigated before for use in domestic solar water heating, this combination with interfacial evaporation has not been investigated.

In this project a thermosiphon system using interfacial evaporation will be designed and modelled to predict the technical performance that the system would be able to achieve. The hypothetical system would require a collector, and both tracking and stationery collectors would be modelled. The model will make use of heat transfer relations and thermodynamics to predict the overall technical performance of the system. The model will then be used to consider several heating fluids and design choices to optimise the design.

Lastly, the system design and technical performance parameters will then be used as inputs into a techno economic analysis of the design to see how this system would compare to current domestic heating solutions on the market and thus decide if this is a commercially viable technology.

Study Type: This is a desktop study focused on modelling and analysis of the various design configurations developed during the study. The theory covered will focus on the physics of interfacial evaporation, condensation, heat loss, solar ray concentration and similar as well as advanced techno-economic analyses methods. Coding and numerical analysis will be required to develop the model of the system, but it is envisaged to be largely a first principles model. However, some CFD may be necessary.  

Study Mode: Full Time or Part Time

Degree Type: Masters

Experimental funding: Open-source software will be used.

Student funding: The student will have to self fund their studies or secure funding through DSI-NRF Masters/PhD program or similar.

Collaborators: Graduate School of Technology Management, University of Pretoria

3D printed heat exchangers: Design, modelling, optimization and technoeconomic analysis

3D printing (or additive manufacturing) can be used to print shapes that previous manufacturing technologies could not achieve. This allows for new design ideas and concepts to be produced to compete with existing design paradigms.

Heat exchangers can benefit from these complex shapes, as they allow for enhanced heat transfer through advanced shapes not previously possible with existing manufacturing technologies. With copper 3D printing in particular only recently successfully achieved, the commercial competitiveness of these 3D printed heat exchangers is not well known.

In this project, a 3D printed heat exchanger and ‘traditional’ flat plate heat exchanger will be compared. They will be designed, developed, modelled and optimized to determine the performance advantages that the 3D printed heat exchanger can possibly provide. Lastly, a techno economic analysis will be completed to determine the cost benefits ( if any) of these 3D printed heat exchangers.

Study Type: This is a desktop study focused on modelling and analysis of the various design configurations developed during the study. The theory covered will focus on the physics of heat transfer of single phase and phase change systems. (i.e. boiling and condensation). Coding and numerical analysis will be required to develop the model of the system, but it is envisaged to be largely a first principles model. However, some CFD may be necessary.  

Study Mode: Full Time or Part Time

Degree Type: Masters

Experimental funding: Open-source software will be used.

Student funding: The student will have to self fund their studies or secure funding through DSI-NRF Masters/PhD program or similar.

Collaborators: Graduate School of Technology Management, University of Pretoria

Evaporative algae dewatering: Design, modelling, optimization and technoeconomic analysis 

Algae are an exciting possible crop to grow for a variety of reasons, such as biofuels, protein for animal feed or niche biochemical compounds. However, algae production is largely still too expensive for many of these products to be cost competitive.

The dewatering stage of the algae production is one of the reasons for this, as it is a costly process due to the large amount of water that needs to be removed from the algae. A number of solar based methods have been attempted to remove the water. However, the heat of the sun’s rays can damage the algae cells, making it a problematic approach to attempt.

Enhanced evaporative methods pose an interesting possible class of solution, as these could provide greater evaporation in a lower footprint at a lower cost.  A number of evaporative systems will be considered in this study, such as falling films of liquid applied to vertical sheets in the open air, or interfacial evaporation, as recently noted here. These evaporative methods would not overheat the algae, thus preventing damage, while still removing large amounts of the water from the algae.

A number of evaporative systems will be designed, modelled, optimised and analysed to determine their technical performance, followed by a techno economic analysis to determine if any are commercially suitability.

Study Type: This is a desktop study focused on modelling and analysis of the various design configurations developed during the study. The theory covered will focus on the physics of heat and mass transfer of evaporating water. Coding and numerical analysis will be required to develop the model of the system, but it is envisaged to be largely a first principles model. However, some CFD may be necessary.  

Study Mode: Full Time or Part Time

Degree Type: Masters

Experimental funding: Open-source software will be used.

Student funding: The student will have to self fund their studies or secure funding through DSI-NRF Masters/PhD program or similar.

