Chantel Niebuhr

[email protected]

Chantel Niebuhr is a Lecturer in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Pretoria also currently completing her Doctoral studies. She graduated from the University of Pretoria with a degree in Civil Engineering, completed her BEng(Hons) degree in 2016 and obtained a MEng degree in Water Resource Engineering in 2018. She is also a Researcher for the Water Research Commission of South Africa and has been working on multiple rural electrification projects through the use of hydropower and more specifically researching and experimenting with newer technologies such as hydrokinetic energy development. She has presented at numerous conferences around the world on renewable energy technologies and water engineering processes. Currently she is focussing on research into Small-scale hydropower, Conduit Hydropower, Water distribution systems, Hydrokinetic energy development and CFD modelling within this field. 

 

Current Teaching Duties

  • Supervising undergraduate final year research project students (SSC411)
  • SHC 310
  • SHC 321
  • SHC 410
  • SKE 220
  • Post graduate Water Resources Engineering modules.
  • Continuous Professional Development courses to industry (Free Surface Flow modelling, Flood hydrology and stormwater modelling)

 

Current Research Interests

  • CFD analysis of hydrodynamic effects of hydrokinetic turbines.
  • Hydrokinetic development within water infrastructure
  • Hydropower for rural electrification
  • Conduit Hydropower
  • Free surface flow behaviour

 

Publications

A summary of her publications can be found on Researchgate and Google Scholar.

- Author André Broekman
Published by Srinivasu Nadupalli

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