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Programme: MSocSci Industrial Sociology and Labour Studies (Coursework)

Code Faculty
01253030 Faculty of Humanities
Credits Duration
Duration of study: 2 years Total credits: 180
Contact:
Prof CM Tshoaedi
[email protected]
+27 (0)124203111

Admission requirements

- An honours degree in Sociology Industrial Sociology or a directly related social science is required.

- A minimum average of at least 70% for this degree is needed.
 
 
 

 

Additional requirements

It is only possible to choose Sports Psychology as an option if the candidate complies with the prerequisites as set out by the head of department.

Other programme-specific information

  • Choose either SOC 830 or SOC 862 as core modules.
  • Choose one elective module.
  • SOC 830 and SOC 862 can only be chosen as an elective when not already selected as a core module.
  • Not all modules are offered in any given year. Contact the programme manager in this regard.

Minimum credits: 90

Core modules

SOC 812    Advanced research methodology   

Select One of the following:

SOC 830    Conflict management in the workplace   

SOC 857    Globalisation and development             

Elective modules

Select One of the following:

SOC 830    Conflict management in the workplace**

SOC 857    Globalisation and development**

SOC 858    The sociology of South Africa                 

SOC 859    Identity, culture and society           

SOC 860    Civil society and the state                   

SOC 862    Sociology of work and organisations

**When not already selected as a core module.

Core modules

  • Module content:

    This course aims to extend the range of research methods and strategies that students are familiar with and to deepen their existing understanding of methods and approaches to social research. Key components are an introduction to the formal university processes in order to obtain permission to enter the research field, the elements of a good research proposal, and strategies for identifying a research area and delineating a question. In addition, the question of why we do social research and the different ways in which research can make a social contribution will be discussed. Finally, we consider how to go about locating a study within a research tradition and linking ‘research’ and ‘theory’. This module requires of students to develop and write a full research proposal.

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  • Module content:

    This module focuses on reviewing and interrogating sociological theories of and explanations for conflict in the workplace, with specific emphasis on issues such as strike violence.

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  • Module content:

    This module examines theoretical explanations of globalisation. In doing so its primary goal is to explore ways in which capital in the era of the end of history is compelling us to rethink sociology as a science of the present. The module begins with theoretical discussions in order to lay the ground for talk about development as a process of incorporating (in this case) Africa into the page 5 of 11 123347 S 33/15 global world system. The module further studies changes brought about by globalisation to the nation-state system, work and gender relations. It also examines nationalism and ethnicity as specific features of capitalism in the era of the end of history. 

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Elective modules

  • Module content:

    This module takes a sociological approach to understanding and interrogating South African society. It begins by looking at some of the debates and discussions about Sociology in South Africa. It then reviews and debates key issues in order to understand the political economy of Apartheid. Finally it looks at some key debates associated with post-apartheid South Africa.

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  • Module content:

    This module focuses on the relationship between the personal and social and how these two domains are intricately related, simultaneously implying sameness and difference in the process of identification. It considers how societal structures and institutions shape and construct identities historically, whilst being shaped by individual agency, in turn. Human experience reveals a range of cross-cutting affiliations, based on ethnicity, race, religion, gender, sexuality and generation, amongst others, implying a multiplicity in belonging, suggesting a relational process, rather than an essence. The social, contingent and constructed nature of identities is highlighted against experiences of dislocation within a context of globalisation.

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  • Module content:

    The module will critically assess theoretical and current debates on the nature of the state and civil society as well as their interrelationship. In particular, the module explores conceptualisations of the state and civil society in Africa, as well as their historical trajectories in relation to the question of social transformation. Throughout, an emphasis will be placed on sociological perspectives that emphasize the importance of situating power relations within a context of socio-economic and socio-cultural relations.

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  • Module content:

    The module will assess and debate issues and theories relevant to the realm of work and of organisations sociologically speaking. Questions such as: how the latter has been structured by various forms of the capitalist labour process; of how organisations operate and are managed and, of leadership will be addressed.

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Minimum credits: 90

Core modules


The information published here is subject to change and may be amended after the publication of this information. The General Regulations (G Regulations) apply to all faculties of the University of Pretoria. It is expected of students to familiarise themselves well with these regulations as well as with the information contained in the General Rules section. Ignorance concerning these regulations and rules will not be accepted as an excuse for any transgression.

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