Collaborators: Graduate School of Technology Management, University of Pretoria

A novel falling film algae photobioreactor: Experimental characterization of mass and heat transfer coefficients

Algae are an exciting possible crop to grow for a variety of reasons, such as biofuels, protein for animal feed or niche biochemical compounds. However, algae production is largely still too expensive for many of these products to be cost competitive.

The Department of Mechanical Engineering is currently developing a novel falling film photobioreactor that hopes to reduce the costs of algae production. This reactor’s heat and mass transfer characteristics need to be quantified to determine its technical capabilities so that it can be compared to current reactors on the market and its competitiveness can thus be quantified.

The student will thus conduct an experimental campaign to measure the mass and heat transfer characteristics across a range of atmospheric conditions as well as a number of design parameters of the falling film photobioreactor.

Study Mode: Full Time 

Degree Type: Masters

Experimental funding: Provided

Student funding: The student will have to self fund their studies or secure funding through DSI-NRF Masters/PhD program DSI-CSIR program or similar.

Study leader: Dr M Mehrabi

Modeling and multi-objective optimization of heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of nanofluids in microtubes.

In this project, heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of different nanofluids [it may include hybrid nanofluids] in microtubes will be modelled numerically by using ANSYS commercial software [student version is available at UP for free usage] as well as Lattice Boltzmann technique. The modelling will cover the influence of Brownian motion, thermophoresis force; lift forces, Van der Waal forces and Double layer forces. After successful compilation of the numerical simulation, the numerical result will be branch marked with experimental result. The last part of the project is using an in-house multi-objective optimization code, to find the best nanoparticle combination to reach the highest heat transfer and lowest pressure drop.

Modeling of thermophysical properties of magnetic nanofluids for biomedical applications.

Magnetic materials have been used with grain sizes down to the nanoscale for longer than any other type of material. This is because of a fundamental change in the magnetic structure of ferro- and ferrimagnetic materials when grain sizes are reduced. With the increasing sophistication of pharmaceuticals, the dramatic development of cell manipulation and even DNA sequencing, the possibility of using magnetic nanoparticles to improve the effectiveness of such technologies is obviously appealing. Hence there are proposals for drug delivery systems, particularly for anti-inflammatory agents and also for the use of magnetic separation technologies for rapid DNA sequencing. A further and somewhat surprising application of magnetic nanoparticles lies in the production of controlled heating effects. Each cycle of a hysteresis loop of any magnetic material involves an energy loss proportional to the area of the loop. Hence if magnetic nanoparticles having the required coercivity are remotely positioned at a given site in the body, perhaps the site of a malignancy, then the application of an alternating magnetic field can be used to selectively warm a given area. It has been proposed that this simple physical effect could be used both to destroy cells directly and to induce a modest increase in temperature so as to increase the efficacy of either chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

Study leaders: Dr L Smith and Prof K Craig

Fuselage aftbody analysis and optimisation for efficient propulsion integration

Efficiently integrated airframe propulsion systems offer the potential to maximise aircraft performance and reduce noise emissions. This contributes to one of the ambitious targets for environmental impact of aviation to explore new technologies to reduce emissions, fuel consumption and noise pollution. Installing the propulsion units on the back of the fuselage the propellers can ingest the fuselage boundary layer and thereby reducing the effective drag of the fuselage, all while improving the propulsive efficiency of the power plant. Such a close integration of the propellers into the airframe lowers nacelle drag and reduces external noise radiation. Analysis and optimisation of this integration and the interaction of these systems will be the core focus of this work.

Study leader: M Everts

Heat transfer in the transitional flow regime

The Clean Energy Research Group over the past ten years did extensive work on heat transfer in the transitional flow regime (the flow regime between laminar and turbulent flow). The work was experimental in nature and four state-of-the-art experimental set-ups were developed. On all four of these set-ups experiments were conducted that improved our fundamental understanding of heat transfer and pressure drop in the transitional flow regime. The work has drawn a lot of international attention. Two students will complete their studies at the end of this year or beginning of 2018. The experimental set-ups of these two students will be available for new follow-up projects. The exact details of the project will be determined by the outcomes of the existing projects.  It will probably be necessary to implement some minor changes on the set-ups, however, it will be possible to start producing results relatively quickly. Examples of recent work are available on: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B_HYfQIIW4eLcnhmOWEwZ2l1V1U

