News

Card image cap
Can wildlife biosurveillance prevent future pandemics?

“One health” refers to a transdisciplinary approach that focuses on the convergence of humans, animals and their various environments. The University of Pretoria (UP) is strategically well positioned to lead this research field because it has several faculties which, combined, have the necessary expertise and infrastructure to address the transdisciplinary research aspects of this complex field.

Card image cap
Researcher Profile: Prof Wanda Markotter

Professor Wanda Markotter is a virologist who began her academic career at the University of Pretoria (UP) in 2004 and is currently the Director of its Centre for Viral Zoonoses in the Department of Medical Virology at the University’s Faculty of Health Sciences.

Card image cap
Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Prevention is in the genes

Globally, 14 million people are diagnosed with cancer each year, and about nine million lose their lives to the disease annually. But next-generation DNA technologies and sequencing are heralding a change to the outlook of the disease, and the rapid development and roll-out of DNA tests could save lives.

Card image cap
Fast facts about breast cancer

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, an annual campaign by private and public healthcare organisations to increase awareness of the disease on a national scale. In the infographic below, UP researcher Professor Annie Joubert guides us through some facts on breast cancer and what you need to know about the disease.

Card image cap
UP Whale Unit to gather data on dwindling southern right whale populations during 41st aerial survey

The Whale Unit at the University of Pretoria’s Mammal Research Institute (MRI) will be conducting this year’s aerial survey of southern right whales from 28 September to mid-October. This is the 41st annual southern right whale photo-identification aerial survey, making it one of the longest-running datasets on any marine mammal worldwide.

Card image cap
UP Zoology prof part of study that finds hummingbirds drop body temperature to near freezing point to survive cold nights

A University of Pretoria professor of zoology was part of a team that recently published a study that reveals that tiny hummingbirds living in the Andes Mountains in Peru drop their body temperature from 40°C to 3.3°C, near freezing point, to survive bitterly cold nights. “It is the lowest body temperature reported so far in any bird or non-hibernating mammal,” says UP’s Professor Andrew McKechnie.

Card image cap
Heritage: Researcher Profile - Dr Siona O'Connell

Dr Siona O’Connell is based in the University of Pretoria’s School of the Arts and is a founding member of the Critical African Studies project at UP (CAST UP). She was the recipient of the prestigious National Endowment for the Humanities Professor of the Humanities in Africana and Latin American Studies, Art and Art History and Film and Media Studies at Colgate University in the USA.

Card image cap
Heritage: Finding your way back home after being ‘uitgesmyt’

Uitgesmyt – ‘cast out’ – is a documentary by Dr Siona O’Connell which tells the story of the first land restitution case in South Africa.

Card image cap
New study finds SA’s springhare is a better hopper than Australia’s kangaroos

While kangaroos are distinguished for their well-developed hindlimbs which they use to hop across the Australian outback, it seems South Africa has its own unusual hopper – the springhare. A new study published in the Journal of Anatomy suggests that “the diminutive springhare is a bit better at hopping than its more famous Australian counterpart, at least when it comes to muscle-tendon design, and implications for fast and accelerative hopping”.

Card image cap
Spacing out: Air pollution and human health

Professor Janine Wichmann is an environmental epidemiologist and Head of the Environmental and Occupational Sciences Division, School of Health Systems and Public Health, at the University of Pretoria.

Card image cap
Video: Pretoria’s air is two times more polluted than the World Health Organisation allows.

Watch this short video which takes us through how air pollution is linked with human ill health, such as respiratory disease, and the links which UP researchers, Dr Bukola Olutola and Prof Janine Wichmann, have found between air pollution and respiratory disease on cold and warm days in a study carried out in Secunda.

Card image cap
Air pollution, temperature and respiratory disease: a South African study

Global warming and air pollution have something in common: their effects on human health. Air pollution is a well-known cause of breathing problems. Hot weather can also bring on these symptoms.

Card image cap
Video: How can we help the trees? International Year of Plant Health Part 5

Video: The polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) is a tiny, invasive black beetle from Asia that has recently been discovered in South Africa. Although only 2 mm in length, this tiny beetle has detrimental consequences for South African trees, as it carries a destructive fungus, Fusarium euwallaceae, from tree to tree.

Card image cap
Are your trees at risk? International Year of Plant Health Part 6

Here’s a handy list of the tree species which have been known to be infected by the polyphagous shot hole borer already.

Card image cap
The secret behind SA’s disappearing urban forests - International Year of Plant Health Part 1:

Dr Trudy Paap is a participant in the International Plant Sentinel Network who was tasked to do routine surveys for tree pests and diseases in the National Botanical Gardens of South Africa, a project funded by the South African National Biodiversity Institute. It was during one of these surveys that she noticed small lesions resembling shotgun marks on the stems and branches of mature London plane (Platanus x acerifolia) in the historical avenue of the KwaZulu-Natal National Botanical Garden in Pietermaritzburg.

Card image cap
FABI embraces the 4IR with technology that unravels the genetics behind fungal genome evolution: International Year of Plant Health

In the age of genomics and bioinformatics scientists can produce massive amounts of data on deadly fungi threatening biodiversity and agriculture.

Card image cap
Why it’s so critical to continuously monitor and manage plant diseases

Most of us understand the critical importance of monitoring the spread of diseases. And it is as important for plant diseases as it is for humans.

Card image cap
UP researchers draft new UN standards on use of force by police

The United Nations in Geneva has released global standards on the use of force by the police worldwide. UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet welcomed the new United Nations Human Rights Guidance on the Use of Less-Lethal Weapons in Law Enforcement and urged all states to follow it.

Card image cap
Major new US study measures police use of force against standards set out in UP research

Research from the University of Pretoria’s Faculty of Law has become a global benchmark for a major US-based study on the use of force by police in America.

Card image cap
ANALYSIS: The continued threat of coal mining at the Mapungubwe world heritage site

Most developing countries face acute tensions between socio-economic development and environmental protection. Any opposition to proposed development, on environmental or heritage grounds, is seen as a threat to the creation of employment and the growth of the economy.

Showing page record 1 to 20 of 754 (38 Pages)