CDs

The following CDs are available and are also online on the African Veterinary Information Portal (AfriVIP):

 

African swine fever

African swine fever


VTD001CD
R 150.00

African swine fever (ASF) in its classical form is a peracute to acute, highly fatal disease of domestic pigs caused by a virus. It was originally confined to Africa by its natural hosts, namely argasid ticks and wild suids in which infection is inapparent. The disease is characterized by high fever, short course with skin congestion, cyanosis, prostration, and widespread haemorrhages in many organ systems, particularly the lymphoid tissues. Morbidity and mortality rates are almost 100 %. However, where the disease has become endemic in domestic pigs, mortality rates may be considerably reduced.

This video provides information on the epidemiology, clinical signs, pathology and diagnosis of African swine fever.

Click here to view the video on YouTube.

 

African swine fever control

African swine fever control


VTD002CD
R 150.00

Overt African swine fever (ASF) in its classical form is a peracute to acute, highly fatal disease of domestic pigs caused by a virus. It was originally confined to Africa by its natural hosts, namely argasid ticks and wild suids in which infection is inapparent. The disease is characterized by high fever, short course with skin congestion, cyanosis, prostration, and widespread haemorrhages in many organ systems, particularly the lymphoid tissues. Morbidity and mortality rates are almost 100 %. However, where the disease has become endemic in domestic pigs, mortality rates may be considerably reduced.

This video provides information on the control of African swine fever.

Click here to view the video on YouTube.

 

Besnoitiosis

Besnoitiosis


VTD003CD
R 150.00

This CD refers primarily to bovine besnoitiosis, but equine and caprine besnoitiosis are briefly referred to. The life cycle of the causative organism is described by means of an animated diagram. The pathogenesis of the acute (anasarca) and chronic (scleroderma) stages is explained and illustrated by animations. The clinical signs are illustrated by means of photographs and video clips. Diagnostic techniques are explained and illustrated. The development and application of a specific vaccine is described.

Click here to view the video on YouTube.

 

Bovine spongiform encephalopathy

Bovine spongiform encephalopathy


VTD005CD
R 150.00

Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is characterized by behavioural changes, locomotory disturbances and loss of condition. The course of the disease is about 1-3 months terminating in death in some animals, but many are slaughtered because of unmanageable behaviour or trauma due to falling.

Affected cattle were first identified in the United Kingdom in 1986, as a result of feeding contaminated ruminant protein and affected nearly 200 000 cattle. Since then BSE has been reported in several other countries.

Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans most likely results from the consumption of beef products contaminated by central nervous system tissue.

This video aims to provide infromation on the clinical signs of BSE both from the perspective of the presenting signs initially reported by farmers, and clinical signs observed in the advanced stages of the disease.

Click here to view the video on YouTube.

 

Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia

Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia


VTD006CD
R 150.00

Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is an acute, subacute or chronic disease of cattle and occasionally of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides Small Colony (MmmSC). The acute to subacute disease is characterized by a serofibrinous pleuropneumonia and severe pleural effusion. Persistent pulmonary sequestra result in the development of a chronic, often subclinical, carrier state in many recovered animals.

This video provides information on the aetiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical signs, pathology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and control of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

Click here to view the video on YouTube.

 

Death of the big prides

Death of the big prides


VTD007CD
R 150.00

Bovine tuberculosis was introduced into the Kruger National Parks, South Africa, in the 1960s.

This video gives a brief overview of the lesions of tuberculous lions as well as the social impact that the disease has in the lion polulations in the Park.

Click here to view the video on YouTube.

 

Foot-and-mouth disease

Foot-and-mouth disease


VTD008CD
R 150.00

Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and usually acute affliction of cloven-hoofed animals and camelids caused by a virus of the family Picornaviridae. The susceptibility of different species to infection and their ability to transmit it are, however, highly variable. In cloven-hoofed livestock the disease is usually characterized by high morbidity, low mortality and the development of vesicles and erosions in the mucosa of the mouth and skin of the interdigital spaces and coronary bands.

This video provides information on the aetiology, epidemiology, clinical signs, pathogenesis, pathology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and control of foot-and-mouth disease particularly as it pertains to the African situation.

Click here to view the video on YouTube.

 

Lumpy skin disease

Lumpy skin disease


VTD009CD
R 150.00

Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is a pox viral disease of cattle, characterized by fever, multiple firm, circumscribed skin nodules, necrotic plaques in the mucous membranes (chiefly of the upper respiratory tract and oral cavity), mastitis, orchitis and swelling of the peripheral lymph nodes. The disease is caused by a capripox virus of which the prototype strain, “Neethling'” was first isolated in South Africa. Clinically, the skin lesions of LSD closely resemble those of pseudo-lumpy skin disease caused by the Allerton strain of bovid herpesvirus 2.