Study leader: Prof M Sharifpur

Application of nanofluids in thermal systems

The fluids which usually use as heat transfer working fluids have limited capacity to remove the heat in the various thermal systems in different industries such as power generation (especially nuclear power plants), automotive, petrochemical processes, solar-thermal systems, fuel/chemical production, air-conditioning, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), and microelectronics. The progression of the technology has resulted in an explosive growth of thermal management problems in compact space. Nanofluids which are solid-liquid composites show higher thermal conductivity and higher convective heat transfer performance than traditional liquids in certain conditions. Therefore, by using nanofluids, the heat transfer process can be optimized. The nanoparticle materials could be ceramics, oxides, metals, bio-materials and nanotubes. The size of the nanoparticles is usually between 1nm and 100nm. The most important parameters in thermal-fluid analyses of the nanofluids are; effective thermal conductivity, effective viscosity and the conditions and situations which improve the convective heat transfer by using nanofluids. On the other hand, magnetic nanofluids show more efficient in the presence of a proper magnetic field. Therefore, different projects are defined in the nanofluids area in this research group, they include (but not limited to):

  • Stability of nanofluids
  • Natural convection of nanofluids
  • Forced convection of nanofluids
  • Nanofluids in the transient regime
  • Application of nanofluids for solar-thermal systems
  • Application of nanofluids for nuclear power plants
  • Application of bio-nanofluids
  • Two-phase flow approach of nanofluids in nano-scale heat transfer

All the projects mentioned above may involve experimental investigation, mathematical modelling and CFD simulations. For each candidate, concerning his/her background and the priorities of available research grants, a specific project will be defined.

Study leader: Prof J Dirker  

Non-uniform heat flux flow boiling

Flow boiling is an important heat transfer mechanism.  In thermal solar energy systems, such as direct steam generation plants or solar driven desalination plants, the working fluid is heated in collector tubes exposed to focused solar irradiation. Several types of collector tube and solar reflections systems exist, but they all result in circumferentially non-uniform heat flux conditions on the outer surface of the collector tube.  Because most flow boiling literature is for fully uniform heat flux conditions, relatively little is known about what impact the heat flux distribution has on the internal heat transfer performance (heat transfer coefficient).   In this investigation the influence of the heat flux distribution is to be investigated experimentally. For this purpose one or more horizontal test sections are to be constructed with specially designed heating elements with which different solar heat flux distribution conditions can be mimicked in a laboratory environment.  Test are to be conducted at different mass flow rates, heat flux distributions and heat flux levels.   Wall temperature heat flux measurements are to be made and processed into heat transfer coefficients.  Relevant correlations are to be developed to describe the impact of the investigated parameters.

Phase Change Materials (PCMs) energy storage

The use of PCMs is a viable method of storing thermal energy collected from solar sources to be utilized at night.   Liquid-solid PCM’s support high energy concentrations and do not suffer as much from a high volumetric contraction and expansion as is the case with vapour-liquid PCM’s.    The phase change temperature is important and should match the requirements of the application.  For solar power thermal storage this limits the list of suitable materials.  These include for instance inorganic salts and metal alloys.     Inorganic molten salts are already used in some solar power plant types as the heat transfer fluid (only in its liquid phase), but has not yet been fully considered as a phase change material in, for instance, possibly simpler type direct steam generation plants, where water is used as the heat transfer fluid directly.  A draw-back of inorganic salts are that they have relatively low thermal conductivities which result in  a significant thermal barrier during the charging (solidifying) and discharging (melting)  modes of thermal storage modules.

In this numerical optimization topic, a commercial numerical software package is to be used to model a thermal storage module where heat transfer rates between (to and from) the heat transfer fluid and (a) selected phase change material(s) is to be maximized during the charging as well as discharging modes.   The model is to be validated against experimental data obtained from literature before optimization can commence.  Optimization design variables include the thickness of the phase change material plate layers, the length of the plate layers and the number of phase change plate layers.

Study leader: Prof WG le Roux                                                           

Experimental testing of a solar thermal Brayton cycle

South Africa has one of the best solar resources in the world. The small-scale solar thermal Brayton cycle consists of a solar dish which concentrates solar power onto a solar receiver in which air is heated before being expanded in a turbine for electrical power generation. A recuperator is also used which allows for higher system efficiency and also a lower compressor pressure ratio. The turbo-machine of the small-scale solar thermal Brayton cycle can consist of a turbine and a radial compressor mounted onto the same shaft. Turbo-machines like these, using air as working fluid, are available off-the-shelf from the motor industry at competitive prices. A 4.8 m diameter solar dish and tubular cavity receiver has been investigated experimentally in recent work, but experimental testing of a prototype solar thermal Brayton cycle is the main objective of this research and therefore, more than one research topic can be accommodated. To approach a prototype, further research can be done analytically and numerically using tools such as Flownex as well as further testing and improvement of the efficiency of the high-temperature solar receiver, while also improving the efficiency of the proposed cycle. Furthermore, experimental testing of a high-temperature recuperator can be performed as well as the selection and testing of micro-turbines.

Study leader:  Prof JFM Slabber

A methodology needs to be developed to conduct safety analysis of optimized core design with mixed cores.

The field of study combines the 3-dimensional reactor physics analysis of a large number of random groupings of fuel elements with a wide variety of operational histories, that are placed in the fixed geometry of the spent fuel pool at the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station [4]. The study will identify the probability of an accidental super-critical geometry being created and the resultant heat production and removal by natural convection heat transfer mechanisms in the surrounding water of the spent fuel pool.

In general the project requires existing knowledge of reactor physics coupled to heat transfer phenomena [2]. The novelty of the project is to determine the extent of the random groupings of the packings coupled to the burn-up history of the fuel elements and to determine the risk, in terms of overheating and fission product release that such an accidental criticality event will pose.  

The proposed cooperative research project will investigate the risk of super criticality and boiling in the SFP. This proposed framework will utilize risk informed approaches to identify parameters necessary to ensure that risks of super criticality and boiling in the SFP are minimized. According to the definition risk is a probability multiplied by consequences. The proposed assessment will utilize probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods combined with deterministic studies in the areas of thermal hydraulics, and reactivity (criticality) to evaluate consequences [1]. This framework will form a technical foundation to be used to devise mitigation strategies and provide input to developing regulatory changes by NNR.

The tools to be used in this project consist of MCNP6 [4], SCALE-6.2 [5], COBRA-SFS [2] and MCNP6/CTF [3-6]. MCNP will be utilized to carry out analysis of criticality safety while SCALE-6.2 will be used to confirm independently the MCNP criticality calculations, perform depletion calculations when needed, and conduct uncertainty analysis and propagation. COBRA-SFS, a thermal-hydraulic code developed for steady-state and transient analysis of multi-assembly spent-fuel storage will be used to model important physical behavior governing the thermal performance of SFPs, with internal and external natural convection flow patterns, and heat transfer by convection, conduction, and thermal radiation. Of particular significance is the capability for detailed thermal radiation modeling within the fuel rod array. The multi-physics code MCNP6/CTF, developed at NCSU, will help investigate criticality (reactivity) and boiling in SFPS taking into account complete modeling of all feedback effects involved. The proposed project will develop models for the Koeberg nuclear power plant spent fuel pool for the computation tools involved in the project: MCNP6, SCALE-6.2, COBRA-SFS and MCNP6/CTF.

The proposed work will require use of high performance computing facilities. The Virtual Computing Laboratory at NCSU (https://vcl.ncsu.edu/) will be utilized.  The Office of Information Technology (OIT) High Performance Computing (HPC) services provide NCSU students, faculty high performance computing resources, and consulting support for research and instruction. Campus Linux Cluster, henry2 has 1192 dual socket servers with Intel Xeon Processors (mix of single-, dual-, quad-, six-, and eight-core), 2-4GB per core distributed memory, dual gigabit or 10Gb Ethernet interconnects. Also integrated into henry2 are a number of nodes with 16 cores and up to 128GB of memory. These nodes are intended to support shared memory (OpenMP) jobs or other jobs with large memory requirements. The HPC services are available allowing for running jobs up to 128 processor cores up to 48 hours. The number of nodes can also be expanded on demand to accommodate higher computational requirements. In addition, the Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Modeling Group (RDFMG) at NCSU, led by Dr. Avramova, has the fowling computational resources