Lumpy skin disease is notifiable to the Office International des Epizooties (OIE). Although it does not have a high mortality rate (usually less than ten per cent), it is of economic importance because of permanent damage to hides, the prolonged debilitating effect it may have on severely affected animals with consequent losses resulting from reduced weight gain, temporary or permanent cessation of milk production as a result of mastitis, temporary or permanent infertility in bulls as a consequence of orchitis, and abortion in approximately ten per cent of pregnant cows.

This video provides information on the aetiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical signs, pathology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and control of lumpy skin disease.

Click here to view the video on YouTube.

 

Malignant catarrhal fever

Malignant catarrhal fever


VTD004CD
R 150.00

Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) remains a sporadic but economically important disease worldwide. The disease is notifiable to the Office International des Epizooties (OIE), the World Organisation for Animal Health's classification of economically important diseases. It has inter alia socio-economic importance within countries, and can be significant in the international trade of animals and animal products. Another important aspect of the disease is its clinical resemblance to other OIE listed diseases that may complicate the diagnosis for inexperienced or uninformed clinicians, most notably rinderpest, foot-and-mouth disease, bovine viral diarrhoea and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis.

Domestic cattle are more susceptible to the wildebeest-associated form of the disease than to the sheep-associated disease, and the former is therefore more common on the African continent where the carriers (reservoir hosts) of alcelaphine herpesvirus type 1, namely blue and black wildebeest have close contact with domestic cattle. In some areas, demographical changes and changes in farming methods and approaches have been responsible for MCF being viewed as an emerging disease. This particular livestock-wildlife interface has at times been responsible for strained relations between cattle farmers and land owners involved with ecotourism and hunting.

This video aims to provide the latest information on the aetiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical signs, pathology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and control of MCF.

Click here to view the video on YouTube.

 

Rabies: If I only knew...

Rabies: If I only knew...


VTD011CD
R 150.00

The Greek word for rabies, “lyssa” refers to the violent nature of the disease. The genus of viruses responsible for rabies belongs to the genus Lyssavirus in the family Rhabdoviridae. Rabies as well as the link between human disease and animals has been known for several thousand years, but the first meaningful descriptions of the disease came from Italy in the early 1500s. In modern society rabies remains a feared disease as it was in antiquity, especially as canine rabies (street rabies) became a scourge in the 19th century. Today canine rabies is geographically widespread and continues to represent a significant public health threat, particularly in developing countries where human deaths have been estimated to be at least 50 000 annually. The disease is notifiable to the Office International des Epizooties (OIE), the World Organisation for Animal Health's classification of economically important diseases, which means it has socio-economic and public health importance within affected countries, and is significant in the international trade of animals and animal products.

This video places particular emphasis on the risks that canine rabies has for humans, and attempts to inform viewers how to manage the risk both from a preventative and post-exposure point of view.

 

Rabies: In humans and animals

(Only available to Educational Institutions - not for sale to the public)

Rabies: In humans and animals


VTD010CD
R 150.00

The Greek word for rabies, “lyssa” refers to the violent nature of the disease. The genus of viruses responsible for rabies belongs to the genus Lyssavirus in the family Rhabdoviridae. Rabies as well as the link between human disease and animals has been known for several thousand years, but the first meaningful descriptions of the disease came from Italy in the early 1500s. In modern society rabies remains a feared disease as it was in antiquity, especially as canine rabies (street rabies) became a scourge in the 19th century. Today canine rabies is geographically widespread and continues to represent a significant public health threat, particularly in developing countries where human deaths have been estimated to be at least 50 000 annually. The disease is notifiable to the Office International des Epizooties (OIE), the World Organisation for Animal Health's classification of economically important diseases, which means it has socio-economic and public health importance within affected countries, and is significant in the international trade of animals and animal products.

The first part of the video provides comprehensive information on the clinical signs of rabies in all domestic animal species, some wild animals and humans. The second part of the video deals with specimen collection and transport, laboratory diagnosis, vaccination, post-exposure prophylaxis and treatment, and certain regulatory aspects relating to the control of the disease in both humans and animals.

 

Rift Valley fever

Rift Valley fever


VTD012CD
R 150.00

Rift Valley fever is a peracute or acute disease of domestic ruminants in Africa and Madagascar, caused by a mosquito-borne virus and characterized by necrotic hepatitis and a haemorrhagic state, but infections are frequently inapparent or mild. The disease is most severe in sheep, cattle and goats, producing high mortality in new-born animals and abortion in pregnant animals. It is a zoonosis and humans become infected from contact with tissues of infected animals or by mosquito bite. Infection in humans is usually associated with mild to moderately severe influenza-like illness, but severe complications such as ocular sequelae, encephalitis and haemorrhagic disease, occur in a small proportion of patients. Outbreaks of the disease occur when particularly heavy rains favour the breeding of the mosquito vectors. In 2000–2001 Rift Valley fever virus escaped from the African region to cause a major outbreak of disease on the Arabian Peninsula.

This video provides information on the aetiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical signs, pathology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and control of Rift Valley fever.

Click here to view the video on YouTube.

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Published by Linda Poggenpoel

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