  1. The Linux cluster, RDFMG, is currently a 7 node computing cluster where the Head Node is equipped with 2 AMD OPTERON 6320 Processors (16 cores) , 8 Seagate 4TB HDD 7200RPM SAS 12GB/s and 32GB of Memory. The 6 processing nodes are each equipped with a QUAD AMD Opteron 6320 (64 Core Hyper-threading), HGST 3.5’’ 6TB SAS 6GB/s, Kingston 16x 8GB 1600MHz DDR3 (128GB memory) and 40GB QDR Infiniband; Compute nodes in the Linux cluster will be added to provide additional computational capability.
  2. The Windows server, Beta, has 4 AMD opteron 6386 SE (64 Cores Total), 30TB of Raw Storage, 1TB of Memory (32 x 32GB DDR3 LRDIMM), QDR Infiniband and GTX TITAN 12GB GPU.
To investigate the risk of super criticality and boiling in the Spent Fuel Pool. Special attention must be given to the deterministic and probabilistic analysis to ascertain that risks are well known and the mitigation strategies are in place. This must consider several parameters such as burn-up, checker-boarding and fuel integrity.

The proposed cooperative research project will investigate the risk of super criticality and boiling in the SFP. This proposed framework will utilize risk informed approaches to identify parameters necessary to ensure that risks of super criticality and boiling in the SFP are minimized. According to the definition risk is a probability multiplied by consequences. The proposed assessment will utilize probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods combined with deterministic studies in the areas of thermal hydraulics, and reactivity (criticality) to evaluate consequences [1]. This framework will form a technical foundation to be used to devise mitigation strategies and provide input to developing regulatory changes by NNR. METHODOLOGY The tools to be used in this project consist of MCNP6 [4], SCALE-6.2 [5], COBRA-SFS [2] and MCNP6/CTF [3-6]. MCNP will be utilized to carry out analysis of criticality safety while SCALE-6.2 will be used to confirm independently the MCNP criticality calculations, perform depletion calculations when needed, and conduct uncertainty analysis and propagation. COBRA-SFS, a thermal-hydraulic code developed for steady-state and transient analysis of multi-assembly spent-fuel storage will be used to model important physical behavior governing the thermal performance of SFPs, with internal and external natural convection flow patterns, and heat transfer by convection, conduction, and thermal radiation. Of particular significance is the capability for detailed thermal radiation modeling within the fuel rod array. The multi-physics code MCNP6/CTF, developed at NCSU, will help investigate criticality (reactivity) and boiling in SFPS taking into account complete modeling of all feedback effects involved. The proposed project will develop models for the Koeberg nuclear power plant spent fuel pool for the computation tools involved in the project: MCNP6, SCALE-6.2, COBRA-SFS and MCNP6/CTF.  The proposed work will require use of high performance computing facilities. The Virtual Computing Laboratory at NCSU (https://vcl.ncsu.edu/) will be utilized.  The Office of Information Technology (OIT) High Performance Computing (HPC) services provide NCSU students, faculty high performance computing resources, and consulting support for research and instruction. Campus Linux Cluster, henry2 has 1192 dual socket servers with Intel Xeon Processors (mix of single-, dual-, quad-, six-, and eight-core), 2-4GB per core distributed memory, dual gigabit or 10Gb Ethernet interconnects. Also integrated into henry2 are a number of nodes with 16 cores and up to 128GB of memory. These nodes are intended to support shared memory (OpenMP) jobs or other jobs with large memory requirements. The HPC services are available allowing for running jobs up to 128 processor cores up to 48 hours. The number of nodes can also be expanded on demand to accommodate higher computational requirements. In addition, the Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Modeling Group (RDFMG) at NCSU, led by Dr. Avramova, has the fowling computational resources

 

  1. The Linux cluster, RDFMG, is currently a 7 node computing cluster where the Head Node is equipped with 2 AMD OPTERON 6320 Processors (16 cores) , 8 Seagate 4TB HDD 7200RPM SAS 12GB/s and 32GB of Memory. The 6 processing nodes are each equipped with a QUAD AMD Opteron 6320 (64 Core Hyper-threading), HGST 3.5’’ 6TB SAS 6GB/s, Kingston 16x 8GB 1600MHz DDR3 (128GB memory) and 40GB QDR Infiniband; Compute nodes in the Linux cluster will be added to provide additional computational capability.
  2. The Windows server, Beta, has 4 AMD opteron 6386 SE (64 Cores Total), 30TB of Raw Storage, 1TB of Memory (32 x 32GB DDR3 LRDIMM), QDR Infiniband and GTX TITAN 12GB GPU.
- Author
Published by Bradley Bock

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